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Tuesday, June 16
 

7:00am

Pathways to Resilience III: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture Conference Start
With more than 150 paper presentations, more than 60 poster presentations and over 50 facilitated discussions be sure to come to registration early and enjoy some breakfast while you wait! 
(Registration and Breakfast start at 7:30)


Tuesday June 16, 2015 7:00am - 8:00am
King's College King's College

7:05am

Conference Registration
With 10 pre-conference workshops being held at King's College, come enjoy the University, the people and the presentations!


Tuesday June 16, 2015 7:05am - 3:00pm
NAB, 1st Floor King's College

7:30am

Breakfast
Come and grab some breakfast while waiting to register for the event! 


Tuesday June 16, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
King's College King's College

8:30am

Pre-Conference Concurrent Workshops - Morning
Come to some amazing workshops given by inspiring presenters, including:

Collaborative Resilience Research for Community Benefit: Nurturing Possibililites
Presenter: Angie Hart

Measuring Resilience: Availible Measures and Key Considerations
Presenter: Linda Liebenberg

The Proffessional Helper's Resilience
Presenter: Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe

Transforamtive Mixed Methods Research to Study Resilience
Presenter: Donna Mertens

We All Grow Older! Resilience and Aging
Presenter: Gill Windle 

Presenters
avatar for Angie Hart

Angie Hart

Angie Hart is Professor of Child, Family and Community Health at the University of Brighton and has been working on resilience research and practice for 10 years. She is an advisor to England’s Big Lottery Fund, Angie runs boingboing, a not for profit undertaking resilience research and practice development. http://www.boingboing.org.uk/index.php/who-are-we/angie-hart. She is the Academic Director of the University of Brighton’s Community... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe

Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe

Pilar Hernández-Wolfe is tenured associate professor and teaches in the Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy program. She is a licensed family therapist and a licensed clinical professional counselor, a clinical member and approved supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and a consultant and trainer. In addition, she served as board member of the American Family Therapy Academy and is a member of the... Read More →
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda is a methodologist, whose research examines the use of both image-based methods and mixed method research designs. She also considers how these facilitate an understanding of young people in marginalised contexts, as well as how these data inform instrument development. She has published and presented internationally on resilience related themes relevant to the understanding of youth across cultures and contexts. Her publications include... Read More →
avatar for Donna Mertens

Donna Mertens

Donna M. Mertens is Professor in the Department of Education at Gallaudet University. She teaches research methods and program evaluation to deaf and hearing students at the MA and PhD levels. She conducts research and evaluation studies on such topics as improvement of special education services in international settings, planning for the inclusion of students with disabilities in neighborhood schools, enhancing the educational experiences... Read More →
avatar for Gill Windle

Gill Windle

Qualifications: PhD Psychology University of Wales, Bangor MSc Methods in Psychological Research University of Wales, Bangor BSc (hons) Psychology with Health Psychology University of Wales, Bangor Research Interests: Mental health and resilience in later life; creativity and ageing; the interplay between the individual and their physical, social and environmental contexts on well-being and quality of life.


Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
King's College King's College

8:30am

Angie Hart: Collaborative Resilience Research For Community Benefit: Nurturing Possibilities
Putting Resilience Theory into Practice in Communities
Speaker: Angie Hart
Abstract:
Psychologist Ann Masten summarises the developments in resilience research that led to a shift from studies focusing on internalised conceptions of personal resilience to wider ecological approaches. She calls these, the fourth wave. However, is it now time for an ‘official’ fifth wave which draws together collaborative resilience research, practice, community development and activism? If so, what would this look like and have any of us yet managed to bring it about? If you are already doing work like this yourself, or want to in the future, this workshop will be an opportunity to learn how to maximise your impact and connect more with others doing fifth wave work. In this workshop participants will:
Consider ways of doing resilience research that share research goals, processes, publications and financial resources between researchers and communities.
Critically evaluate resilience research from participatory, social justice and activist perspectives.
Learn how to develop a community of practice for resilience research and practice.
Explore how academic authority and privilege can be harnessed for community benefit.
Learn how to overcome some of the challenges of doing participatory and/or activist resilience research.
Profile or plan their own participatory and/or activist resilience research.

Speakers
avatar for Angie Hart

Angie Hart

Angie Hart is Professor of Child, Family and Community Health at the University of Brighton and has been working on resilience research and practice for 10 years. She is an advisor to England’s Big Lottery Fund, Angie runs boingboing, a not for profit undertaking resilience research and practice development. http://www.boingboing.org.uk/index.php/who-are-we/angie-hart. She is the Academic Director of the University of Brighton’s Community... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

8:30am

CANCELLED: Resilience and Aging (Gill Windle and Laurie McCubbin)
Dr. Laurie McCubbin will NOT be replacing Dr. Gill Windle's talk on adult resilience. Both sessions have been cancelled.

Presenters
LM

Laurie McCubbin

Dr. Laurie “Lali” McCubbin, Associate Professor in counseling psychology, is an indigenous/multiracial scholar at Washington State University. Her research involves: resilience and well-being among indigenous peoples and people of color, cultural identity development, and stress and coping processes among multiracial families. She is the past Co-Chair of the Center of Mestizo and Indigenous Research and Engagement and served as... Read More →


Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

8:30am

Donna Mertens: Transformative Mixed Methods Research to Study Resilience
Transformative Mixed Methods Research to Study Resilience
Speaker: Donna Mertens
This workshop focuses on providing participants with a framework for thinking about planning, implementing, and using mixed methods research with marginalized communities. The transformative approach to mixed methods research incorporates the goals of furthering human rights and social justice by recognizing and supporting the resilience of members of marginalized communities. Dr. Mertens will share examples of transformative mixed methods resilience research from diverse contexts, including programs designed to serve women, people with disabilities, deaf people, and racial/ethnic minorities. Strategies that are culturally responsive that have a high potential to lead to transformative change will be illustrated. Participants will have an opportunity to apply strategies to design transformative mixed methods research to a case study and to discuss applications of these strategies in their own work.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Mertens

Donna Mertens

Donna M. Mertens is Professor in the Department of Education at Gallaudet University. She teaches research methods and program evaluation to deaf and hearing students at the MA and PhD levels. She conducts research and evaluation studies on such topics as improvement of special education services in international settings, planning for the inclusion of students with disabilities in neighborhood schools, enhancing the educational experiences... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

8:30am

Linda Liebenberg: Measuring Resilience: Available Measures and Key Considerations
Measuring Resilience: Available Measures and Key Considerations
Speaker: Linda Liebenberg
While the measurement of resilience is a relatively new field, there are an increasing number of measures available to researchers. In selecting an instrument, researchers are confronted by a host of questions not least of which include the reliability and validity of the measure as well as the measure’s relevance to the study question. This workshop will present an overview of resilience scales available for use in quantitative research. This workshop will highlight the scope of available options together with strengths and caveats to be aware of in selecting instruments for use. The workshop will consider the development and validation of various instruments, the populations for which they have been developed and the resilience components they are best suited to measure. The workshop will also highlight key components for researchers to take into consideration when selecting measures for use in research.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda is a methodologist, whose research examines the use of both image-based methods and mixed method research designs. She also considers how these facilitate an understanding of young people in marginalised contexts, as well as how these data inform instrument development. She has published and presented internationally on resilience related themes relevant to the understanding of youth across cultures and contexts. Her publications include... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

