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Concurrent Poster Presentations [clear filter]
Thursday, June 18
 

5:15pm

A Social Support Intervention to Improve Resilience Among Pakistani Women: A Proposed Randomized Controlled Trial
Abstract #271
A Social Support Intervention to Improve Resilience Among Pakistani Women: A Proposed Randomized Controlled Trial
Presenter: Saima Hirani Co - Presenters: Gerri Lasiuk, Colleen Norris  
Abstract:
Women’s mental health is a global health concern given the burden of mental disorders on individual women and negative implications for children and families. Like other developing countries, Pakistan’s mental health resources are inadequate to provide tertiary services for those in need. This situation calls for a paradigm shift away from symptom reduction and toward mental health promotion. There is a need for innovative interventions that are low cost, feasible, gender sensitive, and can be implemented at the primary health care level. Resilience has been associated with improved mental health and emotional well-being. Although there are clear relationships among social support, resilience, and mental health, they have not yet been tested in the Pakistani. The proposed randomized controlled trial will test a social support intervention to enhance resilience among disadvantaged women in Karachi, Pakistan. The randomly allocated intervention group will receive a 6-week social support intervention delivered by a community health worker, while the control group will receive a sham intervention. . Measures of resilience and quality of life will be compared at baseline and post-intervention. The results of the study will advance our understanding of the associations among resilience, social support, and mental health promotion in the developing world.

Presenters
avatar for Gerri Lasiuk

Gerri Lasiuk

Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan

Co-Presenters
GL

Gerri Lasiuk

Associate Profesor at University of Alberta Dr. Gerri Lasiuk is an Associate Professor and Director or the Nursing Simulation Centre in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta. Her clinical, teaching, and research interest relate to psychiatric/ mental health nursing... Read More →
CN

Colleen Norris

Professor at University of Alberta Dr. Norris holds joint appointments at University of Alberta’s Faculties of Nursing, Medicine andSchool of Public Health. Her PhD, from the University of Alberta, is in clinical epidemiology and herresearch focuses on the health outcomes of patients... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Study on the Development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience for College Students in Taiwan
Abstract #330
A Study on the Development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience for College Students in Taiwan
Presenter: Wen-Chih Tseng
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience (CATBR), a new assessment tool for identifying college students’ resilience. The instrument was analyzed in terms of (a) its factor structure and (b) the reliability of its resultant subscales. There are four subscales on the CATBR including: psychological flourish (21 items), spiritual wellness (20 items), social engagement (19 items) and family strength (18 items). Internal consistency was determined using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and reliability estimates of these subscales ranged from .82 to .92.The researcher conducted exploratory (N = 765) and confirmatory factor analyses (N = 738) to examine the construct validity of the CATBR. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the fit of the model of the psychological flourish, spiritual wellness, social engagement and family strength scales. Additionally, the scale's convergent and discriminant validity was also examined.According to these findings, the CATBR is an appropriate assessment tool to measure comprehensively the strengths and assets of college students. Further, the CATBR provides important information on how to enhance resilience of college students who encounter a series of setbacks. Implications for using the CATBR and recommendations for further development were discussed.

Presenters
WT

Wen-Chih Tseng

Wen-Chih Tseng is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at National Hsinchu University of Education, Taiwan. His research interests are in positive psychology, resilience and serious play.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Systematic Review Of Studies On Ethnic Minority Students In Hong Kong: A Strident Call For Policy Makers Regarding Youth-Friendly Social Policy
Abstract #292

A Systematic Review Of Studies On Ethnic Minority Students In Hong Kong: A Strident Call For Policy Makers Regarding Youth-Friendly Social Policy
Presenter: Gizem Arat
A systematic review of studies on ethnic minority students in Hong Kong: A strident call for policy makers regarding youth-friendly social policy Ethnic minorities are more likely to be trapped in school disengagement, academic failure, and social exclusion under the current Hong Kong education system. Therefore, this systematic review aims to reveal research gaps which may help scholars focus on ethnic minority students' protective resources which may be useful for policy makers to design programs targeting academic integrity and social inclusion. A systematic review of available literature was carried out based on peer-reviewed articles published in English using PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO HOST, ERIC, ProQuest databases, Google scholar, and hand searching. Sixty-four thousand and eight hundred and eleven articles were retrieved of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. Results demonstrate that the majority of existing studies (mostly compromised qualitative) solely examines the link between school sphere (teachers, Chinese language efficiency) and ethnic minority students based on problem-driven approach. However, it barely discusses the socio-ecological factors which may be beneficial for EM students to overcome school disengagement, perceived discrimination, and social exclusion regarding strength-based approach (resilience). Ultimately, findings highlight the potential importance of resilience approach which will benefit not only school staff and mental health professionals but also social policy makers to design youth-friendly programs in the long run.


Presenters
avatar for Gizem Arat

Gizem Arat

PhD candidate, The University of Hong Kong, Department of Social Work and Social Administration
I hold my MSW from the University of Pitstburgh, School of Social Work and worked as a social worker with at-risk youth. I am a second-year PhD student in the University of Hong Kong, Department of Social Work and Social Administration. My research area is ethnic minority youth's... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Validation Study of the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) scale with a French-Canadian Sample
Abstract #302
A Validation Study of the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) scale with a French-Canadian Sample
Presenter: Martine Hébert Co - Presenters:  Nathalie Parent, Caroline Simard, Odin Hjemdal
Abstract:
Resilience is a phenomenon reflecting positive adaptation despite the presence developmental threats such as adversity and trauma (Masten, 2001). It is particularly important for adolescents, thriving with developmental tasks of role and identity definition, who may be confronted with significant challenges and adverse life events. Although psychometrically sound measures are essential for theory development and clinical practice, measures of resilience in adolescence are scant. The Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) is a 28-item scale, declined in five dimensions: personal competence, social competence, structured style, family cohesion, and social resources (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen & Rosenvinge, 2006). The READ is a valid, reliable and practical instrument for resilience and risk prevention research. The present study aims at exploring the psychometric properties of the French Canadian version of the READ with a sample of 587 adolescents. The analysis of the psychometric properties of the translated scale includes exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency and convergent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis supports the five-factor structure of the scale. Internal consistency score are found to be satisfactory, ranging from .69 (Structured style) to .92 (Family cohesion). Convergent validity of score from the READ is established by significant relationships with score from life satisfaction and self-esteem scales.

Presenters
MH

Martine Hébert

Martine Hébert (Ph.D. in psychology) is professor at the sexology department of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She has training in child development and child clinical psychology as well as a strong background in psychometry. In the past 25 years, her research interests... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents... Read More →
NP

Nathalie Parent

Psychologist - National University of ColombiaMaster of Mental Health - University of AntioquiaInvestigator and professor of the research line on resilience and positive development of the National School of Public Health at the University of Antioquia, coordinator of the observatory... Read More →
CS

Caroline Simard

Caroline Simard, M.A. is a doctoral student in measurement and assessment in the Faculty of educational sciences, Université Laval, Canada. Her thesis aims at investigating the models of resilience and the salient constructs for the explanation of the phenomenon. Relying on a meta-analytic... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Addressing Methodological and Theoretical Gaps in Researching Resilience and Wellbeing: a Capability Approach towards the Wellbeing of South Sudanese Refugee Youth in Uganda
Abstract #325
Addressing Methodological and Theoretical Gaps in Researching Resilience and Wellbeing: a Capability Approach towards the Wellbeing of South Sudanese Refugee Youth in Uganda
Presenter: Julie Schiltz
Abstract:
Research on the wellbeing of young refugees is increasingly shifting towards a resilience perspective. Yet, a lack of empirical evidence on trajectories of wellbeing and resilience of young refugees hampers the design of tailored interventions and sustainable support. This poster presentation outlines the design of an ongoing PhD study on the wellbeing and resilience of South Sudanese refugee youth in northern Uganda. The study adopts a Capability Approach to address methodological aspects, theoretical underpinnings and contextual embeddedness of current empirical studies on the wellbeing of refugee youth. The Capability Approach is a normative framework to evaluate and assess wellbeing and social arrangements, with an explicit focus on the design of policies, and proposals about social change in society. More specifically, the study explores ‘capabilities’ or freedoms that refugee youth deem valuable in their lives, and the opportunities and barriers they experience in the pursuit of their wellbeing. The study adopts an ecological, multifaceted and strengths-based perspective to study wellbeing and resilience of refugee youth, and thereby seeks for an alternative to common individualizing and western-based approaches in refugee literature that focuses excessively on trauma and victimhood. The longitudinal mixed method research design including community based research approaches aims to make this study more contextually valid, empowering and relevant for all stakeholders involved.     

Presenters
JS

Julie Schiltz

Julie is a PhD student at the department of Special Education at Ghent University (Belgium) and is affiliated to the Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations (CCVS) as a researcher. She studied Educational Sciences and Conflict and Development Studies at Ghent University. She... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Addressing Processes Before Outcomes: Designing Effective Interventions To Improve Academic Outcomes For Children In Foster Care
Abstract #280
Addressing Processes Before Outcomes: Designing Effective Interventions to Improve Academic Outcomes for Children in Foster Care
Presenter: Jaime Wegner-Lohin  
Abstract:
In order to be more effective, interventions designed to improve academic outcomes for children in foster care must address the processes that lead to improved education outcomes. Child maltreatment has a number of negative consequences on both the neurodevelopmental and attachment processes of the developing child, which contribute to difficulty with skills required to learn in the classroom. A review of the empirical literature was completed on processes and interventions associated with improved education outcomes for maltreated children. Findings suggest a number of processes that contribute to improved academic outcomes following maltreatment including self-regulation, executive functioning, and social competency. In contrast, the majority of existing interventions focus on improving reading and math scores and fail to address the underlying processes associated with improved functioning in the classroom. This presentation advocates the need to refocus interventions to target the processes associated with improved educational outcomes prior to focusing on academic achievement. Further, the need to simultaneously address systemic issues within child welfare and education practice, policy and research will also be discussed as a means to improve education outcomes for children in foster care.

Presenters
avatar for Jaime Wegner-Lohin

Jaime Wegner-Lohin

McGill University - School of Social Work
Jaime Wegner-Lohin is a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Work at McGill Universxity.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Child Labor And Resilience In The Perspective Of Families With Work History
Abstract #314
Child Labour and Resilience in the Perspective of Families with Work History
Presenter: Aline Mantovani
Abstract:
Work is a social, cultural, historical and political phenomenon that affects children and adolescents worldwide and develops employees in different meanings, sometimes positive, sometimes negative. Therefore, this study aims to draw some reflections on resilience from the perspective of adults who had an early involvement in labor activities, seeking to understand their life histories and social mechanisms that produce evaluative discourse and/or critical of the forms of work developed as children and/or adolescents. Such a problem has been addressed through the use of questionnaires, interviews and photographs from the four research participants and presented from a historical analysis of the emergence of child labor, national and international legal provisions and the different points of view regarding their families characterization in our society. The results point to the multiplicity of meanings attributed to child labor, coming by risk factors related to schooling and health care and/or protection related to social, emotional, and economic development. Cultural and community aspects observed in the data collected in support for understanding the development and demonstration of resilience in the lives of individuals.

Presenters
AM

Aline Mantovani

Educator, graduated from Universidade Estadual Paulista - Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCT/UNESP) in 2008. Master in Education from this university in 2012 and a doctoral student in the Graduate Course in Education also by FCT/UNESP, focusing on child labor and resilience in adults with... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Children of African Origins Displaying Resilence in Berlin
Abstract #318
Children of African Origins Displaying Resilence in Berlin 
Presenter: Tricia Morrison/Isichei
Abstract:
Currently, I’m enrolled in the Master’s program Childhood Studies and Children’s Rights at Free University Berlin Germany. I’m presently in the process of writing my Master’s Thesis on the Topic of Resilience. The research will focus on Resilience displayed by Children of African Descent/Migration Background living in Berlin Germany. The Target Group is 10-20 children of African origins living in Berlin for at least 5 years within the age range of 10-19 years. The Grounded Theory research technique along with a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods will be used to collect and analyze data. However, expertise knowledge of the Resilience Research Centre available through the RRC Evaluation Tool Basket and previous studies done by the Centre will be used as a guideline and a point of reference throughout the entire research project. Within the framework that, “…resilience is both the capacity of individuals to navigate their way to the psychological, social, cultural, and physical resources that sustain their well-being, and their capacity individually and collectively to negotiate for these resources to be provided in culturally meaningful ways” ( Ungar: 2008), it is my intention to present the research findings as a Paper Presentation.