8:30am

Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe: The Professional Helper's Resilience
Vicarious Resiliency in Cultural Context
Speaker: Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe
Therapists working with traumatized populations may experience the impact of their clients’ emotional pain in the process of providing therapy. They may also learn vicariously from their clients about overcoming adversity. The concept of vicarious resilience describes a specific resilience process occurring as a result of therapists’ work with trauma survivors. It refers to the transformations in the therapists’ inner experience resulting from empathetic engagement with the client’s trauma material. To date, vicarious resilience has only been researched in the traumatic stress field and it may be a unique consequence of trauma work. Vicarious trauma and vicarious resilience are processes that illuminate the complex potential for therapeutic work both to fatigue and to heal. In addition, these processes develop in the social and cultural context of the therapeutic relationship. Intersections of diversity (class, gender identity, sexual orientation, ethnicity, ability) shape therapy practice in general and therapeutic encounters specifically. These dimensions are explored as they apply to therapeutic practices to offer therapists a cultural equity framework in which to understand vicarious trauma and vicarious resilience.

Speakers
avatar for Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe

Pilar Hernandez-Wolfe

Pilar Hernández-Wolfe is tenured associate professor and teaches in the Marriage, Couple, and Family Therapy program. She is a licensed family therapist and a licensed clinical professional counselor, a clinical member and approved supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, and a consultant and trainer. In addition, she served as board member of the American Family Therapy Academy and is a member of the... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

10:30am

Break
Enjoy a quick snack before more exciting workshops!


Tuesday June 16, 2015 10:30am - 10:50am
King's College King's College

10:50am

Pre-Conference Concurrent Workshops - Morning Continued
Enjoy the rest of the pre-conference morning workshops!


Tuesday June 16, 2015 10:50am - 12:30pm
King's College King's College

12:30pm

Lunch Break
If you haven't already purchased a lunch pass there is lunch available in Alex Hall for $14.50. 

What's for lunch?
4 Cheese Pasta
Chicken Broccoli Stirfry on Rice
Falafel Pita Sandwhiches
French Fries, Peas 


Tuesday June 16, 2015 12:30pm - 1:30pm
King's College King's College

1:30pm

Pre-Conference Concurrent Workshops - Afternoon
Enjoy an afternoon of pre-conference workshops presented by the leaders in their fields!
Presentations include:

Cross-Cultural Measurement of Protective Factors
Presenter: Fons van de Vijver

Diagnosing, Nurturing, and Facilititating Resilience Across Cultures and Contexts
Presenter: Michael Ungar

Resilience and People With Disabilities
Presenter: Robyn Mundford

Resilience in the Schools: Understanding and Fostering Positive Adaptation in At-Risk Students
Presenter: Amity Noltemeyer

Using Visual Methods to Study Resilience
Presenters: Linda Theron, Linda Liebenberg 

Presenters
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg, PhD., Co-Director Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, is a researcher and evaluator with a core interest in children and youth with complex needs. Her work explores the promotion of positive youth development and mental health, using formal and informal processes of resilience, through both evaluation of service provision and research of youth experiences. As a key component of this work, Linda reflects... Read More →
avatar for Linda Theron

Linda Theron

Linda Theron, D.Ed. (Educational Psychology), is professor in the Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, South Africa. Her research explores why, and how, some South African youth adjust well to poverty, orphanhood, and/or learning difficulties, and how sociocultural contexts shape these processes of resilience (see www.Lindatheron.org / www.optentia.co.za). She publishes and presents internationally on related themes. In 2013, she... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Robyn Munford

Robyn Munford

Professor of Social Work. Key areas of interest are: social and community work practice, theory and research; community development; disability; strengths and citizenship approaches; reflective practice; children, youth and families; family support and wellbeing; bicultural frameworks; research methodologies; action research; and, strategies for translating research findings into practice. The focus of Robyn's work over the last two decades has... Read More →
avatar for Amity Noltemeyer

Amity Noltemeyer

Degrees: Ph.D., Kent State University | Ed.S., Miami University | M.S., Miami University | B.S., Xavier University
avatar for Michael Ungar

Michael Ungar

Dr. Michael Ungar wears many professional hats. He is equally well known as the author of books for parents and caregivers as he is for his world-renowned research on the topic of resilience. As a writer he has adapted ideas from his research and clinical practice into best selling works like Too Safe For Their Own Good: How Risk and Responsibility Help Teens Thrive, and his most recent release, I Still Love You: Nine Things... Read More →
avatar for Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver

Professor at Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands | Fons van de Vijver holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia. He has (co-)authored over 400 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. He is a former editor of the Journal of... Read More →


Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
King's College King's College

1:30pm

Amity Noltemeyer: Resilience in the Schools: Understanding and Fostering Positive Adaptation in At-Risk Students
Resilience in the Schools: Understanding and Fostering Positive Adaptation in At-Risk Students
Speaker: Amity Noltemeyer
Children and adolescents worldwide enter classrooms having experienced a diverse array of adversities and vulnerabilities. Considering the shared goal of school-based professionals to foster success in all students, how can resilience research be harnessed to establish nurturing school environments that buffer these risks and support positive development? This presentation will focus on school-based resilience promotion, equipping attendees with skills to support resilience processes at both a student level and systems level. Attendees will learn about mechanisms undergirding resilience in at-risk students, with a specific focus on risk and protective factors relevant within the school setting. Recommendations for school-based practice emerging from this research-based understanding of resilience will be emphasized. Specifically, a tiered model of school-based prevention and intervention – one that addresses multiple systems of influence, matches supports to students based on their unique risk and protective factors, and uses data to drive decision-making – will be highlighted. Opportunities for interaction, dialogue, case study review, and reflection will be incorporated into the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Amity Noltemeyer

Amity Noltemeyer

Degrees: Ph.D., Kent State University | Ed.S., Miami University | M.S., Miami University | B.S., Xavier University

Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

1:30pm

Fons van de Vijver: Cross-Cultural Measurement of Protective Factors
Cross-Cultural Measurement of Protective Factors
Speaker: Fons van de Vijver
Much work on resilience is cross-cultural in nature and compares data from different countries or includes culturally heterogeneous samples. In this workshop I will deal with protective factors from three domains (Zautra, Hall, & Murray, 2010): (1) individual characteristics, such as intelligence and personality; (2) characteristics of families, such as family support; and (3) the larger social context, such as cultural norms. On the basis of examples of these measures, measurement issues are illustrated. Both qualitative and quantitative measures and their very different quality assessment procedures are described. It will be illustrated how quantitative measures have more rigorous assessment quality procedures than qualitative measures. The purpose of the workshop is to introduce a way of thinking about scientific research in which assessment of instrument quality is a crucial element.

Speakers
avatar for Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver

Professor at Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands | Fons van de Vijver holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia. He has (co-)authored over 400 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. He is a former editor of the Journal of... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

1:30pm

Linda Liebenberg and Linda Theron: Using Visual Methods to Study Resilience
Arts-Based Approaches to Understanding Youth Resilience in Culturally Sensitive Ways
Speakers: Linda Theron, Linda Liebenberg 
In this workshop we draw on our collective experience to showcase, and critique, a range of visual participatory methodologies (including draw-and-talk, photo elicitation, participatory video, and clay-modelling) that have supported our researching of resilience with youth from diverse cultures and contexts. We foreground the salience of participants’ and researchers’ cultural ties to the choice of methodology, as well as analyses and dissemination strategies. We include the opportunity for workshop participants to reflect, visually, on the cultural strengths, limitations, and biases they bring to the use of arts-based approaches in their own studies of resilience.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda is a methodologist, whose research examines the use of both image-based methods and mixed method research designs. She also considers how these facilitate an understanding of young people in marginalised contexts, as well as how these data inform instrument development. She has published and presented internationally on resilience related themes relevant to the understanding of youth across cultures and contexts. Her publications include... Read More →
avatar for Linda Theron

Linda Theron

I explore why and how South African youth, who have been placed at risk for negative life outcomes, resile. In our social ecology many young South Africans are placed at risk by multiple challenges (think of poverty, HIV&AIDS, child-headed households, escalating divorce rates, ineffective schooling, and so forth). These challenges are likely to remain with us for many years to come, and so it is imperative that we learn more about how and why... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

1:30pm

Michael Ungar: Diagnosing, Nurturing, and Facilitating Resilience Across Cultures and Contexts
Diagnosing, Nurturing, and Facilitating Resilience Across Cultures and Contexts
Speaker: Michael Ungar
With growing interest in resilience among mental health care providers, there is a need for a simple way to think about the complex interactions that predict which children will do well despite the seriousness of the challenges they face. A focus on resilience helps us to understand children’s individual adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies, as well as the social and physical ecologies that facilitate processes associated with resilience. Using case examples of children who have been exposed to high levels of adversity such as family violence, mental illness of a child or caregiver, natural disasters, forced migration, poverty, racism and other types of social marginalization and political conflict, Michael will show how we can assess childhood resilience and use that assessment to guide practice. He will show that by “diagnosing” resilience, we are in a better position to design interventions that are sensitive to the individual, family, school and community factors that influence a child’s wellbeing. Nine factors common to children who cope well under adversity and avoid problems like depression, PTSD, and delinquency will be discussed. This presentation will also explore ways we can intervene to help children cope by changing the social and physical environments that surround them.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Ungar

Michael Ungar

Dr. Michael Ungar wears many professional hats. He is equally well known as the author of books for parents and caregivers as he is for his world-renowned research on the topic of resilience. As a writer he has adapted ideas from his research and clinical practice into best selling works like Too Safe For Their Own Good: How Risk and Responsibility Help Teens Thrive, and his most recent release, I Still Love You: Nine Things... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

1:30pm

Robyn Munford: Resilience and People with Disabilities
People with Disabilities – Creating Opportunities for Resilience
Speaker: Robyn Munford
This workshop will explore how we can work alongside people with disabilities to create opportunities for resilience. Central to this approach is learning how to build meaningful and enduring partnerships that enable a sense of belonging and that achieve full inclusion and participation in communities. A key focus is on understanding the significant role of support networks including family members, support workers, friends, and community resources. Strengths and citizenship approaches are explored in this workshop. Such approaches accentuate the need to understand the diversity of experience and maintain a focus on how support systems and services can strive to uphold the rights and wellbeing of people with disabilities. The workshop will present a framework that has been used in communities to create respectful and authentic partnerships between people with disabilities and their support networks. This framework takes account of meaning systems, context and experience. Taking an ecological approach to resilience, it focuses on the interaction between the person and their environment and the factors that promote inclusion and full participation of people with disabilities in community life.

Speakers
avatar for Robyn Munford

Robyn Munford

Professor of Social Work. Key areas of interest are: social and community work practice, theory and research; community development; disability; strengths and citizenship approaches; reflective practice; children, youth and families; family support and wellbeing; bicultural frameworks; research methodologies; action research; and, strategies for translating research findings into practice. The focus of Robyn's work over the last two decades has... Read More →

Tuesday June 16, 2015 1:30pm - 5:30pm
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

3:30pm

Break
Take a quick break, talk with some colleages and get ready for more workshops!


Tuesday June 16, 2015 3:30pm - 3:50pm
King's College King's College

3:50pm

Pre-Conference Concurrent Workshops - Afternoon Continued

Tuesday June 16, 2015 3:50pm - 5:30pm
King's College King's College
 
Wednesday, June 17
 

7:00am

Conference Registration
Come early in order to beat the lineups for registration!
Today is the first day of Paper and Facilitated Discussion presentations and you don't want to miss a thing! 


Wednesday June 17, 2015 7:00am - 3:00pm
NAB, 1st Floor King's College

7:30am

Breakfast
Enjoy an appetizing breakfast before starting your day at Pathways to Resilience III: Beyond Nature vs. Nurture!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
King's College King's College

8:30am

Opening Ceremonies
Have a great time at our opening ceremonies complete with highlight performances and keynote presentations!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 8:30am - 9:30am
Alumni Hall/KTS NAB 1st/2nd Floor, King's College

9:30am

Keynote by Dr. Bruce Ellis "Beyond Allostatic Load: Rethinking the Role of Stress in Regulating Child Development and Resilience"
Beyond Allostatic Load: Rethinking the Role of Stress in Regulating Child Development and Resilience
Speaker: Bruce J. Ellis
How do exposures to stress, such as repeated or chronic childhood adversity, affect social and cognitive functioning? The usual answer to this question highlights impairments to growth, learning, and behavior. This approach emphasizes “What’s wrong with youth?” who come from harsh environments. In this talk Dr. Ellis instead takes a strength-based approach and asks: “What’s right with these youth?” Guided by evolutionary-developmental models of biological sensitivity to context and adaptive calibration, he will discuss how youth who develop in harsh environments specialize their stress physiology, social and reproductive development, and cognitive abilities to match high-adversity contexts. He will also argue that we need to understand the coherent, functional biobehavioral changes that occur in response to stress over time to better understand the potential cost of these changes (e.g., stress-related physical and mental illness).