Presenters
TI

Tricia Isichei

Im a teacher from Jamaica W.I. who migrated to Berlin 3 years ago. Where Im currently doing a Masters in Childhood Studies and Children's Rights. Within the field of Children’s Rights there is a discourse of representing children from Africa and children with African origins as... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

CYRM-28: Translation And Cultural Adaptation In Spain
Abstract #311
CYRM-28: Translation and Cultural Adaptation in Spain 
Presenter: Maria Llistosella Piñero Co - Presenter: Angela Bejarano 
Abstract:
Resilience, CYRM-28, Spain, translation, cultural adaptationIn 1012, we were the translation and cultural adaptation of the CYRM-28 scale in Spain. With a sample of 340 adolescents in the District of San Lorenzo, in Terrassa, identified as vulnerable and at risk of exclusion, using the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin statistician for suitability and Barlett, which it was significant testing. We were an exploratory factor analysis of principal components with oblique rotation Oblimin with Kaiser. The 28 initial items, four were discarded for not saturate in any factor and found two conflicting items. Three components were identified: family interaction, explaining 17.7% of variance; Interaction with others with a 7.17% and skills or individual resources with 6%. We found the need to explore and to reformulate the expression of items 22, 1, 3, 9 as well as the conflicting 19, 23. Later, in 2013, we were a qualitative study through structured interviews with 10 young people aged between 14 and 19 years, identified by 5 experts, such as resilient. We discussed the resources that facilitate the process of resilience, creating 13 new items to take into consideration in Spanish population, as well as the reformulation of the 5 items listed above. This year we will do the CYRM-28 Spain validation.

Presenters
ML

Maria Llistosella Piñero

Maria Llistosella Piñero, native of Barcelona, 32 years old. Ten years of experience how nurse pediatric and community, working in a primary care center. Associate Professor of the "Escola Universitària d'Infermeria and therapy Ocupasional of Terrassa, attached to the Universitat... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Angela Bejarano

Angela Bejarano

Psychologist, Social Integration Secretariat- LGBT affairs
Psychologist and psychotherapist working for the Gender and Sexual Diversity Center (Public Policy for the Full Guarantee of the LGBTI Rights). Interested in the social and clinical scope and passionate to work with vulnerable populations and program interventions. Convinced that... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Development Of A Structured Support Programme To Enhance Resilience In Parents Of Children With Complex Health Needs: A Mixed Methods Participatory Action Study
Abstract #317
Development of a Structured Support Programme to Enhance Resilience in Parents of Children with Complex Health Needs: a Mixed Methods Participatory Action Study
Presenter: Sharon McCloskey  
Abstract:
Caring for children with complex healthcare needs places parents under additional strains compared to other parents with regard to their physical and emotional health, relationships and economic welfare. Yet great variation exists in how parents and families facing similar circumstances cope, with some exhibiting negative consequences of caring while others cope well and thrive. How families cope is linked to resilience. Research confirms the potential for resilience to be enhanced and group based interventions are one approach through which this may be promoted. This poster will outline the work undertaken to develop a programme with this group of parents (phase 1 of a 2 part study). A pragmatic research design was applied with adherence to the main principles and social justice goals of transformative research. The programme was developed through an iterative series of workshops and focus groups with parents which explored the demands they experience, what helps them to cope and what they would consider helpful in a programme. Their views have been linked with existing theory and research outcomes to develop a programme which takes account of the research evidence but has been shaped by the population it seeks to help. It will be tested in phase 2.

Presenters
SM

Sharon McCloskey

Sharon McCloskey is a registered nurse. She has worked in the field of children's palliative care and supported children with complex health needs and their families for 20 years. She is particularly interested in factors that help build resilience in parents and families of children... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Drawing Peace: Discourse Analysis Of Former Child Soldiers In Post-Conflict Situations
Abstract #274
Drawing Peace: Discourse Analysis of Former Child Soldiers in Post-Conflict Situations
Presenter: Eliza Martinelli  
Abstract:
The research discourses upon the social reintegration of former child soldiers in post-conflict, as resilience processes, in view of the obstacles of the United Nations Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration program (DDR) aimed at youngsters involved in armed groups. Thus, under the theoretical perspective of the Peace Studies, study developed at the University of Innsbruck (Austria), it is intended to analyze the deficiencies of the DDR program, whose bases are adaptations of a former pre-existent program for former adult soldiers and deal with a universalistic conception of childhood. It is necessary to acknowledge the specificities of former child soldiers at the time of social reinsertion, integrating the community in peacebuilding in conformity with its sociocultural values, besides highlighting the essential role of caregivers in the recovery of youngsters in post-conflict. Moreover, former child soldiers’ testimonials will be studied using the French strand of Discourse Analysis, to give voice to the youngsters and translate their real needs. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the obstacles of the DDR program aimed at former child soldiers under the Peace Studies’ view along with Discourse Analysis, highlighting the importance of the former child soldiers community (reinsertion target) seen as protective factors.

Presenters
avatar for Eliza Martinelli

Eliza Martinelli

Undergraduate student of International Relations, São Paulo State University
I am an undergraduate last year student of International Relations at Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp- São Paulo, Brazil). Since 2012, I have been engaged in an extension project group at the university, in which I am an educator sharing knowledge and reflections with young... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Dynamics Of Resilience In Forced Migration: A One-Year Follow-Up Study Of Longitudinal Associations With Mental Health In A Conflict-Affected Population.
Abstract #328
Dynamics of Resilience in Forced Migration: A One-Year Follow-Up Study of Longitudinal Associations With Mental Health in a Conflict-Affected Population
Presenter: Chesmal Siriwardhana  
Abstract:
Background: The concept of ‘resilience’ is of increasing interest in mental health studies in populations facing adversity. The stability of resilience levels and its associations with socio-demographic and mental health exposures were investigated in a conflict-affected, internal-migrant population.Methods: A follow-up study was conducted among Muslims displaced by conflict from Northern Sri Lanka 20 years ago but currently considering return migration. Of 450 participants interviewed at baseline in 2011, 338 (75.1%) were re-interviewed in 2012. Resilience was measured on both occasions using the 14-item Resilience Scale (RS-14), and common mental disorders using the Patient Health Questionnaire.Results: The mean resilience scores of the sample were 80.2 (95%CI 78.6-81.9) at baseline and 84.9 (83.5-86.3) at follow-up. At both time-points, lower resilience was independently associated with food insecurity, lower social support availability and social isolation. At both time-points, there were significant associations with CMD in unadjusted analyses, but the role of social confounders differed, only showing independence at baseline. Resilience was not associated with either incidence or maintenance of CMD over the follow-up period. Conclusion: In this displaced population facing a potential reduction in adversity, resilience was more strongly and robustly associated with economic/social factors than with the presence of mental disorder.

Presenters
CS

Chesmal Siriwardhana

Dr. Chesmal Siriwardhana is medical doctor by training and currently a Senior Lecturer in Public Health at the Faculty of Medical Science, Anglia Ruskin University, UK. He is also a visiting researcher at the Centre for Global Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Enhancement Of Resilience For Socially Disadvantaged Elementary School Children Through The Mentoring Program Baloo And You
Abstract #307
Enhancement of Resilience for Socially Disadvantaged Elementary School Children Through the Mentoring Program Baloo and You
Presenter: Wassilis Kassis Co-Presenter: Sibylle Drexler
Abstract:
Questionnaire data, collected in 2009, from a cross-sectional study of a randomly selected sample of 5,149 8th graders from four EU-countries (Austria, Germany, Slovenia, and Spain) was used to explore the effects of family violence on resilient adolescents.Our central question was: Is a positive resilience status (being non-violent/non-depressive despite experiencing family violence) a sufficient indicator for positive social and personal development? To answer this question we computed participants’ average protective and risk factors scores and used variance analyses to compare the means of the specific protective and risk factors of resilient adolescents who had experienced family violence with those who had not.We found that a positive resilience status is not sufficient for positive social and personal development. Resilient students who had been exposed to family violence showed significantly higher levels of social and personal risks and lower levels of social and personal protective characteristics than students without family violence experiences. These findings indicate that despite a positive resilience status, the higher the experienced level of violence family, the higher the risk characteristics and the lower the protective characteristics, even for resilient students, such that high levels of family violence “wash out” young people’s chances of positive development.

Presenters
WK

Wassilis Kassis

Wassilis Kassis, PhD, holds a Full Professorial Chair for Educational Science at the University Osnabrück/Germany. For more than 20 years, Kassis develops and coordinates projects of research on the social development of young adults within the context of family and school at national... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SD

Sibylle Drexler

After graduating with honors in sociology from the University of Bamberg, Germany in 2007, I began working as a research assistant at the european forum for migration studies (efms, Bamberg, Germany) analyzing a special tuition project for children from immigrant families. In 2009... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Evaluating Multi-Sector Collaboration to Promote Resilience
Abstract #301
 Evaluating Multi-Sector Collaboration to Promote Resilience
Presenter: Judy Gillespie
Abstract:
Multi-sector collaborations, with their capacity for boundary spanning communication, cooperation, and coordination, can promote resilience for at-risk children/youth, and families, increasing inclusion and access to resources. But such collaborations are difficult to establish and sustain. They require considerable commitment of time and resources. Participants and funders must perceive value for their investment, rendering evidence of impacts and outcomes increasingly important. Yet, conventional evaluation tools appear to have limited capacity to assist in the development of this evidence. Are multi-sector collaborations simply too messy, too unruly to be tamed by scientific methods of research and evaluation? Or, do we require more creative approaches to evaluation design, perhaps even to the kinds of evidence we are seeking to obtain? How might critical and participatory epistemologies assist in this endeavor? Using the example of multi-sector collaboration to address Aboriginal well-being, this presentation examines the challenges of evaluating their impacts and outcomes while highlighting promising approaches. Participants will be invited to consider and respond to the above questions through their own experience and insights. The presentation is intended to be part of a larger discussion concerning evaluation of community interventions that will be of interest to community practitioners, policy-makers, funders, and researchers.

Presenters
JG

Judy Gillespie

Dr. Gillespie is currently the Acting Director of the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus. Prior to obtaining her PhD, she worked for many years in children’s services in northwestern Alberta. Her research interests encompass the role... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Evaluation Of The Day Treatment Program: A Holistic Approach To Education And Intervention In The Early Years
Abstract #288
Evaluation of the Day Treatment Program: A Holistic Approach to Education and Intervention in the Early Years
Presenter: Angela Lenis Co - Presenter: Julie Gamboz  
Abstract:
The following report examines the outcomes of an early years intervention known as the Day Treatment Program. This program, located at Adventure Place, a children’s mental health agency in Toronto, Canada, serves children between the ages of 4 and 7 years, with moderate to severe needs. Children are treated by teachers and teacher-therapists, as well as a multi-disciplinary team, including social work, speech and language, psychological, and in-home support services. The agency employs a strength-based approach to intervention, focusing on family strengths to promote family engagement, increase child functioning, and overall family resiliency. Using a quantitative design, this evaluation investigated 8 key questions related to program goals. Findings suggest that the program is improving overall child and family functioning, particularly in the areas of children’s coping skills and caregiver advocacy and knowledge. These findings could help inform other community agencies on effective practices around treatment for children and families, as well as in completing successful evaluation projects in local community settings. This abstract is being submitted for a poster presentation.

Presenters
AL

Angela Lenis

Evaluation Coordinator, Adventure Place
Angela Lenis is the Evaluation Coordinator at Adventure Place, a children's mental health agency in Toronto. Angela has a Master of Arts in Child Study and Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, as well as an Honours Bachelor of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JG

Julie Gamboz

Psychometrist at Adventure Place Julie Gamboz is a Psycho-Educational Consultant at Adventure Place, where she provides assessment and consultation services to children involved with the agency. Julie also oversees many of the agency's evaluation initiatives. She received her Master's... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Factors Associated With Resilience In Youths: A Population Study In Medellín, Colombia
Abstract #320
Factors Associated with Resilience in Youths: A Population Study in Medellín, Colombia
Presenter: Alexandra Restrepo Co - Presenter: Nilton Montoya  
Abstract:
Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of protective factors and risk factors to which resilient youths, youths who engage in severely aggressive behaviors, and those who engage in other risk behaviors (i.e., drugs and sex) are exposed. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a representative sample of persons between 12 and 60 years of age from Medellín and the Metropolitan Area of the Aburrá Valley (n=4654). Probabilistic multistage study. Youths between 14 and 26 years of age were selected for this analysis (n=1780). Results: Resilient youths are twice as numerous as severe aggressors and have a greater probability of confiding in family members to solve their problems, are the subjects of greater vigilance by their mothers in childhood, and are more likely to report crimes to the authorities and to resolve conflicts by nonviolent means when a family member has been hurt. Family structure, school characteristics, and neighborhood characteristics do not seem to be as associated with resilience as family functionality, especially parenting style. Conclusions: The high proportion of resilient youths obliges us to redirect public policies for the tertiary prevention of violence to emphasize promoting resilient behaviors and the positive development of children and youths.