Keynotes
avatar for Bruce Ellis

Bruce Ellis

As an iconoclast in my youth, and someone who was always attracted to big ideas, I developed a strong interest in evolutionary psychology—the idea that Darwin’s great theory could help explain human psychology and behavior.  I knew that I was on to something when I gave my very first classroom presentation on this topic (in an undergraduate Sociology of Sex Roles class at Cal Poly); it caused such a stir that the professor... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 9:30am - 10:30am
Alumni Hall/KTS NAB 1st/2nd Floor, King's College

10:30am

Break
Meet new people and explore our beautiful King's College!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
King's College King's College

11:00am

Concurrent Paper Presentations and Facilitated Discussions
Hear presentations by hundreds of presenters including Linda Theron, Geraldine Oades-Sese, and Emily Colpitts to name a few on topics such as Resilience in Cultural Context, Prmoting Helath in LGBTQ Youth, and Children in Care.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
King's College King's College

11:00am

Gender & Sexuality - Steve Leventhal, Saima Hirani, Jane March-McDonald, Martine Hébert
Gender & Sexuality: 

Abstract # 26
Bringing Resilience to the Global Health and Development Community: The Case of Girls First – India
Presenter: Steve Leventhal  Co - Presenters: Jane Gillham, Katherine Leventhal 
Abstract:
Mental Health Interventions Adolescents, Girls, International Development, Global Health, Intervention Today, 600 million girls live in low and middle income countries (LMICs). In part due to intense and entrenched gender-based discrimination, girls in these countries are significantly and almost uniformly less likely than their male counterparts to be educated, employed, and physically healthy.Over the last decade, many prominent actors in global health and development have adopted policies and programs to improve physical health, education, and employability for girls in LMICS (e.g., WHO, World Bank, UNICEF, etc.). However, there is a critical link that is missing: attention to resilience, and in particular, to psychosocial resilience. In this community, few have focused on building social-emotional assets (e.g., persistence, self-efficacy, strong ties with adults, etc.) as a key lever for improving physical health and education for girls.In this presentation we discuss how Girls First–India, a 2013-14 RCT of a combined resilience/adolescent health intervention among 3,400 rural adolescent girls in Bihar, India, has brought resilience into global health and development discussions among foundations and governments. We present strategies we have used in engaging with multiple stakeholders, challenges we have encountered, and lessons we have learned about the synergies of the field of resilience and the fields of global health and development. 

Abstract # 46
Viewing Women’s Resilience through a Gendered Lens:  A Critical Review
Presenter: Saima Hirani Co - Presenters: Gerri Lasiuk, Kathleen Hegadoren
Abstract:
Although it has been the subject of study for several decades, resilience research is beset with definitional and methodological issues that make it difficult to operationalize and measure resilience, compare findings across studies, and perform meta-analyses. In this presentation, we present findings of a critical review of the literature, which was motivated by the hypothesis that current conceptualizations of and methods for measuring resilience lack gender sensitivity. Data for the review was gleaned from electronic searches of CINAHL, MEDLINE, Science Direct, and PubMed using the search terms ‘resilience’, ‘adaptability’, ‘psychological constructs similar to resilience’, ‘women’, ‘gender’, and ‘gender based analyses’. Hand searches of references lists yielded additional literature. Data sources were limited to materials published in the English language between 1979 and 2014. Based on our findings, we argue that most current measures of resilience do not take into account gender-related social and environmental experiences that may contribute to the oft reported higher resilience scores in men. These gaps threaten the quality of evidence regarding women’s resilience and the development of strategies to support resilience in women. These limitations have practical implications for women’s health and healthcare.

Abstract # 50
Negotiating Transition to a ‘Grown Up World’: The Journey to Sexual and Reproductive Health for Unaccompanied Adolescent Asylum Seekers 
Presenter:Jane March-McDonald Co-Presenter: Cathy Brennan
Abstract:
Unaccompanied asylum seekers (UAS) around the world face increased risks in relation to sexual and reproductive health outcomes in the country of asylum due to: the loss of strong supportive structures and social networks, the absence of parental protection, cultural attitudes, poor knowledge of and lack of access to relevant services, as well as the need for these young people to prioritize immediate problems over sexual and reproductive health. Having negotiated the often dangerous and highly challenging journey of seeking asylum in the Western world, the resilience of UAS is clearly evident. How though do they subsequently manage and negotiate the transition from childhood to adulthood, identifying and securing resilient pathways to sexual and reproductive health, in a context marked by transition, uncertainty and cultural alienation? How might the communities they reside in and the available resources, shape their journeys and outcomes? The ethical and methodological challenges of carrying out research with this population are well documented. To identify and understand culturally specific and universal resilient pathways for sexual and reproductive health, we need to successfully engage UAS in research through using new and creative methodologies. Having secured a Worldwide Universities Development Fund grant, we welcome contributions and interest on our venture.

Abstract # 45

The Forgotten Victims Of Child Sexual Abuse: Disclosure And Resilience Features In Male Youth
Presenter: Martine Hébert Co - Presenters: Christine Wekerle, Isabelle Daigneault, Delphine Collin-Vézina
Abstract:
Child sexual abuse is now recognized as an important public health issue. Prevalence estimates reveal that 1 out of five women and 1 out of ten men report experiencing sexual abuse before the age of 18. Yet, sexual abuse and sexual violence against male youth often remains hidden, as male youth are less likely to disclose to anyone and less likely to seek services. Consequently, there are significant gaps in the scholarly literature as to the outcomes and possible resilience of male youth with sexual abuse experiences. Discussants in this panel will highlight findings from their recent studies as to the specific obstacles in disclosing sexual abuse experiences identified by male victims as well as the features associated with resilience in school-aged boys victims of sexual abuse. In addition, resilience characteristics of high school male adolescents experiencing sexual abuse and of child-welfare involved male adolescents experiencing sexual violence in the context of dating relationships will be summarized. This facilitated discussion will offer a unique opportunity to exchange as to the specific challenges in this area of investigation and the design of future investigations and tailored intervention addressing the needs of male youth victims of sexual abuse.