Presenters
AR

Alexandra Restrepo

Professor, university of Antioquia
Alexandra Restrepo, MD, MSci, Faculty member, University of Antioquia, Colombia. Director of Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Restrepo has conduct different research about violence and resilience in Medellin Colombia.. She has designed and evaluated different... Read More →

Co-Presenters
NM

Nilton Montoya

Statistician at University of Antioquia Nilton E. Montoya, BA. Specialist in Data base management and master in software Engineer. University of Antioquia, Colombia. Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Montoya has develop different research about violence... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Fostering Resilience Among Gay And Bisexual Boys: Risk And Protective Factors For HIV Risk Behaviours
Abstract #322
Fostering Resilience Among Gay and Bisexual Boys: Risk and Protective Factors for HIV Risk Behaviours
Presenter: Elizabeth Saewyc Co - Presenters: Yuko Homma, Jacqueline Gahagan, Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost, Gilbert Emond  
Abstract:
Gay and bisexual (GB) men are severely affected by HIV. Although the HIV rate is low among adolescents, GB boys are at higher risk for behaviours that can lead to HIV vs. heterosexual boys. We examined risk and protective factors for HIV risk behaviours among GB boys in British Columbia using the 2008 BC Adolescent Health Survey. The sample was 279 self-identified GB boys. HIV risk index scores were computed by summing eight items (e.g., unprotected intercourse, injected drug use). Examples of risk factors included violence exposure, sexual orientation-based discrimination, and history of government care. Protective factors were family connectedness, school connectedness, peer attitudes towards risk behaviours, and weekly involvement in extracurricular activities. We also tested whether a protective factor moderated the effect of risk factors on HIV risk behaviours. Multiple linear regression models identified violence exposure, discrimination, and ever being in government care as risk factors, and school connectedness and peer anti-risk attitudes as protective factors. We found moderation effects; for example, stronger school connectedness decreased HIV risk particularly among GB boys with sexual violence histories. Developing supportive school environments and promoting healthy peer norms about risk behaviours may foster resilience among GB boys even in face of stigma.

Presenters
ES

Elizabeth Saewyc

A Professor of Nursing and Adolescent Medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Dr. Saewyc heads the interdisciplinary Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre. She is a Fellow in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine and the Canadian Academy... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DB

Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost

Assistant Professor at Department Sexologie, Université du Québec à Montréal Dominic is a co-author, not a co-presenter, he will not be attending the conference. If you need a bio for him, please let me know, and I will submit it.
GE

Gilbert Emond

Associate Professor at Applied Human Sciences, Concordia University
JG

Jacqueline Gahagan

Professor/Director at Gender and Health Promotion Studies Unit, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University Jacqueline Gahagan is a Full Professor of Health Promotion, the Director of the Gender and Health Promotion Studies unit and Head of the Health Promotion Division... Read More →
YH

Yuko Homma

Postdoctoral Fellow at Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

From Stress To Challenge: Supporting Parents During The Transition Of Their ADHD Child To High School
Abstract #277
From Stress to Challenge: Supporting Parents During the Transition of Their ADHD Child to High School
Presenter: Sylvie Normandeau Co - Presenters: Lily Hechtman, Jessica Vaillancourt, Julie Girard-Lapointe, Julie Allard  
Abstract:
Parents' major concerns about their ADHD child's transition to high school are their child's capacity to cope with the higher academic demands and their own ability to adjust their supervision of homework. This paper assesses the impact of a program to support academic skills of ADHD children during the transition to high school, on parental stress. Families were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group. Parents completed the Stress index for parents of adolescents (Sheras et al, 1998) at pretest and posttest. They also reported on the child's improvement in organizational and learning strategies at posttest. Following the intervention, parents expressed less stress about their adolescent's emotional reactions, and interpersonal development. They expressed fewer difficulties in coping with their responsibilities of parenting, more satisfaction in the relationship with their spouse, and more confidence in their ability to cope effectively with their adolescent. Furthermore, they observed improvement in their adolescent's organizational skills: attention, task initiation, planning and prioritization, organization of space and schedule, time management, perseverance. These preliminary findings suggest that parents became more resourceful in meeting future challenges, developed a more positive view of themselves and their child as a result of their participation to the program.

Presenters
SN

Sylvie Normandeau

Sylvie Normandeau is full professor at the Université de Montréal and scientific director at Centre jeunesse de Montréal, Institut universitaire (child protection services). Over the years she has been involved in the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention or... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Julie Allard

Research coordinator at Univesité de Montréal Julie Allard is a psychoeducator. She coordinates research programs at the Université de Montréal. She was involved in the development of the Trasition program for ADHD children and the parents.
JG

Julie Girard-Lapointe

Graduate Student at Université de Montréal Julie Girard-Lapoint is a doctoral student in the school of psychoeducation at the Université de Montréal. She has been involved in community services for ADHD children. She participed in the Transition program for ADHD children and... Read More →
LH

Lily Hechtman

Psychiatrist at Montreal's Children Hospital Lily Hechtman is child psychiatrist in the deparment of psychiatry and pediatrics at Montreal's Chldren's Hospital. She is recognized for her research and expertise in the treatment of ADHD children, adolescents and adults.
JV

Jessica Vaillancourt

Research coordinator at Université de Montréal Jessica Vaillancourt is a psychoeducator. Over the last few years ahe has coordinated research programs and participated in the development of the Transition program for ADHD children and their parents.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Going To University As A Marker Of Young Carers’ Resiliency: An Exploration Of The Resiliency Process
Abstract #300
Going to University as a Marker of Young Carers’ Rsiliency: An Exploration of the Resiliency Process 
Presenter: Rebecca Enright
Abstract:
Young carers (YCs) are an understudied group of children and youth who care for family members with illnesses, disabilities or mental health issues (Aldridge & Becker, 1993). Research has identified negative developmental impacts of caregiving within emotional, psychological, social and academic domains (for a review, see Sahoo & Suar’s, 2009). Despite potential negative outcomes, some YCs succeed at post-secondary education, suggesting resiliency. The present study aims to determine protective factors that contributed to a YCs academic success and to determine how the resiliency process has been experienced from the YC perspective. This study is based on Masten’s (2007) “Short List” of resiliency correlates and explores how protective factors interact within multilevel systems (e.g., individual, behavioural, social) within the context of being a YC. Through semi-structured interviews, the experiences of ten female and male YCs who are currently university students are explored. Data will be inductively analysed to identify emerging themes related to the YCs experience of the processes of resiliency within the multilevel systems. Results will be discussed from an individual, behavioural and social perspective. Results may help community agencies to design YC programs which enhance protective factors within different systems.

Presenters
RE

Rebecca Enright

Rebecca Enright is a fourth year undergraduate student at Brock University, studying Honours Child and Youth Studies and Concurrent Education. Rebecca’s interest in resiliency first occurred when she travelled to Namibia, Africa in 2013 to study childhood resiliency in an international... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

How War Changes Parenting Ideas And Practices: The Views Of Elders Living In Post-Conflict Northern Uganda
Abtract #299

How War Changes Parenting Ideas And Practices: The Views Of Elders Living In Post-Conflict Northern Uganda
Presenter: Leen De Nutte
Studies on resilience and adversity have indicated the importance of parenting as a protective process for children in a context of (past) collective violence. However, little is known regarding the way parenting potentially changes following such violence. Therefore, this study explored parental beliefs and parenting practices through interviews (n=9) and focus groups (n=12 groups of 8 participants) with elders in Kitgum district, Northern Uganda. This area has been affected by collective violence which resulted out of the conflict between the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Ugandan government. Using a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach, it appeared that parenting has changed in divergent ways. First, particular parenting practices, such as fireplace teachings, were difficult to uphold during the war, since there was no time, space or opportunity to do so. Second, parenting is now much more seen as an individual responsibility which is juxtaposed to its collective responsibility in the past. Third, this study revealed a shift in traditional gender roles of parents. Practice and policy should take into account these changes in parenting with regard to the provision of context-sensitive interventions to support the process of resilience for both children and parents in the aftermath of collective violence.


Presenters
LD

Leen De Nutte

Leen obtained her master's degree in Educational Sciences (option Special Education) at Ghent University in 2013. She wrote her qualitative dissertation on supportive relationships and social support among war-affected adolescents who attended the Gulu Mental Health Unit in Northern... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Including Youth In The Development Of A Community-Based Research Project Examining Everyday Resilience In The Context Of Sexual Health And Structural Violence
Abstract #329
Including Youth in the Development of a Community-Based Research Project Examining Everyday Resilience in the Context of Sexual Health and Structural Violence 
Presenter: Eliana Suarez
Abstract: 
Resilience remains a generally underexplored area in the study of violence and health. Specifically in sexual health, the social consequences of HIV, particularly stigma and discrimination, should be addressed with clarity, using comprehensive conceptual frameworks of resilience. This paper reports on the process of including knowledge users in the development of a locally-informed, long-term research project examining HIV/STI prevention priorities as well as the intersections of resilience, HIV stigma, sexual violence, poverty and other indicators of structural violence among key populations of Peruvian youth in two different regions ( Lima and Ayacucho). Cultural differences in beliefs regarding sexuality and sexual health have been extensively noted; therefore the inclusion of two different cultural areas in Peru is essential to examine the unique context of everyday resilience among youth in both sites. Most importantly, resilience strategies may also be different, which indicates the need for distinct health policy and health promotion approaches for youth in these two locations. The contextual specificity and in-depth approach characteristic of community-based research have an important role to play in global health research and resilience studies.

Presenters
ES

Eliana Suarez

Dr. Eliana Suarez, is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University since 2011. She has an MSW and a PhD in Social Work from the University of Toronto. She has extensive experience in community mental health, specifically the nexus of trauma, resilience... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Individuals As Community Assets: Resilience And Hope In Community-Based Leaders Of Peru
Abstract # 276:
Individuals As Community Assets: Resilience And Hope In Community-Based Leaders Of Peru
Presenter: Roxanna Morote
Abstract:
Poverty and social violence have negative impacts on psychosocial well-being. However, in spite of living in social exclusion, community-based leaders improve their living conditions and become social caregivers. We explored if community-based leaders have higher levels of individual resilience and hope, and better indicators of emotional well-being. We compared college students (n = 323), non-organized adults (n = 202), and community-based leaders (n = 167) evaluated with the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA), the Herth Hope Scale (HHS) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25). Community leaders show higher levels of interpersonal competences and resources, positive self-evaluation and efficacy (RSA), as well as social and global aspects of hope (HHS). However, they show not better indices of emotional well-being (HHS hopelessness, HSCL anxiety or depression). In the three groups compared, low resilience is a significant risk for anxiety and depression (HSCL > 1,75), specially for women. Leadership and gender have significant main effects on the development of RSA social competences and resources (Factorial ANOVAs). In conclusion, leaders show outstanding resources but they are still vulnerable to emotional distress, thus community interventions should acknowledge both their strengths and vulnerabilities. Resilience research may connect individual and community assets through the study of social leadership.

Presenters
RM

Roxanna Morote Rios

Assistant Professor of the Department of Psychology and Graduate School (Ma. in Community Psychology) in the Catholic University of Peru. PhD in Psychology (University of Leuven, Belgium) and Ma. in Gender and Ethnicity (Utrecht University, The Netherlands). My current research focuses... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Innate And Extrinsic Resilience As A Motivational Driving Force
Abstract #278
Innate and Extrinsic Resilience as a Motivational Driving Force
Presenter: Glenn Richardson
Abstract:
The two key resilient experiences to thrive through adversity and challenge include an understanding of the resilient journey or resiliency mapping and the other is to discover innate core and common motivational energy centers within each person, family and organization that will facilitate resilient reintegration. This program will focus on the second experience of discovering innate resilience. The resilience drives that will be discussed include: 1. Essential Resilience as the sensitivity to listen to body messages that guide intuitive movement, eating, and sleep.2. Intellectual Resilience as the drive to understand, to discern, and to resolve.3. Childlike Resilience as the drive to enjoy life through adventure, play, and humor.4. Character Resilience as the drive to be free from guilt by living within a chosen character code.5. Noble Resilience as the drive to feel self-worth through the mechanism of altruism.6. Ecological Resilience as the drive to be enriched from one’s ecosystem (nature, music, animals, people). 7. Universal Resilience is the drive to receive insights and energy from sources beyond normal cognitive capacities. Integrative health modalities can be used to access sources of strength from the collective unconscious, quanta, Qi, or theistic spirit depending upon one’s belief system.

Presenters
avatar for Glenn Richardson

Glenn Richardson

Professor, University of Utah
Glenn E. Richardson, Full Professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of is the author of the foundational “Resiliency Model” published in 1990 and “The Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency” published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Participation Of Students With Intellectual Disabilities In Their Transition From School To Active Life
Abstract #315
Participation of Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Their Transition From School to Active Life
Presenter: Sarah Martin-Roy Co - Presenters: Francine Julien-Gauthier, Colette Jourdan-Ionescu
Abstract:
The transition from school to active life is a critical period for students with intellectual disabilities. When schooling ends, these students experience sudden changes, a reduction of services received, and they have difficult access to an active lifestyle. In this study, the transition is addressed with the ecological systems theory focused on resilience. This model aims to accentuate risk factors and the development of individual, familial, and environmental protection factors to support the individual during critical periods with an emphasis on the role of resilience tutors (Jourdan-Ionescu, 2001). The doctoral research aims to investigate the participation of students with intellectual disabilities in their transition from school to active life (knowing their views and participation in activities). The study will consist of individual interviews with students living with mild intellectual disabilities, a parent and a school worker, and the execution of instruments (The Resilience Scale (Wagnild & Young, 1993, adapted by Julien-Gauthier & al., 2012) and a social support network evaluation). Preliminary results will be presented and supported by data from a pilot project conducted with six students with intellectual disabilities in transition who have followed the approach of the Carte routière vers la vie adulte.

Presenters
avatar for Sarah Martin-Roy

Sarah Martin-Roy

Université Laval
Research assistant and student member for Consortium national de recherche sur l’intégration sociale (CNRIS) and Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES). Her research focuses on students (18-21 years old) with intellectual disabilities participation... Read More →

Co-Presenters
CJ

Colette Jourdan-Ionescu

Professor at Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières Colette Jourdan-Ionescu, Ph. D. is professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, researcher for the Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES) and the Scientific Council of the Association... Read More →
avatar for Francine Julien-Gauthier

Francine Julien-Gauthier

Professor in the Education Faculty, Université Laval
Professor at Université Laval, Francine Julien-Gauthier, Ph. D., is professor in the Education Faculty at Université Laval. Regular researcher for Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES), she conducts studies on the education of individuals with... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Pathways to Resilience: Perspectives from the Guamanian Sign Language Community
Abstract #333
Pathways to Resilience: Perspectives from the Guamanian Sign Language Community
Presenter: Heather Grace Zimmerman
Abstract:
Marginalized groups tend to experience significant adversity throughout their lives related to deficit perspectives from groups in power. In spite of difficult circumstances some are remarkably resilient. The current mixed methods study interviewed hearing caregivers and Deaf adults on Guam, in order to understand how they think about success and resilience related to deaf people. A content analysis revealed that: 1) Resilience is employed in culturally and contextually specific ways; 2) To be seen as successful, one had to be better than the norm, as in other marginalized groups; 3) Related to hearing loss, caregivers reported that their deaf children had a strong intuitive sense that allowed them to compensate for being deaf; and 4) for the sampled Guamanians, communication either promoted or obstructed deaf individual’s success and resilience. Findings support previous resilience research and add to our understanding of indigenous and deaf ways of “doing well” despite adversity.

Presenters
avatar for Heather Grace Zimmerman

Heather Grace Zimmerman

PhD Candidate, Gallaudet University
Zimmerman has a bachelors in ASL/English interpreting and a masters in International Development with a focus of people with disabilities in Small Island Developing States. She is currently a doctorate student studying resilience in deaf children and youth. She is interested in the... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Practitioner Resilience: The Contribution Of Professional Education
Abstract #310
Practitioner Resilience: The Contribution of Professional Education 
Presenter: Jörg Huber
Co-Presenter: Penny Lindley
Abstract:
The notion of ‘practitioner resilience’ is established within the literature. However, there is a lack of research examining the whole experience of student learning and the means by which this may enhance practitioner resilience. The research question underpinning this study was: How do student health visitors’ experiences in higher education and practice settings contribute to the development of their capacity to respond to the tensions between expectation and reality in their practice role? This presentation will share the study’s original contribution to the field through the development and application of a conceptual framework combining resilience and transformative learning theory to learning for practitioner resilience. The conceptual web of learning, depicting the complex process of development of practitioner resilience, supports a social theory of resilience. The study supports the contention that resilience can be learnt through professional education, contributing new knowledge regarding how this has been achieved during a course leading to a professional qualification. The study adds to the small volume of research carried out with students and contributes new insights into the development of resilience as part of a process of transformative learning.

Presenters
avatar for Jörg Huber

Jörg Huber

Professor of Health Sciences, University of Brighton
My presentation will discuss links between inequalities and achievements in educational settings, reviewing very brief interventions which allow young people to (i) negotiate the middle class culture of university, (ii) show resilience to stigma and (iii) adopt a 'growth mindset... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Predictors of Resilience Among High-Risk Mothers: Examining Individual, Interpersonal, and Community-level Factors
Abstract #305
Predictors of Resilience Among High-Risk Mothers: Examining Individual, Interpersonal, and Community-level Factors 
Presenter: Kathryn Howell Co - Presenters: Idia Thurston
Abstract:
Elevated rates of poverty and familial stressors among urban mothers heighten their risk for adversity, which may lead to increased psychopathology. Despite these potential challenges, a substantial percentage of high-risk women exhibit resilient functioning. Guided by social-ecological theory, this study examines the role of individual, interpersonal, and community-level factors in predicting resilience among mothers experiencing multiple adversities, including domestic violence, substance abuse, and severe medical illness. Participants included 45 female primary caregivers, aged 23-60 (M=37.9; SD=9.85). Sixty percent of participants had a yearly household income below $10,000 and 91% were African American. A hierarchical multiple regression model predicting resilience after controlling for individual (age and ethnic identity), interpersonal (spirituality and social support from friends and family), and community-level factors (community cohesion) was significant (F(6,32)=3.24, p=.013, R2=.38). In the final step of this model, higher resilience was associated with greater ethnic identity (β=.43; p=.016) and stronger support from friends and family (β=.35; p=.047). By identifying variables that can enhance resilience, this study offers unique insight into how the functioning of high-risk mothers may be improved at individual and interpersonal levels. Researchers and clinicians should consider these highly mutable factors when developing and implementing interventions for families experiencing adversity.

Presenters
avatar for Kathryn Howell

Kathryn Howell

University of Memphis
Kathryn H. Howell, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Memphis. Dr. Howell is best known for her intervention work with women and children coping with violence and other adversities, including evaluation of the Kids’ Club and Moms... Read More →

Co-Presenters
IT

Idia Thurston

University of Memphis
Assistant Professor at University of Memphis Idia Thurston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University of Memphis and adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UTHSC/Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Dr. Thurston graduated from the University of South... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Profiles of Connectedness: Processes of Growth and Resilience in Children with and without Cancer
Abstract #304
Profiles of Connectedness: Processes of Growth and Resilience in Children with and without Cancer
Presenter: Katianne Howard Sharp Co - Presenters: Victoria Willard, Yuko Okado, Rachel Tillery, Sarah Barnes, Alanna Long, Sean Phipps  
Abstract:
Children with cancer face numerous illness-related stressors, but demonstrate resilience via their low levels of posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and other distress symptoms, as well as perceptions of cancer-related positive growth. The present study examined whether profiles of connectedness to social and familial domains (e.g., peers, school, family, neighborhood) were related to resilience and growth, and tested whether these patterns differ for children with cancer versus healthy peers. Youth, aged 8-19 years, with cancer (n=153) and without (n=101), completed measures of connectedness, PTSS, and benefit-finding. Latent profile analysis revealed four distinct profiles: high connectedness across domains (45%); low connectedness across domains (6%); connectedness primarily to family (parents, siblings; 40%); and connectedness primarily to peers (9%). Presence or absence of cancer history did not predict profile membership; however, profiles differed on PTSS and benefit-finding. Children highly connected across domains displayed the lowest PTSS and highest benefit finding, with moderate PTSS/benefit-finding for the family and peer profiles. Findings support connectedness as a possible mechanism facilitating growth and resilience, with children diagnosed with cancer not appearing to experience diminished connectedness. As parent and peer profiles did not differentially predict PTSS/benefit-finding, children appear to experience the benefits of connectedness regardless of domain.

Presenters
KH

Katianne Howard Sharp

Katianne Howard Sharp, M.S. is a graduate student in the clinical psychology program at the University of Memphis where she has studied such topics as emotion socialization and children’s adjustment to stressful life events (e.g., IPV exposure, peer victimization). Katianne has... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SB

Sarah Barnes

Graduate Student Research Assistant at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/University of Memphis Sarah Barnes, B.A. is a graduate student in the clinical psychology program at the University of Memphis where she works with Kathryn Howell, Ph.D. studying resilience in children... Read More →
AL

Alanna Long

Clinical Research Associate-III at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Alanna Long works with Sean Phipps, Ph.D. at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on a study examining the stress, adjustment, and growth responses of children with cancer.
YO

Yuko Okado

Postdoctoral Fellow at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Yuko Okado, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in psychology working with Sean Phipps, Ph.D. She earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the Pennsylvania State University, where she worked as a research assistant at its... Read More →
SP

Sean Phipps

Member and Chair at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital Sean Phipps, Ph.D. a Member and the Chair of the Psychology Department at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He studies psychological effects of bone marrow transplantation, and coping and adaptive styles in children... Read More →
RT

Rachel Tillery

Graduate Student Research Assistant at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/University of Memphis Rachel Tillery, M.S. is a doctoral student at the University of Memphis. Her research interests include understanding psychosocial processes related to children's adjustment to stressful... Read More →
VW

Victoria Willard

Research Associate, St. Jude Faculty at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Victoria Willard, Ph.D. is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Her research focuses on social outcomes in children with cancer, with particular... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Project Resilience: Preparing Youth to Make Healthy Responses to Traumatic Events
Abstract #286
Project Resilience: Preparing Youth to Make Healthy Responses to Traumatic Events
Presenter: Anthony Hill  
Abstract:
Depression and anxiety disorders are pervasive public health concerns. According to the Mental Health Association, more than 100,000 from the state of Delaware (USA), including youth, are affected by these illnesses annually. Youth who experience bullying, gang violence, domestic and intimate partner violence or any life alternating experience are vulnerable to depression, anxiety, feelings of loneliness and isolation. Project Resilience is a community based initiative and its goal is to provide youth in Southern Delaware (USA) with opportunities to learn how to develop coping skills and inner strength, and to utilize family and community resources in times of crises. Youth who participate in the program will understand how to make healthy responses to traumatic events and how to use inner strength and utilize family and community resources to address crises. To measure resilience, youth who participate in the Project Resilience workshops completed the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM) before and after the training. This presentation describes the components of Project Resilience, discusses key findings, and considers implications for practice and policy.

Presenters
AH

Anthony Hill

Dr. Anthony J. Hill is an associate professor in the Department of Social Work at Delaware State University. He earned his Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Social Work from Howard University. His undergraduate degree was earned from the George Washington University... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Protective Factors in After-School Programs: A Case Study
Abstract #272
Protective Factors in After-School Programs: A Case Study
Presenter: Joshua Prior Co - Presenters: Daniela Zuzunaga , Tamara Kurz  
Abstract:
This project is a case study in the protective-factor promoting processes that take place in afterschool programs. Children growing up in low-income neighbourhoods face several risk factors that reduce the chances of a positive life outcome. When trying to break cycles of poverty and criminality, the scope of social programs available to at-risk children is varied. After school programs have been well researched in regards to the protective factors that they provide to at-risk children, and their abilities to enhance the future opportunities of said children. After-school programs in high-risk neighbourhoods derived from the desire to provide children with an environment that could deliver a caring milieu and positive social development. These community-building programs act as a catalyst for positive behaviour, resiliency and the amelioration of delinquent behaviours. This research regarding afterschool programs, which is its preliminary stages, seeks to understand the factors that play in providing a human service systems approach in a school setting, and how these factors create or increase resilience and protective factors. Furthermore, there is an emphasis in resilience as a result and by-product of grassroots community support, and the accessibility of the implementation of after-school programs as a means to create said resilience.