Presenters
avatar for Jane March-McDonald

Jane March-McDonald

Lecturer Public Health/ Programme Lead Specialist Community Public Health Nursing/Researcher, University of southampton
Jane is a nurse, midwife and health visitor and is currently lecturer and programme lead for the Specialist Community Public Health Nursing programme in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton. Jane's research interests include: the health and wellbeing of marginalized and vulnerable populations, resilience risk and protection and cross-cultural research. Jane’s PhD study explored the nature and role of resilience in forced... Read More →
MH

Martine Hébert

Martine Hébert (Ph.D. in psychology) is professor at the sexology department of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She has training in child development and child clinical psychology as well as a strong background in psychometry. In the past 25 years, her research interests have focused on the consequences associated with interpersonal trauma. She has published research papers documenting the diversity of... Read More →
SH

Saima Hirani

Ms. Hirani is a nurse by profession. She is presently pursuing PhD in nursing at University of Alberta. Her PhD dissertation focuses on promoting resilience in women living in disadvantaged areas. For last ten years, she has been involved teaching mental health, research, and bio-statistics to nursing students. Her clinical experience includes working with people with mental health issues in a diverse context. She has facilitated several sessions... Read More →
avatar for Steve Leventhal

Steve Leventhal

Executive Director, CorStone
As CorStone’s executive director, Steve Leventhal oversees all strategic planning, program development, external relations, and financial operations for the organization. Prior to joining CorStone, he oversaw strategic alliances, private-public partnerships, marketing and communications, and fundraising for the Fritz Institute as Director, External Relations. Previously, Steve was a consultant at Population Services International, where... Read More →

Co-Presenters
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Cathy Brennan

Cathy is a Lecturer in Public Health based in the Leeds Institute of Health Sciences and is currently Programme Lead for the Masters in Public Health Programme. Cathy’s research interests include well-being in children and families and how social factors
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Delphine Collin-Vezina

Dr. at McGill University | Dr. Delphine Collin-Vézina is the Tier II Canadian Child Welfare Research Chair, an Associate Professor in Social Work at McGill University, and the director of the McGill Centre for Research on Children and Families. She is a clinical and developmental psychologist with a strong interest in child welfare and child maltreatment. She completed a postdoctoral degree on the short- and long-term consequences of... Read More →
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Isabelle Daigneault

Dr at Université de Montréal | Isabelle Daigneault, (Ph.D. in psychology), clinical psychologist, is an associate professor in the department of psychology at the Université de Montréal. For the past 15 years, her research has focused on child and adolescent sexual assault. She has a
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Jane Gillham

Associate Professor at Swarthmore | Dr. Jane Gillham is a psychologist, researcher, and educator. She is Associate Professor at Swarthmore College and Research Associate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Center. Dr. Gillham co-directs the Penn Resiliency Project and the Positive Psychology for Youth Project.For the past 20 years, Dr. Gillham's research has focused on developing and evaluating school-based... Read More →
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Dr. Kathleen Hegadoren

Professor at University of Alberta | Dr Hegadoren completed her PhD in Medical Sciences in 1995. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship and working as a clinical researcher in mood disorders, she accepted a tenure-track position at the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta. She was awarded full professorship in 2007 and currently hold a Tier II Canada Research Chair in Stress Disorders in Women (2005-2015). Her area of research... Read More →
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Gerri Lasiuk

Associate Profesor at University of Alberta | Dr. Gerri Lasiuk is an Associate Professor and Director or the Nursing Simulation Centre in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta. Her clinical, teaching, and research interest relate to psychiatric/ mental health nursing, particularly the relationship of childhood adversity to adult health; perinatal mental health; trauma-informed healthcare; and the use of simulation in teaching... Read More →
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Katherine Leventhal

Kate Leventhal serves as Research and Program Coordinator for Girls First – India, managing all research efforts for this resilience-based program that helps girls in poverty to improve their circumstances and achieve their dreams. Kate joined CorStone in 2011 after working with BasicNeeds UK in Kenya on some of the first community mental health programs in that country. Kate graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in 2009 with... Read More →
avatar for Christine Wekerle

Christine Wekerle

Dr at McMaster University | Christine Wekerle, is associate professor at Department of Pediatrics – Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University. She is the lead investigator in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) funded Boys’ and Men’s Health Team grant. Her epidemiological and clinical research covers the key construct areas of: self-harm, mental health, violence, substance abuse, and Aboriginal/First... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Seminar 7 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

11:00am

Mental Health - Wen-Chih Tseng, Genevieve Chandler, Bertha Fountain, Anna Demetrakopoulos, Ashley Frerichs, Srividya Iyer
Mental Health:

Abstract #28
Lego Serious Play Applications to Enhance the Development of Narrative Identity in Economically Vulnerable College Students
Presenter: Wen-Chih Tseng
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to present a specific applications of the LEGO Serious Play (LSP) methodology that has been designed to enhance the development of narrative identity and build resilience in economically vulnerable college students. LSP was invented at the end of the 1990s and was officially launched in 2002. In this study, I used LSP to design a thorough process that allows students to develop building skills through making simple Lego models, then leaded students into the complex world of metaphor. The design activities focus on seven particular episodes in the story of life; they include (1) Chapters of Life, (2) My Collections of Events, (3) Anticipated Future Scripts, (4) Difficult Challenges in Life, (5) Personal Beliefs and Values, (6) Life’s Central Themes and (7) the Past as Future – Participation Reflection. Students were asked to use LEGO bricks to build models representing their thoughts, reflections and ideas about the above seven activities. Findings showed that LSP as an intervention medium has a positive impact on enhancement in students’ narrative identity, which, in turn, weigh on the decrease in vulnerability including anxiety and depression and on the increase in resilience abilities.

Abstract #40
Resilience Intervention for Young Adults with Adverse Childhood Experiences
Presenter: Genevieve Chandler Co-Presenter: Mary Jane O’Conner
Abstract:
Background: Risk behaviors of alcohol and drug abuse, smoking and disordered eating can lead to addiction, anorexia and obesity. Often the result of adverse childhood experiences, such behaviors can lead to COPD, liver disease, diabetes and depression. Resilience researchers, however, pose the question, is risk resilience? Specific aim: Feasibility study of the Empower Resilience Intervention to interrupt the trajectory of ACE to illness. Method: A pre-test, post-test college students (n=28) repeated measure of ACE, symptoms, health behaviors and resilience. (RM-ANOVA) was performed to test the effect of the intervention, a strength based course using resilience and social learning theory with mindfulness, education, writing, mentoring and social support. Results: A statistically significant cohort by time interaction for physical activity with the intervention group and narrative themes: building strengths, reframing resilience and creating connections. No change evident in risk or resilience. Conclusion: These provocative trends are theoretically consistent with a strength-based approach. Fine tuning the intervention and using ecological resilience measure may increase health behaviors and decrease symptoms. Implications: With the ERI study and a course with individuals who dropped out of high school we witnessed mindfulness, authentic writing and safe relationships transform the past to a vision of a preferred future.

Abstract #42
Homeless Youth in College
Presenter: Bertha Fountain
Abstract:
Limited research exists to date on the capacity of homeless youth in college to successfully tolerate and manage their experiences of being homeless.  The purpose of this research project is to deepen our understanding of academic resilience among homeless young adults (ages 18-30) who attend college. The primary research question guiding this study is:  How do homeless youth in college define and describe their academic resilience? Secondary questions include:  What are the barriers and supports they experience as part of their academic journey and how do they negotiate them?  What do homeless youth describe as influencing their ability to pursue post-secondary education?
This study draws on constructivist grounded theory to examine resilience among homeless youth in college.  This includes the identification of the factors that are promotive and protective as well as those that present challenges and risk.   The study will further explore the presence of survival strategies and coping techniques that can protect and present risk to students who experience housing instability. Data collection will include individual, in-depth interviews and focus groups with self-identified homeless young adults who attend City University of New York colleges.   How to examine resilience in this context is the purpose of the facilitated discussion.

Abstract #1
Resiliency Map: A tool for individual and community dialogue about complex loss, change and transition
Presenter: Anna Demetrakopoulous Co-Presenter: Yvette Perreault
Abstract:
The Resiliency Map is a 5m by 5m floor cloth which uses a visual structure to represent aspects of individual and shared experience.  It depicts concentric circles:  Self, Relational, Organizational and Social and Political Context, which are intersected by two primary meridians, Motivation and Commitment and Shared Values.  People are invited to walk on the Map to support the telling of their complex stories.  The Map has been used in multiple contexts, including debriefing after significant losses and traumatic events, personal and organizational transitions, and to support organizational assessment, planning and evaluation. Through the inter-connected layers, people can sort through their own narrative structures and the make visible the tensions within their own experience and the multiple roles they may have in a situation.

Abstract #6
Communities Fostering Resilience - A Lived Experience
Presenter: Ashley Frerichs
Abstract:
Throughout my life I have experienced many struggles that have allowed for the development of high resilience which is something I consider to be a leading factor that has supported me to become the strong young adult I am today.  As part of the facilitated panel discussion in the area of community interventions, I will use my lived experiences to support the work of other panellist and incorporate first hand knowledge of different pathways to resilience, emphasising the imperative role my community played in helping me navigate tough times as well as in building my resilience. In particular, I found a great sense of belonging, many long-term supportive relationships and maybe most importantly an internal resilience that is unwavering. My community was my activists, my thing to lean on and my beacon of hope in a way that social service organizations were able replicate, however only in a short-term structured way; when I look at what got me (and is still getting me) to where I am and where I am going, it was and still is my community where I found my strength.

Abstract #23
How a Multi-Stakeholder Network is Seeking to Transform Canadian Youth Mental healthcarePresenter: Srividya Iyer
Abstract:
This presentation describes how a multi-stakeholder network is seeking to transform Canadian youth mental healthcare. Established with a five-year grant under CIHR’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research, the ACCESS Network serves youths aged 11 to 25 at 12 sites in six provinces and one territory that include Indigenous, immigrant and other at-risk populations. Creating ACCESS entailed engaging all key stakeholder groups (youth, family/carers, community organizations, service providers, researchers, policy/decision makers and Indigenous groups); achieving consensus on collectively defined core values and objectives; and understanding site-specific services and barriers. Major challenges were posed by stakeholders’ and sites’ divergent expectations, affiliations, geographies and realities. The common concerns of youths and families helped us negotiate these tensions and coalesce into a robust transformational base. The ACCESS approach stresses resilience through early detection; community engagement; youth and family participation in service design and provision; the facilitation of social reintegration; the provision of services in youth-friendly, stigma-reducing settings; and 72-hour response time targets. This approach is a product of our foundational engagement with stakeholders and the change we instituted in how we communicate and collaborate. 

Presenters
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Ashley Frerichs

Resiliency is something the Ashley has become all too familiar with as she navigated family and personal mental health, youth homelessness, foster care and many other trials and tribulations. Fortunately, through great community involvement and resilience Ashley has become an advocate for the voices and engagement of young people. In addition, Ashley was the 2012 youth leadership award recipient from the Representative for Children and Youth as... Read More →
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Bertha Fountain

Field Instructor for PROVE (Project for Opportunity in Veterans Education), Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College
Ms. Fountain is a seasoned Social Worker who has had extensive experience in managing programs and providing direct services to individuals and families experiencing homelessness. This includes specialized homeless populations (children and youth, those with HIV/AIDS and veterans). Through her doctoral studies at the City University of New York, Ms. Fountain has transitioned to research studies in higher education. Her research and professional... Read More →
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Genevieve Chandler

As a psychiatric-mental health nursing expert and nurse scientist, a consistent theme of my work has been empowerment beginning with my research on the nursing work environments to my studies on decreasing inpatient coercive practices of seclusion and restraint to resilience with low-income adolescents with adverse childhood experiences. Testing an intervention for young adults with ACE brings my work from tertiary care to a secondary... Read More →
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Wen-Chih Tseng

Wen-Chih Tseng is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at National Hsinchu University of Education, Taiwan. His research interests are in positive psychology, resilience and serious play.

Co-Presenters
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Mary Jane O'Conner

Wellness Educator at Holyoke Community College | I am a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) with over 25 years experience working with studentsfrom pre-K through adults who have had trauma histories. As a community college educator, my focus with my students is on strength based skill building.
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Yvette Perreault

AIDS Bereavement and Resiliency Program of Ontario


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Shatford Room A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

11:00am

Resilience & School Programs - Kingsley Hurlington, Zahide Alaca, Ulrike Graf, Sheena Brown, Chris Byron, Sara Truebridge
Resilience & School Programs:

Abstract # 22
Unstuffed! A School-Wide Strength-Based Teacher-Led Mental Health Conference. A Fresh Approach to a Resilience-Focused Mental Health Conference in a Secondary School Setting
Presenter: Kingsley Hurlington Co - Presenters: Ruth Marinelli, Eileen Dahl
Abstract:
An ecological framework of resilience posits the importance of environment in the development of resilience characteristics in individuals.  For teens, school can be one of the most important environments for bolstering resilience (Benard, 2006; Masten and Coatsworth, 1998).   School needs to provide students with an environment that assists them with learning and also facilitates the development of personal resilience characteristics through positive mentorship (Ungar 2004).  This program review explores the impact of a single mental health conference intervention on the strengthening of resilience characteristics in secondary school students.  In response to growing concerns about mental health issues in the adolescent population (Lam, 2014), a mental health conference was created that offered students sessions led by teacher-mentors at their school.  The results of student surveys indicated the significant effect of the intervention on their awareness of their own mental health challenges and that of their peers, increased confidence in negotiating their way to appropriate psychosocial supports, and deepened empathetic response to others in order to create a more positive and inclusive educational environment.  Teacher-mentors also indicated their increased capacity to assist students in navigating mental health supports in their school and community.

Abstract # 37
Resilience in High-Poverty Schools
Presenter: Zahide Alaca
Abstract:
One of the most consistent findings in the educational literature is the strong relationship between students’ socioeconomic backgrounds and their academic achievement. In Canada, performance on standardised assessments continues to be lower in schools serving high concentrations of students living in poverty compared to schools serving students from more affluent families. Interestingly, some schools serving primarily low-income communities have managed to support very high academic achievement among their students. In this presentation, I propose a comparative study of six elementary schools in Ontario, Canada, to understand how high-poverty schools manage to support high academic achievement among their students. Existing research on high-performing, high-poverty schools has focused primarily on identifying good practice at the classroom and school levels, but transferring these practices from school to school has proven difficult. I propose that there may be important factors, such as the social conditions and policy contexts in which each school are embedded, which may influence both the strategies that schools choose to implement and the effectiveness of those strategies. Of particular interest will be whether and how differences in access to non-school learning resources across school communities may play a role in these processes.