Presenters
JP

Josh Prior

Student at Vancouver Island University Josh Prior is a 4th year Criminology student at Vancouver Island University. He has taken specific courses outside of the required courses that deal with long-term crime patters and analysing geographic information for the purposes of looking... Read More →

Co-Presenters
TK

Tamara Kurz

MBA candidate at Vancouver Island University Tamara Kurz, an international student in Vancouver Island University’s (CA) and University of Hertfordshire’s (UK) double degree Master of Business Administration and Master of Science International Business program. Previously studied... Read More →
DZ

Daniela Zuzunaga

Daniela Zuzunaga is a 4th year Sociology student at Vancouver Island University. She has been involved with grassroots community organizing within Nanaimo, BC, and has been part of the board of Directors of a not for profit agency specializing in violence against women. Daniela has... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Protective Mechanisms As Moderators Of Relationship Between Risk And Behaviour Problems
Abstract #316
Protective Mechanisms as Moderators of Relationship Between Risk and Behaviour Problems
Presenter: Ivana Maurović Co-Presenter: Antonija Žižak
Abstract:
Adolescent in out-of-home care are facing high levels of risk to their development, both trough experiencing numerous of major life events as well as daily hassles. Nevertheless, majority of them (approximately 65%) don’t have any behaviour problems (Maurović, in press). The aim of this presentation is to identify which protective mechanisms (external and internal) serve as a moderators between risk (major life events and daily hassles) and behaviour problems; 2) to get to know the experience of resilient process of male and female adolescents that are assessed (by professionals) as resilient. Mix method approach was used. Quantitative date were gathered via self-assessment, with instruments: List of major life events, Daily hassles of adolescents in residential care (Maurović,2014), Resilience and youth development module (WestEd & CDE, 2000),Youth Self Report (Achenbach, 1991). Sample comprise whole population of adolescents aged 14 to 18, placed in 15 Children's homes in Croatia (N=228). Qualitative data were collected using in-depth interviews with 24 participants, age 14 to 21. Data will be analysed using hierarchical regression and thematic analysis, and mixed in the interpretation phase of research.

Presenters
IM

Ivana Maurović

Prof at Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation SciencesIvana Maurović is Research Assistant at Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is in the process of finishing PhD thesis „Resilience of adolescent's in Children's homes in Croatia... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Reaching for the Stars: Investigating Educational Aspirations and Expectations within a Resilience Framework
Abstract #296
Reaching for the Stars: Investigating Educational Aspirations and Expectations within a Resilience Framework
Presenter: Laurie Chapin Co - Presenter: Daniella Zileski  
Abstract:
Early school-leaving, lack of educational attainment and inequalities in higher education are issues of concern for society. Inquiries into students’ educational aspirations and expectations may be the key to addressing these issues. Socioeconomic status is categorised as a risk, family resources are protective factors, and high aspirations and expectations are positive outcomes. The present research investigated the aspirations and expectations of 183 Australian secondary students aged 13-18. The Child and Youth Resilience Measure-28 (CYRM-28; Resilience Research Centre, 2008), was utilised for a culturally sensitive measure of parental support. University expectations were comparably lower than the university aspirations for students from of a lower socioeconomic status. This finding highlights an aspiration-expectation gap amongst these students. The lower socio-economic status students had greater aspirations and expectations for TAFE (technical education in Australia) and other studies. The higher socio-economic status students had greater aspirations and expectations for university. As was anticipated all the family variables and university aspirations were predicted by parental educational aspirations and expectations, and parental support. Significant predictors for university expectations were parental expectations and parental support. The implications of these findings for interventions and directions for further investigations are discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Laurie Chapin

Laurie Chapin

Lecturer, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia
Laurie A. Chapin, PhD is a psychology lecturer at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. She received her PhD in psychology from Colorado State University in 2010. Her research interests include studying resilience of vulnerable youth with a focus on cultural factors. Previous... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DZ

Daniella Zileski

Daniella Zileski completed her honours degree in psychology in 2013. Her thesis topic was resilience and educational expectations and aspirations among Australian youth. As the top student at Victoria University, she was awarded the APS Prize from the Australian Psychological Soc... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Redefining Success: How Might The Perspectives Of Practitioners And Youth Inform The Evaluation Of Youth Job-Training Programs?
Abstract #282
Redefining Success: How Might the Perspectives of Practitioners and Youth Inform the Evaluation of Youth Job-Training Programs?
Presenter: Skye Allmang
Abstract:
Federally-funded youth job-training programs in the United States have undergone extensive evaluation since their creation in the 1960s. However, much remains to be learned regarding how these programs operate and what outcomes are achieved. Little has been documented on the practitioners’ or the youth’s perspectives of current evaluation practices, and whether they feel that evaluations have accurately represented their experiences with these job-training programs. This poster will highlight initial findings on practitioners’ perspectives on the evaluation of youth job-training programs, based on interviews conducted in the summer of 2014. Practitioners were asked to provide feedback based on their previous experiences with evaluation. They were also asked how their program defines success, and how that definition fits with their own definitions of success. Preliminary findings suggest that practitioners define success beyond whether or not youth experienced a change in earnings.The poster will outline next steps to be taken in the research process, including plans for interviewing youth participants, as well as ways in which information from the perspectives of practitioners and youth may be used to inform future evaluations of youth job-training programs.

Presenters
SA

Skye Allmang

Skye Allmang holds a B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Boston University, an M.P.P. from Brandeis University, and an M.S.W. from UCLA. Prior to coming to UCLA, she worked for several years as a project coordinator at a youth job-training program in Santa Barbara County. She currently... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors Of Later Academic Success In Elementary School Students
Abstract #297
Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors of Later Academic Success in Elementary School Students
Presenter: Jameela Conway-Turner Co - Presenters: Tanya Tavassolie, Adam Winsler
Abstract:
Resilience is defined as academic/social competency despite experiencing significant challenges (Masten & Coatsworth, 1998). Using public school records of child ethnicity, gender, receipt of free/reduced lunch, language at home, and parent report of marital status and education, we examine longitudinal predictors of academic resilience (receiving ≥ B average and passing standardized tests) using data from the Miami School Readiness Project. This sample includes 28,138 children (59.1% Hispanic, 33.5% Black; 57% ELL; 79% receiving free/reduced lunch) who completed third-grade after attending subsidized childcare and/or public school pre-K and receiving school readiness assessments in pre-K. Resilient students (~60% of sample) were less likely to be in poverty and more likely to be native English speakers, White, female, and from two-parent households with more educated parents. Selecting only those in poverty in K, logistic regression analyses found children’s social-emotional strengths at age four significantly predicted third-grade academic achievement. Additional analyses will investigate whether relations between social-emotional strengths and later academic achievement are different for different ethnic groups. Although numerous risk-factors decrease the likelihood of academic excellence, many children in poverty overcome such challenges and do well academically. Early social-emotional skills serve as an important protective factor for children experiencing early economic adversity.

Presenters
JC

Jameela Conway-Turner

Jameela is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Jameela received her Masters degree from Boston College in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology... Read More →

Co-Presenters
TT

Tanya Tavassolie

Doctoral Student at George Mason University Tanya is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Tanya worked as a research assistant in the Child Development Lab... Read More →
avatar for Adam Winsler

Adam Winsler

Professor, George Mason University
Dr. Adam Winsler is professor of applied developmental psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, USA. His research, represented in over 90 publications, examines private speech (self-talk) and its role in behavioral self-regulation and executive function among typically... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes
Abstract #295
Resilience in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes
Presenter: Luciana Cassarino-Perez Co - Presenter: Débora Dell'Aglio  
Abstract:
This study investigated processes of resilience in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, identifying risk and protective factors through multiple case studies. Participants were three adolescents, two boys and one girl, aged 13 to 14, who were patients of an institution specialized in treatment of diabetic patients, and their mothers. The instruments used were semi-structured interviews and the Five Field Map. The interviews were designed to investigate how these patients take care of their own health, how they cope with the disease, the benefits and losses of having diabetes, as well as personal characteristics and future plans. Qualitative content analysis was made using the WebQDA software, based on the Bioecological Theory of Human Development. It was found that protective factors such as social support, emotional attachment and personal characteristics of self-esteem, optimism and altruism, contributed to expression of resilience processes. Conclusions highlight the importance of strengthening the support network as a protective factor for coping with type 1 diabetes, especially through the integration between the different contexts in which teenagers are inserted.

Presenters
LC

Luciana Cassarino-Perez

Born in Curitiba, southern Brazil, Perez-Cassarino graduated in Psychology at the Federal University of Paraná (2008). Completed her Master in Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (2013), where she recently started her PhD studies. Her expertise in Psychology... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Debora Dell'Aglio

Debora Dell'Aglio

Professor, UFRGS
Professor at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, Dell’Aglio graduated in Psychology in the Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (1983). Completed her Master in Developmental Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (1992) and her PhD... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience, Agency, and Democratic Education
Abstract #268
Resilience, Agency, and Democratic Education 
Presenter: Michael Peacock
Abstract:
I am interested in creating an educational setting that promotes resilient attitudes for educational options. Research has identified educational variables that motivate students to learn, yet schools are not or cannot implement these recommendations with fidelity, especially those in the urban American cores (Brophy, 2010; Smith, 2009; Kozol, 2012) Currently, I work in an alternative public school that serves students in grades kindergarten through nine who have been referred out of their traditional public school environments due to significant behavior issues.  My interest in starting a school outside the traditional system stems from: observing how patterns of intergenerational social exclusion affect students and their families (Foster & Hagan, 2007) ; learning about various forms democratic and progressive educational environments and their outcomes (Neill, 1960; Kozol, 1972; Gray & Chanoff, 1986; Meier, 2003; Knoester, 2012); and, from living and working in an area where marginalized groups from various intersecting social constructions struggle to attain agency (Sugrue, 1996). Social, economic, political, and educational issues that have plagued urban metropolitan centers for over fifty years continue to crush youth with the ill effects of abuse, neglect, imprisonment, and broken networks of support (Brown v. Board of Education, 1954; Lempert, 1996; Burton, 2007; Sarchiapone, Carli, Cuomo, Marchetti, & Roy, 2009; Masten, Hubbard, Gest, Tellegen, Garmezy, & Ramirez, 1999). My intent is to bridge resilience theories with progressive/democratic educational practices and offer possible solutions that traditional public schools cannot or will not provide.

Presenters
MP

Michael Peacock

Graduate student at Eastern Michigan University studying Special Education for Students with Emotional Impairments


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience, Posttraumatic Growth And Positive Emotions In Parents Of Critically Ill Children
Abstract #290
Resilience, Posttraumatic Growth and Positive Emotions in Parents of Critically Ill Children
Presenter: Rocío Rodríguez-Rey Co - Presenter: Jesús Alonso-Tapia
Abstract:
Research on parental psychological effects related to a child’s critical illness has focused on studying negative outcomes; however, the positive outcomes have been overlooked. So, our aims were to study 1) the level of resilience, positive emotions, and posttraumatic growth (PTG) in parents of critically ill children and 2) which factors predict PTG after a child’s discharge from intensive care.A total of 143 parents were assessed 48h after the child’s discharge from intensive care, and 6 months later. Repeated Measures ANOVA and confirmatory regression analyses were conducted.Parents experienced twice more positive than negative emotions during admission, being gratitude and love the most prevalent ones. A high percentage of parents (60.84%) reported PTG. Resilience predicted 40% of the variance in PTG reported 6 months after the discharge, but this relation was mediated by positive emotions and stress (X2/df =1.67; GFI=.80; CFI=.84; IFI=.85; RMSEA=.069). The model showed that the higher was the difficulty of the situation, the higher the level of PTG reported. Not only distress, but also positive outcomes should be addressed when the effect of a traumatic experience is studied. This will led us to design interventions that takes into account not only psychopathology, but also positive changes.

Presenters
RR

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey is a Health Psychologist and a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Her field of interest is resilience, mental health, and posttraumatic growth in children who suffer from severe... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Jesús Alonso-Tapia

Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Jesús Alonso-Tapia is a full-time Professor in Psychological and Educational Assessment at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Specialized in Motivation, self-regulation, resilience and learning assessment, he received the First National... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resiliency And Peer Social Bonds: Do Shared Adverse And Marginalized Experiences Enabled Overcoming “The Odds” In Crime?
Abstract #313
Resiliency and Peer Social Bonds: Do Shared Adverse and Marginalized Experiences Enabled Overcoming “The Odds” in Crime?
Presenter: Angelique Maes
Abstract:
The effects of parental incarceration on children are only beginning to be fully understood. So far, we know more about the detrimental effects of parental incarceration on children throughout the life course than about the positive efforts to assist the afflicted children in overcoming a detrimental obstacle in their lives. This project seeks to fill the gaps in the growing literature on the effects of parental incarceration throughout the life course by exploring ethnographic data that will be collected on peer resiliency: peer resiliency may be considered as a possible method to mitigate the harmful effects of parental incarceration throughout the life course. Building from a previous project, this project seeks to further understand how resiliency thrives and enables personal growth through peer relationships. Research on the development of resiliency through the parent/child relationship has saturated the literature: there does not seem to be research on how peer relationships enable such developments when children have parents who are incarcerated. Current research on resiliency has done well to begin to highlight the positive “buffer” social processes that can build resilience in children with incarcerated parents, but more research must be done in regards to the role peer relationships in such processes.