Abstract # 44
A “Gestalt”-Based Concept of Supporting Teachers Resilience. Examples of a Community of Practice Group at Osnabrück/Germany
Presenter: Ulrike Graf Co - Presenters: Ulrike Becker, Angie Hart
Abstract:
How best to lead a community of practice (CoP) that helps elementary and primary school teachers create new ways of supporting children with difficulties to develop resilience? And one that will also support the teachers’ in developing their own resilience alongside. At Osnabrück/Germany we are researching a Gestalt approach to addressing these issues. 
So what are the assumptions that we are testing out? First of all, concepts of Gestalt-based supervision should create opportunities for revealing the problems of all those involved, secondly we hope it will open up spaces for perceiving the perspective of the others and feelings of empathy while being aware of one’s own position and feelings; and thirdly it should facilitate broader insights into social and structural resources. 
Fourth is the idea that the Gestalt approach helps us treat everyone in the Community of Practice  with respect. Finally, we are hoping it will facilitate congruence with encounters between teachers, children with difficulties and everybody else involved beyond the CoP.
The Community of Practice Group at Osnabrück is part of the international Project, Imagine, coordinated by the University of Brighton/England. The presentation will present examples of ways to help teachers (re-)discover their individual competence of resilience.

Abstract # 2
Effectiveness of Mindfulness in the Education System, to Reduce Stress and Improve Wellbeing
Presenter: Sheena Brown
Abstract:
A curriculum was designed that combined contemplative practices, neuroscience research and student reflection to explore the concept of authentic happiness.  Our overarching questions were: what is authentic happiness, how may we experience it, and what are the obstacles in our way?  Our hypothesis was that through the introduction of mindfulness, students would learn simple, yet tangible ways to manage their emotions, resolve conflicts, make responsible decisions, manage stress, and ultimately enhance their resilience. By bringing together science, art and contemplative practices through experiential learning, students would gain insight of the importance of mind-body integration in the pursuit of wellbeing, and be provided with the skills and resources to incorporate mindfulness into their lives, should they so choose. Variations of the curriculum were presented to college freshmen, and grade school students. The curriculum aimed to provide social support, through creating a sense of community and trust between participants. Qualitative and quantitative analyses revealed self-reported benefits in: individual health and wellness, benefits in mindfulness practices both in-class and out-of-class, with 44% of students reporting more confidence in handling personal problems, and 44% of students experiencing colds or flu less often than in the previous semester.

Abstract # 4
Using Outdoor Experiential Education to Develop Resiliency in Gifted Students
Presenter: Chris Byron Co - Presenters: Chris Hooper
Abstract:
Intensity is inherent in gifted individuals. It’s often a byproduct of asynchronous development and can hamper both academic achievement, growth and social interactions. By fostering resilience through the experiential education model, students develop hardiness by embracing hardships and reflection.

Abstract # 14
Resilience Begins With Beliefs: Building on Student Strengths for Success in School
Presenter: Sara Truebridge
Abstract:
Resilience research focuses on healthy development and successful learning, especially with young people facing difficult life challenges in their homes, schools, and communities. In schools, teachers’ beliefs and perceptions about student resilience influence classroom practices and student success.  This presentation examines the extent to which an increased understanding of student resilience shapes pedagogical beliefs and practices of educators. An important goal of research in resilience is to transfer such research into practice. Thus, this presenttion concludes by addressing the relationship between resilience research and belief research and the implications of findings for education pre-service programs, professional development programs and everyday practice.






Presenters
avatar for Chris Byron

Chris Byron

Teacher, Westmount Charter School
From working with adults in the NWT to special populations on whitewater canoe trips, I have been guiding in natural settings for almost four decades. Once getting my teaching certificate, with an experiential education focus, I began to integrate my guiding experiences into the classroom. About a decade ago I create a grade 7 program called Project Earth. In it, I integrated outdoor experiential education with core curriculum. The program has... Read More →
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Kingsley Hurlington

York Region District School Board
Kingsley Hurlington is a doctoral candidate at Trent University. He has authored textbooks related to Canadian Geography. His doctoral work focuses on resilience and communities, with a special focus on rural contexts. For this work, he draws upon his varied experiences working with youth through many years in education from elementary to university and his private mentorship support program.
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Sarah Truebridge

Sara Truebridge, Ed.D. is an Education Consultant with experience in research, policy, and practice. Her book, Resilience Begins with Beliefs: Building on Student Strengths for Success in School, published by Teachers College Press (2014), was endorsed by Michael Rutter and Suniya Luthar. In 2014 she was invited to present a TED Talk. In 2011 she received an AERA “Excellence in Research to Practice Award.” In 2006-2010 Truebridge... Read More →
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Sheena Brown

Sheena graduated with a PhD in Zoology in 2000, and a Masters in Public Health in 2014. Sheena has worked as assistant lecturer in Zoology, Neuroscience, and Public Health. From 2003 until 2013, Sheena worked as Staff Scientist in the Neuroscience Department at the UA, and currently teaches in the College of Public Health, introducing the course Health and Wellbeing Through the Life Course. Her interests are focused on the emotional wellbeing... Read More →
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Ulrike Graf

Ulrike Graf, PhD, is a Full Professor of Education at Primary School Age (University of Osnabrück/Germany) and Head of the Research Center in Primary School Education at the Institute for Early Childhood Education and Development of Lower Saxony.She works on pedagogy diagnosis, emphasizing ressource-orientation, sensitivity of relationship and is implementing the concept of happiness as part of the curriculum of teacher training in order... Read More →
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Zahide Alaca

Zahide is completing her Master’s in Social Work at Carleton University, with a concentration in social administration and policy. She is interested in understanding the disparities in educational outcomes among children and youth. In her doctoral studies, Zahide plans to examine how some schools in challenging circumstances manage to help their students overcome barriers to academic success.