Presenters
avatar for Angelique Maes

Angelique Maes

My name is Angelique Nevarez Maes; I am a second year PhD student at Texas A&M University. I have a Master of Art’s degree that specializes in Sociology from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a Bachelor of Art’s degree the specializes in Criminal Justice and Psychology from... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resiliency in Foster Youth and Perceived Social Support
Abstract #267
Resiliency in Foster Youth and Perceived Social Support
Presenter: Ciara Collins Co - Presenter: Preston Britner  
Abstract:
In this mixed methods study, we will present findings from program data collected by the UConn First Star Academy during its summer program in July of 2014. First Star brings high school foster youth from the state of Connecticut to spend one month living on campus participating in academically-oriented programming and building relationships with peers, mentors, and staff. The Positive Youth Development-Short Form and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support measures were administered pre- and post-summer program and qualitative journal questions were administered throughout the program. Journal prompts addressed topics such as identity, meaning making, support systems, coping strategies, adversities, and goals. Responses will be thematically coded by multiple researchers. The study will analyze quantitative and qualitative research individually as well as compare results between domains to arrive at an understanding that utilizes youths’ own voices. The goal of this study is to enhance data driven decision making over time in order to improve positive outcomes in at-risk foster youth.

Presenters
avatar for Ciara Collins

Ciara Collins

University of Connecticut
Ciara M. Collins, MA is a Doctoral candidate in the Human Development and Family Studies department at the University of Connecticut, recently completing her MA in the Marriage and Family Therapy program. She received her BA in Psychology from Biola University. She provides program... Read More →

Co-Presenters
PB

Preston Britner

Professor of Human Development & Family Studies at University of Connecticut Preston A. Britner, Ph.D. is the Philip E. Austin Endowed Chair and a Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

RPM-Android: A Tablet Application To Work Out Resilience With Vulnerable Families
Abstract #306
RPM-Android: A Tablet Application To Work Out Resilience With Vulnerable Families
Presenter: Marco Ius Co - Presenters: Carlo Fantozzi, Gianmaria Parigi Bini, Paola Milani
Abstract:
Professionals working with vulnerable families ask for new tools to facilitate their complex endeavor and to connect theory and practice. Within P.I.P.P.I. (Intervention Program for Prevention of Institutionalization) and its ecological perspective, particular focus is placed on tools supporting a resilience-based care process where the link between assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation is key, according to the participatory and transformative evaluation approach. In this framework, RPM-Android is a novel tablet application that aims at providing integrated support for all the professionals and members of families involved in the care process. Using the app:• children are involved in the assessment and planning by interacting directly with the tablet and navigating and negotiating the resources in their ecology;• professionals share information with parents, making them more involved and connected;• professionals easy document practice with the support of assessment, (micro)planning, evaluation, and a log of meetings with families.The paper will present the main features of RPM-Android, with particular emphasis on the innovative user interface for parents and children, then it will provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on the usefulness of the app in the workflow of social workers, based on data collected from a pilot of professionals within P.I.P.P.I. in 2014.

Presenters
MI

Marco Ius

Marco Ius got the PhD in Social Work with a research on resilience and Hidden Child Survivors of the Holocaust in 2009. From 2009 is Post-Doc researcher and from 2010 is part of the Scientific Group of the national Implementation of P.I.P.P.I. (Program of Intervention for Prevention... Read More →

Co-Presenters
GP

Gianmaria Parigi Bini

Master student at Department of Information Engeneering (DEI), University of Padova, Italy Master student in Computer Engineering.
CF

Carlo Fantozzi

PhD at Department of Information Engeneering (DEI), University of Padova, Italy Carlo Fantozzi is Assistant Professor at the Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova. His current research interests are in the fields of high-performance computing, models of computation... Read More →
PM

Paola Milani

PhD at Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, Italy Paola Milani is associate professor of Family Education and General and Social Pedagogy at the FISSPPA Department. Her research topics regards family education, social... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

School And Education: A Survey Of Articles Between 2000 To 2013
Abstract #323
School and Education: A Survey of Articles Between 2000 to 2013
Presenter: Vanessa Hanayo Sakotani
Abstract:
This abstract presents parcial analysis of a research that aims to analyse scientific publications on resilience and education, published in the period 2000-2013, in Portuguese. The search for articles was conducted on CAPES Journals Portal, SciELO and Medicine® with the following keywords: education and resilience, resilience, and school and student resilience, resilience, and student and teacher resilience, resilience and child and adolescent resilience. Among 15 articles that shows relations between resilience and education, we highlight 9 articles that approach the school’s roles to promote resilience. The articles declare that school is ideal place to promote resilience because: it’s possible to develop capabilities and potential of students (Peltz et al., 2010); when working with heterogenous groups it increases the relationship between students and teachers leading to human development (Fajardo et al., 2010); develop student autonomy (Scriptori and Junior, 2010), self esteem and self efficiency (Poletto e Koller, 2008); and coping strategies (Pinheiro, 2004); it’s exceeds only knowledge and help its to promote health, life quality and welfare (Fajardo et al., 2010). However, Peltz et al. (2010), Chrispino and Gonçalves (2013) and Amparo et al. (2008) indicate that school could be protective but it can be a risk, with teachers’ negative atitudes.

Presenters
avatar for Vanessa Sakotani

Vanessa Sakotani

Master Student, UNESP
I graduated in Education from UNESP and currently I'm Master student in Education at the same institution.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration
Abstract #289
Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration
Presenter: Geraldine Oades-Sese Co - Presenters: Joyce Lee, Sri Harathi, Victoria Millie, Melanie Yu, Ashley Rodgers, Isrin Srisethnil  
Abstract:
The purpose of the Sesame Street Resilience Project was to determine the effectiveness of the multimedia home intervention toolkit, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration (English and Spanish), in promoting resilience in young children ages 2 to 6. Parents were trained to implement a 4-week resilience-based intervention in their homes. The intervention group focused on enhancing children’s social-emotional resilience, while the active control group focused on building physical/mental resilience through healthy eating and exercise. Participants included 100 families from the Northeast and were from socially and culturally diverse backgrounds. Families were randomly assigned to an active control or intervention group. The project used standardized rating scales from parents to measure parent-child communication, home environment, children’s social skills, and emotional competence. The project data are currently being analyzed and therefore the poster will discuss the final results in more depth. The poster will also provide implications for parent-based interventions and their effects on at-risk populations.

Presenters
GO

Geraldine Oades-Sese

Geraldine V. Oades-Sese, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and the Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. She is also the Director of the Research Lab for Resilience and Early Childhood Development. Her research... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SH

Sri Harathi

Sri Harathi, is the lab manager of the Sesame Street Resilience Project for the Divorce/Separation and Incarceration studies at the Institute for the Study of Child Development in Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She has been working with the project since February of 2013... Read More →
JL

Joyce Lee

Social Work Supervisor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Joyce Y. Lee, LSW, is a licensed social worker and Social Work Supervisor at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her research interests include parent-based... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mille

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Victoria N. Mille, is a Masters in Social Work student at Rutgers University. She is also a Research Assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She is... Read More →
AR

Ashley Rodgers

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Ashley Rodgers, received her B.A. in Psychology and minor in Biology from Rutgers University in May 2015. Before graduating, she worked as a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development at... Read More →
IS

Isrin Srisethnil

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Isrin Srisethnil, is a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. He is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s in Psychology and a minor... Read More →
MY

Melanie Yu

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Melanie Yu received her B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies from Rutgers University in May 2015. Prior to graduating, she worked at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce
Abstract # 284:
Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce
Presenter: Sri Harathi Co - Presenters: Joyce Lee, Victoria Mille, Ashley Rodgers, Isrin Srisethnil, Melanie Yu
The purpose of the Sesame Street Resilience Project is to determine the effectiveness of the multimedia home intervention toolkit, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce, in promoting resilience in young children ages 2 to 6 whose parents are either divorced or separated. Participating families were given the toolkits along with a 4 week schedule of activities that outlined specific activities for each day of the program. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or active control group. The intervention group received materials directly addressing the issue of divorce or separation by teaching families about attachment relationships, emotional understanding, and sense of self. The active control group was given the Healthy Habits toolkit, which addressed the topic of healthy eating and lifestyle in order to promote physical/mental resilience. Participants included 100 families from the Northeast and were evaluated by a questionnaire that the parent filled out at pre- and post-intervention. The questionnaire included standardized measures that evaluated the parent-child relationship, emotional competence, and emotional regulation. The project data are currently being analyzed, therefore the poster will discuss the results in greater length. The poster will also address the implications of home interventions and their effects on at-risk populations.

Presenters
SH

Sri Harathi

Sri Harathi, is the lab manager of the Sesame Street Resilience Project for the Divorce/Separation and Incarceration studies at the Institute for the Study of Child Development in Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She has been working with the project since February of 2013... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JL

Joyce Lee

Social Work Supervisor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Joyce Y. Lee, LSW, is a licensed social worker and Social Work Supervisor at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her research interests include parent-based... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mille

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Victoria N. Mille, is a Masters in Social Work student at Rutgers University. She is also a Research Assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She is... Read More →
AR

Ashley Rodgers

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Ashley Rodgers, received her B.A. in Psychology and minor in Biology from Rutgers University in May 2015. Before graduating, she worked as a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development at... Read More →
IS

Isrin Srisethnil

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Isrin Srisethnil, is a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. He is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s in Psychology and a minor... Read More →
MY

Melanie Yu

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Melanie Yu received her B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies from Rutgers University in May 2015. Prior to graduating, she worked at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Shared Adversities of Disadvantaged Children and Comic Superheroes as Resources for Promoting Resilience

Abstract #263
Shared Adversities of Disadvantaged Children and Comic Superheroes as Resources for Promoting Resilience
Presenter: Maria Angela Mattar Yunes Co - Presenters: Chris Fradkin, Gelson Weschenfelder
Abstract:
Studies indicate that disadvantaged children are at higher risk for behavioral problems and psychosocial issues, in relation to their non-disadvantaged peers. If these issues are not addressed in childhood, these children frequently mature into adults at higher risk for substance dependence, depression, and incarceration, in relation to societal norms. This study examined possible relationships and associations between the real-life adversities of disadvantaged children and the fictional adversities of popular comic superheroes, in their pre-cloak, pre-costume stage of life. An indexing of comic superheroes was conducted. In the process, it was found that the most relevant superheroes, in terms of pop culture visibility (e.g., Spiderman, Batman, Superman) had a high commonality of shared adversities (e.g., abandonment by family, domestic violence and abuse) with several subgroups of disadvantaged children: orphaned and abandoned children. This untapped resource has potential among clinicians, social workers, and public policy designers for building resilience and promoting empowerment among this hi-risk child and adolescent group. 


Presenters
avatar for Maria Angela Mattar Yunes

Maria Angela Mattar Yunes

Associate Professor, Centro Universitário La Salle, Unilasalle, Canoas
Lecturer and advisor at the programs of post graduation studies in education in Centro Universitário La Salle - UNILASALLE, Canoas and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Brasil. Main interest on research and intervention on family resilience, community resilience and parental... Read More →

Co-Presenters
CF

Chris Fradkin

Chris Fradkin received his PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Merced. His research focus has been on obesity risk, quality of life, and health disparities among at-risk adolescents. He is currently conducting post-doctorate research at Centro Universitário La Salle... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sport For Resilience: Fostering Rural Youth Resilience Through Participation In Non-Therapy Equine-Based Activity
Abstract #324
Sport for Resilience: Fostering Rural Youth Resilience Through Participation in Non-Therapy Equine-Based Activity 
Presenter: Heather Sansom Co - Presenters: Harry Cummings, Leah Levac
Abstract:
Rural communities in Canada are changing. These changes include widening socioeconomic gaps amongst community members, and degraded infrastructure. Normative adversity associated with youth transition to adulthood is magnified in rural areas, where community-level changes are creating ecological conditions that can adversely affect youth. This leads to need for youth programming that is pro-actively inclusive of resilience needs. Sport-for-development (S4D) explores sport as a vehicle for combining physical and psycho-social development. Studies often show benefits akin to resilience factors. Yet, there are gaps in the research, which creates challenges for efforts to embed resilience goals in community recreation programs. There are very few S4D studies focused specifically on developing resilience amongst rural youth , and virtually no research that considers how program elements contribute to youth resilience. Equine-based therapy programs show resilience-related outcomes for youth, but non-therapy equine-assisted programs have not been studied extensively through a resilience lens, or as a community S4D option.This poster will spark conversation by: a) showing connections between rural needs, equine activity, S4D, and resilience; b) describing the methods and hypotheses of a current research project exploring how youth experience protective factors for resilience through participation in non-therapy equine-assisted programs.

Presenters
avatar for Heather Sansom

Heather Sansom

PhD Student, University of Guelph
Heather Sansom is a PhD student in Rural Studies at the University of Guelph, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development. Her doctoral work focuses on the intersections between rural wellbeing issues and rural recreation, sport-for-development, animal/nature based experiential... Read More →

Co-Presenters
HC

Harry Cummings

Harry Cummings, Phd., Professor, University of Guelph and Director Harry Cummings and Associates. Harry has taught evaluation at the University of Guelph for 35 years. He is author of the CES short course on program logic models. He has practised international development and evaluation... Read More →
LL

Leah Levac

Assistant Professor at University of Guelph Leah Levac is an Assistant Professor in Community Engaged Scholarship in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph. She has experience leading community-university research collaborations, professional background in... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Stay And Success School Teen Authors Ato Infraction: Perceptions Of Adolescent
Abstract #312
Stay and Success School Teen Authors Ato Infraction: Perceptions of Adolescent
Presenter: Elizabeth Lourenção  
Abstract:
This study aims to research the permanence and academic success of adolescents who have an offense, from their own perceptions . The theme presented here grew out of concern that we were awakened from our professional practice , working as a social worker in direct and indirect care of families experiencing situation of human rights violations , as well as in the discussion and planning of actions to direct execution of children and adolescents , along with the Public Prosecutor Ministry of Justice of the State of São Paulo - Regional Area Presidente Prudente , in particular, childhood and youth. The research subjects were 13 adolescents who infraction , in the age group between 12-18 years old, coming from the city of Presidente Prudente / SP , inserted or not in the public schools and under socio- open middle. The approach taken with adolescents was conducted through reflective interviews with semi-structured , in order to understand the phenomenon researched by the perceptions of the adolescents themselves , guaranteeing them the right to be heard , and then reflect upon their speech and if decline , disagree or modify their proposals . Documentary research was also conducted with individual plans of care ( PIA ), which sought to build his biographies of living.

Presenters
avatar for Elizabeth Lourenção

Elizabeth Lourenção

Master candidate in education, Faculty of Science and Tecnology, University from Sao Paulo (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil
I am a social worker working in the Prosecutor's Office of Children and Youth of the Public Ministry of the State of São Paulo; Professor of Social Work faculty in Presidente Prudente Toledo; I am applying for the master's degree in the graduate program in education at Universidade... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Stories Of Survival And Resilience From Aotearoa: A Qualitative Enquiry Into What Helps Māori Through Family/Whānau Violence.
Abstract #331
Stories of Survival and Resilience from Aotearoa: A Qualitative Enquiry Into What Helps Māori Through Family/Whānau Violence
Presenter: Anna Walters
Abstract:
Family violence is overrepresented amongst Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand, and as elsewhere has been found to have significant consequences for children. Extant research has been predominantly deficit-focused. The current project focused on protective factors and resilience. This was investigated through the use of qualitative methods, situated within a framework of kaupapa Māori methodology (indigenous research theory and methods). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with professionals working with Māori and survivors of family violence. Thematic analysis of transcripts revealed several dominant themes including the importance of having at least one supportive adult who they could trust; most often a family member or teacher. A positive connection with their Māori identity and culture was also considered to contribute to resilience with wairua (spirituality) being particularly important. Resilience was also assisted by having an interest or skill in which they experienced success or engagement. Connection with peers and having positive role models were considered helpful. Therapeutic contributions to resilience included promotion of a sense of belonging, building hope for the future, and assisting the survivor to accept that the violence was not their fault. Implications for professionals working with Māori families are presented.

Presenters
AW

Anna Walters

Anna is of Māori descent (Ngāpuhi). She was employed by the Department of Corrections for over eight years in the probation services. She is currently in her final year of a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, undertaking an internship in a Māori child and adolescent mental health... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Strengthening Family and Community Resilience: A Rational Approach
Abstract #279
Strengthening Family and Community Resilience: A Rational Approach
Presenter: Barry Smith
Abstract: 
It is important to recognise that resilience is a relational product which develops from early infant attachment through to family, neighbourhood, and community relationships. Along with good and effective parenting, a sense of community and social capital are two important aspects of engendering resiliency in individuals, families, and communities. Working with families living with disadvantage and poverty in West Cumbria, England, this study seeks to draw on resilience research from genetics, biology, psychology, and sociology in devising a family and community resilience intervention. The interrogation of two hundred and twenty family case files from the Howgill Family Centre reveals parenting and relationships to be two major presenting factors for families in need of assistance. As many of the parenting difficulties are themselves relational in nature, it appears that dysfunctional relations and communication are playing a major part in testing the resilience of children and their parents. In a highly innovative study aimed at promoting relationships as a protective factor, family centres and schools will be used as a community hub in exploring individual differences, relationships, and relational dynamics, as part of a strengths-based programme aimed at building family and community resilience.

Presenters
avatar for Barry Smith

Barry Smith

Project Officer/KTP Associate, University of Central Lancashire
R. Barry Smith is currently a doctoral research student at the University of Central Lancashire and engaged in a three year investigation into family resilience. This study involves a knowledge transfer partnership between the university and the Sure Start organisation, the Howgill... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Subjective Contextual Resilience Assessment: Comparison Of Three Different Populations.
Abstract #303
Subjective Contextual Resilience Assessment: Comparison of Three Different Populations
Presenter: Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido Co - Presenters: Rocío Rodríguez-Rey, Jesús Alonso-Tapia, Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz, Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno  
Abstract:
Resilience can be shown in different degrees across different kinds of adversity. No measure considering different contexts exists, so we validated a 20-item Subjective Contextual Resilience Scale (SCRS) with five problem areas –work, relationships, own health, close person health and economy. It was completed by 423 adults with three different conditions (health issues, parents of children with health or developmental issues and healthy adults) along with CDRISC10 and BRS questionnaire. We tested a 5x1 hierarchical factor model and conducted reliability and correlation analyses, and ANOVAs.The 5x1 factor structure was well defined, and reliability was good for all measures in all samples except for SCRS economic area –acceptable only in the healthy sample. Correlations among measures were acceptable, the highest ones being between SCRS –and its subscales– and BRS. There were no mean differences among samples in any measure including SCRS subscales, but a difference emerged in the work and relationships areas when comparing healthy adults to adults with issues (them or their children), showing greater resilience those with issues. There were also mean differences among SCRS’ subscales in all subsamples.Our contextual scale, therefore, can be used to measure resilience within different contexts and across different types of populations.

Presenters
avatar for Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Ph. D Candidate, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido is a Ph.D candidate at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, who develops her work in the area of resilience in health issues, particularly with People Living with HIV. She is also interested and engaged in research related to associated stigma and lack... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Jesús Alonso-Tapia

Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Jesús Alonso-Tapia is a full-time Professor in Psychological and Educational Assessment at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Specialized in Motivation, self-regulation, resilience and learning assessment, he received the First National... Read More →
CN

Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno is a Ph.D teacher in the Experimental Psychology Department at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She is interested in the study of basic processes in children with developmental difficulties, especially in children... Read More →
RR

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey is a Health Psychologist and a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Her field of interest is resilience, mental health, and posttraumatic growth in children who suffer from severe... Read More →
MA

Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz is a Ph.D teacher in Multivariate Techniques at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has collaborated in the development and adaptation to Spanish language of several quality of life measures.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Art Of Navigating Torrents: A Study Of Resilience Dimensions Among Adolescents By Ethic Group
Abstract #309
The Art of Navigating Torrents: A Study of Resilience Dimensions Among Adolescents by Ethic Group
Presenter: Monica Lavoie
Abstract:
How is it that an individual can hold out in front of life’s hardships? Resilience is a concept often used to account for one’s ability to bounce back, overcome, and even navigate torrents. The aim of this study is to document resilience dimensions according to an adolescent population adapted scale (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen & Rosenvinge, 2006), and according to the perspective of Euro-Canadians and First Nations. The scale proposed by Hjemdal and his collaborators suggests the five following themes to resilience: personal competences, social competences, structured style, family cohesion, and social resources. Two hundred and thirty adolescents, 143 Euro-Canadians and 87 First Nations, took part in this study and completed a questionnaire. An exploratory factorial analyse reveals divergent results according to the ethnic group. For European descent adolescents, a four factor solution is obtained. Otherwise, among First Nations, resilience is constituted of two dimensions. The challenge of articulating resilience dimensions reflecting cultural specificity is discussed.

Presenters
ML

Monica Lavoie

Monica Lavoie graduated from a bachelor in psychology at the Université de Moncton in 2011. Before undertaking post-graduate studies, she worked as a Research Associate with the Centre de recherche et de développement en éducation (CRDE). Her research interests include resilience... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Challenges to Children’s Rights in the Mtaa Mediation Committee System in Tanzania: A Case of Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam Region, Tanzania
Abstract #293
The Challenges to Children’s Rights in the Mtaa Mediation Committee System in Tanzania: A Case of Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam Region, Tanzania
Presenter: Angela Daniel Ifunya  
Abstract:
This is based on the research conducted in Kombo Mtaa Mediation Committee, Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam region, Tanzania.In many rural and poor urban areas of the world, people do not have access to state-administered justice and security institutions, or choose not to use them. In Tanzania, most of the disputes are resolved by grassroots institutions at the mtaa and ward level in the case of urban local governance authorities. The study aimed to better understand mtaa mediation committee system, provide knowledge about it, assess the problems and be able to recommend reform initiatives.I conducted in-depth individual interviews, observations and focus group discussions with 10 children aged 11-17 years old and 16 adults: mtaa mediators, parents, ward tribunal officials, community leaders and government officials. The findings reveals: lack of protection of children against family violence in a situation where the perpetrator is breadwinner; lack of proper involvement of children in cases determination; too much focussed on punishment including corporal punishment instead of rehabilitation; lack of protection in procedures when children put behind bars; lack of recording of proceedings and decisions; lack of adequate knowledge about rights of children to mtaa mediators.

Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Impact on Disadvantaged Pupils of a Whole School Resilience Approach
Abstract #298
The Impact on Disadvantaged Pupils of a Whole School Resilience Approach 
Presenter: Stephanie Coombe
Abstract:
This research used a Whole School approach, implementing the Resilience Framework (RF) developed by Hart, Blincow and Thomas (2007) to improve outcomes for children with complex needs, set in the context of socio-economic adversity (the third most deprived Borough in England). Pupils in this context benefitted from a whole school RF approach because it focused on their strengths and needs holistically, not just academically. The whole school approach involved recognised the importance and positive impact of relationships and significant others in pupils’ lives – site supervisors, teachers, cooks, sports coaches, senior leaders.A collaborative, mixed methods approach was used in this research to investigate the following aims with 12 staff and 12 pupils: To identify staff practice that supported their developing resilience in pupils. To identify with staff when, and whether a resilience framework could be incorporated into their daily practice.  To identify the mechanisms that staff and pupils consider have a positive impact on pupil’s wellbeing when using the RF. To address a gap in the resilience based practice literature on developing interventions for pupils with complex needs.

Presenters
SC

Stephanie Coombe

I am a PhD student with the University of Brighton and an Assistant Head Teacher in a Special School in East London for children and young people with Special Educational Needs. Professor Angie Hart and Dr Carl Walker, at the University of Brighton, supervise me. I hold a Bachelor... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Resilience Report: Therapeutic Use Of Measures To Guide Intervention And Conversation
Abstract #332
The Resilience Report: Therapeutic Use of Measures to Guide Intervention and Conversation
Presenter: Lyn Worsley Co - Presenter: Odin Hjemdal  
Abstract:
The use of online, self-report tools to monitor physical fitness has paved the way for similar tools to monitor wellbeing and resilience. An ideal resilience tool would give direct positive feedback; provide ideas for improvement and measure change over time. It would also use validated measures useful for research as well as provide ongoing evaluation tools to monitor the effectiveness of an intervention for large groups of people. The Resilience Report provides a snapshot of the specific resilience characteristics of individuals and provides avenues for intervention and on going support. The online report uses the Resilience Doughnut interactive tool (Worsley, 2010), the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen, Rosenvinge 2006) and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (Robert Goodman, 2005) to identify three key elements contributing to resilience and wellbeing. The results highlight strong available resources, five subscales of competencies and protective factors and four subscales of difficulties.The report can be used in organisations to establish the effectiveness of intervention programs and highlight participants who may need extra support. The report can be used as a self-report for individuals who want to self-monitor as well as a group report for coordinators in organisations who want to track the mental wellbeing of their students.The Report has a fun interface promoting interaction, conversation and curiosity and gives practical suggestions of ordinary magic that is already present in their lives.

Presenters
avatar for Lyn Worsley

Lyn Worsley

Director, The Resilience Centre
Lyn WorsleyLyn is a Clinical Psychologist with a background in nursing, teaching, and youth work. She is the director of the Resilience Centre in Epping, Sydney, which has a reputation for innovative solution, focussed approaches to client change through individual and group therapies... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Role Of Resilience Processes In Emotion Dysregulation, Parent Responses, And Childhood Loneliness
Abstract #326
The Role of Resilience Processes in Emotion Dysregulation, Parent Responses, and Childhood Loneliness
Presenter: Laura Schwartz
Abstract:
Unsupportive parent/child interactions can negatively impact children at multiple levels of functioning. It is unknown what role child resilience may play in buffering these deleterious effects. This study examined the associations between children's dysregulation of their anger, mothers' responses to their children's anger, and children's feelings of loneliness, as well as the moderating role of resilience processes. Participants included 174 children in grades 3-5 (Mgrade= 3.93). Children were predominately white (73%) and 53% were female. Children reported on their mothers' responses to their anger on the Emotions as a Child Scale to derive Neglect, Punish, Override, Magnify, and Support subscales. Self-reported mean scores for Peer Loneliness on the Loneliness Scale, Anger Dysregulation on the Children's Emotion Management Scale and total Resilience on the Child Youth Resilience Measure were used in all analyses. Separate multiple regressions for each parental response to anger subscale tested moderated mediation models. Results indicated significant moderated mediation, such that Resilience decreased the negative impact of Child Anger Dysregulation on Peer Loneliness (β=.05, p=.03) when mothers used Neglect, Magnify, Support, and Override responses to their children’s anger. Findings suggest that resilience processes, such as personal skills and education, may serve as a safeguard against childhood loneliness.

Presenters
LS

Laura Schwartz

Laura Schwartz a first year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology doctoral program at the University of Memphis. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology at The Ohio State University in 2012. Her research interests include how risk and protective factors, both... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Thrive
Abstract #273
Thrive
Presenter: Andraya Macmillan 
Abstract:
As a result of the growing number of youth struggling with mental health issues in our community, Rebound has created a resiliency based group to support youth in attaining the required non-cognitive skills to cope with real life issues such as disappointment, rejection, boredom and increase skills in the areas of persistence, self-determination, mindfulness. We use volunteers and staff to coach youth in a safe, supportive environment where new ways of thinking and coping can be practiced and reinforced. Youth leave the THRIVE program more self-confident and assured of their value to friends, family and our community.

Presenters
avatar for Andraya MacMillan

Andraya MacMillan

Program Coordinator, Sarnia Lambton Rebound
Andraya MacMillan is the Choices Provincial Lead as well as a Youth in Transition Worker with Sarnia Lambton Rebound. She has been working with Rebound for over 5 years now, has worked with high-risk youth for 14 years and is passionate about supporting her community. Andraya has... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Understanding Risk and Resilience in the Context of Childhood Polyvictimization
Abstract #327
Understanding Risk and Resilience in the Context of Childhood Polyvictimization
Presenter: Kathryn Scrafford  
Abstract:
Research exploring associations has emphasized single types of trauma exposure rather than exposure to multiple forms of violence. The study examined: the relationship between childhood and adulthood victimization; patterns of victimization and their association with current personality dimensions and resilience; and the associations between personality dimensions and resilience. A sample of 296 adults (18-76) exposed to violence in childhood responded to the survey online.A logistic regression examined the contribution of childhood victimization (CV) to adulthood re-victimization (AR) controlling for past year stress (PYS). Both CV (β=.124) and PYS (β =.092) significantly predicted AR.Based on victimization history, four groups were created (1= ≤ 3 events CV without AR; 2= ≥ 4 events CV without AR; 3= ≤ 3 events CV+AR; 4= ≥ 4 events CV+AR). ANOVAs revealed no significant differences in resilience or personality factors by victimization history except openness (F(3,268)=4.99, p

Presenters
KS

Kathryn Scrafford

Kathryn Scrafford is a doctoral student in Clinical Psychology and Peace Studies at Notre Dame. Her research interests include resilience and trauma in post-conflict societies.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Unstuffed! A School-Wide Strength-Based Teacher-Led Mental Health Conference. A Fresh Approach To A Resilience-Focused Mental Health Conference In A Secondary School Setting.
Abstract #287
Unstuffed! A School-Wide Strength-Based Teacher-Led Mental Health Conference. A Fresh Approach to a Resilience-Focused Mental Health Conference in Secondary School Setting. 
Presenter: Kingsley Hurlington Co - Presenters: Ruth Marinelli, Eileen Dahl  
Abstract:
An Ecological Framework of resilience posits the importance of environment in the development of resilience characteristics in individuals.
For teens, school can be one of the most important environments for bolstering resilience (Benard, 2006; Masten and Coatsworth, 1998). School needs to provide students with an environment that assists them with learning and also facilitates the development of personal resilience characteristics through positive mentorship (Ungar 2004). This program review explores the impact of a single mental health conference intervention on the strengthening of resilience characteristics in secondary school students. In response to growing concerns about mental health issues in the adolescent population (Lam, 2014), a mental health conference was created that offered students sessions led by teacher-mentors at their school. The results of student surveys indicated the significant effect of the intervention on their awareness of their own mental health challenges and that of their peers, increased confidence in negotiating their way to appropriate psychosocial supports, and deepened empathetic response to others in order to create a more positive and inclusive educational environment. Teacher-mentors also indicated their increased capacity to assist students in navigating mental health supports in their school and community.

Presenters
KH

Kingsley Hurlington

York Region District School Board
Kingsley Hurlington is a doctoral candidate at Trent University. He has authored textbooks related to Canadian Geography. His doctoral work focuses on resilience and communities, with a special focus on rural contexts. For this work, he draws upon his varied experiences working with... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Eileen Dahl

Eileen Dahl

Psychotherapist, Spiritual Care Professional, Consultant, Speaker
Eileen Dahl is a Registered Psychotherapist, Certified in Thanatology - death, dying and bereavement (CT) and a certified spiritual care practitioner / hospital chaplain. She has experience working in oncology and palliative care, trauma, mental health and cardiac intensive care... Read More →
RM

Ruth Marinelli

Teacher at York Region District School Board Ruth Marinelli is a secondary school teacher with the York Region District School Board where she works with academically and socially vulnerable students. She is a Masters of Education candidate at OISE.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Using Resilient Therapy In Practice: Family-Based Resilience Interventions
Abstract # 285:
Using Resilient Therapy In Practice: Family-Based Resilience Interventions
Presenter: Sarah Henderson
Abstract: 
Newport Mind and boingboing have been researching the use of Resilient Therapy over 18 months. We have been measuring and evaluating the resilience framework and its effectiveness in our work with young people and families in the community of Newport. With a focus on mental wellbeing, the resilience framework has been applied to practice with families utilising an action research approach. All aspects of resilience theory and practice has been, and continues to be, explored during the day to day practice of the team, shaping the support provision for families who experience complex adversity, alongside dealing with mental health problems. The framework has been adapted to include a holistic view of resilience within a family unit, highlighting the importance of group dynamics and relationships for the promotion and sustainability of resilience. Key input of families has enabled our practice to focus on the operational challenges that families face on a day to day basis. ‘By designing the services that met the needs of our son and us as his parents, were invaluable. This service is a need’ - a parent of a young person experiencing low mood/ self-esteem. Families highlighted the ease of use of the framework due to its design; however highlight the need for adaptation of the terminology for use as a family unit. The partnership provides opportunities for practitioners to focus support provision on theory based interventions that develop resilience in family units.

Presenters
SH

Sarah Henderson

Sarah Henderson is a Family Wellbeing and Resilience Worker at the mental health charity Newport Mind, in partnership with the University of Brighton and the Families First government initiative in Newport, South Wales. She graduated with a BSc Psychology degree in 2012 and has since... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Validation of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) with a French-speaking Canadian sample
Abstract #319
Validation of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) With a French-Ppeaking Canadian Sample
Presenter: Nathalie Parent Co - Presenters: Odin Hjemdal, Martine Hebert  
Abstract:
Resilience can take a variety of meanings but it’s mostly associated with the ability to maintain normal functioning despite adversity (Rutter, 2000). In the past decade, great efforts were made to define the construct but few measurement scales of resilience were developed (Naglieri & LeBuffe, 2005). In a methodological review of available instruments, Windle, Bennett and Noyes (2011) concluded that the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA; Hjemdal, Friborg, Martinussen, & Rosenvinge, 2001) is one of the most relevant. The main objective of this study is to validate the use of the RSA with a French-speaking Canadian population. Moderator effects of resilience on symptomatology are also investigated. 750 French-speaking students at University Laval (Quebec, Canada) completed the RSA and measures of related variables such as early trauma experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychological well-being. Participants also completed the Conner-Davidson Resilience scale (Conner & Davidson, 2003). Confirmatory factorial analyses and reliability analyses were conducted. Alpha coefficients of the subscales range from 0.70 to 0.90. Significant correlations are observed with measures of construct-related variables. Hierarchical regression analyses show that some dimensions of the RSA have a main effect on PTSD symptoms, while others have a buffering effect depending on early trauma experiences. This study supports the cross-cultural validity of the RSA. The relevance of dimensions-level analyses of resilience effects on symptomatology is also highlighted.

Presenters
NP

Nathalie Parent

Psychologist - National University of ColombiaMaster of Mental Health - University of AntioquiaInvestigator and professor of the research line on resilience and positive development of the National School of Public Health at the University of Antioquia, coordinator of the observatory... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents... Read More →
MH

Martine Hébert

Martine Hébert (Ph.D. in psychology) is professor at the sexology department of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She has training in child development and child clinical psychology as well as a strong background in psychometry. In the past 25 years, her research interests... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Violence Prevention Program For At Risk Youth In Guatemala
Abstract #283
Violence Prevention Program for At Risk Youth in Guatemala 
Presenter: Tannia Castaneda  
Abstract:
The purpose of this poster is to show counseling and mental health interventions conducted in a technical education program with at risk youth. The young people who joined the program, from identified “red zones”, immerse in a context of adversity such as high rates of violence, poverty and lack of opportunities in Guatemala. Despite the difficult environment that the youth face, they choose to pursue education to obtain technical degrees. The program included the participation of two cohorts of students enrolled in a 2-year Computer-Programming Plan, parents and key personnel at the educational institution. Through workshops in topics of self-awareness, problem solving, personal life project, group and individual counseling, they revealed information about resources and influences that had been helpful for them to overcome adversity. Students’ perception was recollected before and after the counseling interventions with a Furlong’s well-being scale. Based on results from the program, this poster would also present suggestions for future steps to make research on resilience to explore in depth the experiences of these young students to understand their protective processes, roles of families, schools, culture and community that lead them to look for self-improvement while others in the same context of adversity do not.

Presenters
avatar for Tannia Lopez De Castaneda

Tannia Lopez De Castaneda

Applied Psychology PhD Candidate, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala
Specialist with work experience in violence prevention, socio-emotional learning and organizational change and counseling. Educational background includes counseling in psychology, business and educational settings.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

What Youth Need To Do Well! Lessons From Youth
Abstract #269
What Youth Need to do Well! Lessons From Youth
Presenter: Mallery Denny
Abstract:
"The hand-drum is the beat of the soul; the eagle is the guide through our path; we unite as a team of speakers, as we mumble but never stumble. We are our people." These words are included in a mural on a community wall in Eskasoni, Canada. The mural shows what we have learned through the Spaces and Places Research Project (S&P) about what young people like us, in OU.R. Eskasoni, need to do well. We use the mural to share this knowledge with our community -- the people who support us to do better. Join us at the Spaces and Places poster display where you can see the mural and talk with us about what we believe young people in rural communities, and elsewhere, need to do well. We will also share with researchers what they need to know to do better research with young people like us. We will tell them what we enjoyed and found useful about participating in research; and what we didn't enjoy, what should have been different. We'll let them know what was hard, but what motivated us to stick it out, and care about the research project and how it could help us, and the young people who come after us.

Presenters
MD

Mallery Denny

Mallery Denny, Youth Support Worker, Eskasoni Mental Health Service (EMHS), has worked in mental health with EMHS for the past 6 years with experience in youth support and crisis work. Mallery has also been involved in research collaborations and played a key role in the Spaces and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Who Is Supporting Resilience In Refugee Youth And Families? A Case Study Of The Peaceful Village
Abstract #281
Who is Supporting Resilience in Refugee Youth and Families? A Case Study of the Peaceful Village
Presenter: Stephanie Yamniuk
Abstract:
The purpose of this phenomenological study is to explore the sociocultural and contextual factors that either hinder or promote the resilience of refugee youth. Special attention will be made to the contextual factors of the individual, the family and cultural impacts, and the Peaceful Village's impact on eight developing refugee youth as they adapt to a new community, and experience aspects of risk and resilience.

 


Presenters
avatar for Stephanie Yamniuk

Stephanie Yamniuk

Doctoral Candidate and Sessional Instructor, University of Manitoba
Stephanie Yamniuk is an instructor at the University of Manitoba, focusing on children’s rights, family resilience, cross-cultural education, and relationships between schools and diverse families. She was a guest speaker on the child’s rights to participate at the Centre for... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College