Co-Presenters
UB

Ulrike Becker

MA at University of Bremen | Ulrike Becker is a teacher of German / English at grammar and secondary schools in Bremen, lecturer in various pedagogical seminars at the University of Bremen, grad. Gestaltpädagogin (“Gestalt pedagogy”) and supervisor in teacher training at LIS (Landesinstitut für Schule) in Bremen.She works on training students at university becoming teachers and accompanies them in periods of practical... Read More →
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Eileen Dahl

Psychotherapist / Consultant / Speaker, Self Employed
Eileen Dahl is a Registered Psychotherapist. She is Certified in Thanatology - death, dying and bereavement (CT) and is a certified spiritual care professional / hospital chaplain with the Canadian Association for Spiritual Care. She has experience working in oncology and palliative care, trauma, mental health and cardiac intensive care units. Eileen is a public speaker and workshop facilitator. Her areas of focus include illness, grief, loss... Read More →
avatar for Angie Hart

Angie Hart

Angie Hart is Professor of Child, Family and Community Health at the University of Brighton and has been working on resilience research and practice for 10 years. She is an advisor to England’s Big Lottery Fund, Angie runs boingboing, a not for profit undertaking resilience research and practice development. http://www.boingboing.org.uk/index.php/who-are-we/angie-hart. She is the Academic Director of the University of Brighton’s Community... Read More →
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Chris Hooper

Adminstrator at Westmount Charter School | Chris Hooper is a administrator at Westmount Charter School in Calgary, Ab. He has a decade of experience in gifted education. He received a masters in kinesiology at the University of Calgary and is currently working on a doctorate of resilience science.
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Ruth Marinelli

Teacher at York Region District School Board | Ruth Marinelli is a secondary school teacher with the York Region District School Board where she works with academically and socially vulnerable students. She is a Masters of Education candidate at OISE.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Boardroom A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

11:00am

Resilience in Cultural Context - Linda Theron
Abstract #58
Culture, Context, and Resilience: Complexities and Caveats
Presenter: Linda Theron Co - Presenters: Robbie Gilligan, Kelly Dean Schwartz, Angelique van Rensburg, Tammlyn Jefferis
Abstract:
In this discussion, facilitated by Prof. Linda Theron, we draw on the findings of three independent projects, that all included African children (9 - 19 years), to challenge unsophisticated and idealistic understandings of how culture and context matter for resilience. To this end, Prof. Robbie Gilligan will highlight what the qualitative findings of the Bamboo Project teach about the resilience processes of Ethiopian children who have been sexually abused/exploited. Dr. Kelly Dean Schwarz will report on a quantitative PYD study that offers insight into the developmental assets of youth living in a rural South African township. Informed by a SEM analysis of the quantitative data of the Pathways to Resilience Project, South Africa, Angelique van Rensburg will foreground the differential resilience processes of two comparable groups of youth from the same traditionally-African social ecology. Using visual participatory data from the same project, Tamlynn Jefferis will show how socio-cultural context enables, but also constrains, the resilience processes of black girls challenged by poverty, violence, and sexual abuse.

Presenters
avatar for Linda Theron

Linda Theron

Linda Theron, D.Ed. (Educational Psychology), is professor in the Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, South Africa. Her research explores why, and how, some South African youth adjust well to poverty, orphanhood, and/or learning difficulties, and how sociocultural contexts shape these processes of resilience (see www.Lindatheron.org / www.optentia.co.za). She publishes and presents internationally on related themes. In 2013, she... Read More →

Co-Presenters
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Robbie Gilligan

Prof at Trinity College | Robbie Gilligan. Robbie is Professor of Social Work and Social Policy, at Trinity College Dublin where he is also Associate Director (and co-founder) of the Children's Research Centre. He is also an (honorary) Research Fellow at SFI – The Danish National
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Tamlynn Jefferis

Tamlynn Jefferis, MA (Research Psychology), is a registered counsellor with the Health Professions Council of South Africa. She is a doctoral candidate in the Optentia Research Focus Area, Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus
avatar for Angelique van Rensburg

Angelique van Rensburg

Post-doctoral Research Fellow, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus, Optentia Research Focus Area
Angelique van Rensburg, PhD (Educational Psychology), is a registered psychological counsellor (independent practice) with the Health Professions Council of South Africa, a member of the Psychological Society of South Africa (PSYSSA) and a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at Optentia Focus Area, North-West University, Vaal Triangle Campus (see www.optentia.co.za). She has collaborated in the Pathways to Resilience Research Project since its... Read More →
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Kelly Schwartz

University of Calgary
Dr at University of Calgary | Dr. Kelly Dean Schwartz is Associate Professor in the School and Applied Child Psychology program and Director, U of C Applied Psychological and Educational Services (UCAPES), an on-campus clinic serving children and families Calgary and area. He has a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and an MSc in Educational Psychology from the University of Calgary. His research and teaching interests include the psychosocial factors... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

11:00am

Resilience: An International Perspective - Kathryn Robertson, Karen Elliott, Charles Mphande, Alex Pessoa, Serena Isaacs, Steve Reid
Resilience: An International Perspective

Abstract #11
Using resilience concepts to improve client outcomes in East Timor
Presenter: Kathryn Robertson
Abstract:
Timor-Leste is a resource poor country which endured more than 20 years of human rights abuses under Occupation by Indonesia. Post-Independence, there has been considerable work done to raise attention about trauma and violence against women and to develop laws, policies and services to respond to violence. While there has been progress, there are many challenges to make these systems really work for women and children who experience abuse. A four year program supported by the Australian Government is now trying to strengthen services through a greater focus on outcomes for clients. In this environment where there is limited access to services for a largely rural population and service providers are learning on the job without much professional training, we are looking at how to use approaches which are informed by resilience and well-being concepts. This may will include using resilience as a guide in assessment, provision of services and monitoring of outcomes. We are interested to look at approaches in other places (for example with First Nations communities) which could be contextualized to the customary and collective nature of culture and everyday life. This experience will be presented through Facilitated Discussion and Brief Presentation.

Abstract #31
Cultivating Resilience in Organizations and Communities: A Collaborative Process and Planning Tool for Intercultural Leaders
Presenter: Karen Elliot
Abstract:
This facilitated discussion provides an introduction to a practical, evidence-based, collaborative leadership process and tool that intercultural leaders can use to guide discussions in communities and organizations. (See visual for process - end of abstract)   The process itself incorporates principles of community building for health (systems thinking), community engagement, and collaborative leadership. The visual for the process is a table framework that facilitates introduction of concepts as follows:  elements of culture and individual resilience (people, place), resilience science (adapt to education needs of audience at-hand), contributors to community and organizational resilience, equity and inclusion, systems thinking, stress, change adversity. The tool is useful for guiding discussions about resilience policy/advocacy/education. It is vital to use a process which is relevant to the leaders at-hand, adaptable in diverse settings, and which incorporates concepts of individual, community, and organizational resilience (and emphasizes their interconnectedness) in the process itself. The equity/inclusion portion of the visual creates an opportunity to discuss the social determinants of health, health equity, mental health, interventions, literacy, social competence and connectedness.

Abstract #53
Linking or Delinking: Resilience and Social Capital in an Unfriendly Environment for Emerging African Communities in Australia
Presenter: Charles Mphande
Abstract:
This paper investigates how informal networks enable the bonding function of social capital within emerging Sudanese and Horn of African communities in the context of Australian society’s continuing environment of racism and misunderstanding towards African-Australians. . Framed by social ecology (Bottrell and Armstrong 2012), and critical discourse theories (Phillips and Jorgensen 2002) we examine multi-layering of informal networks as a means of maximisation of in-group resources against the hostile backdrop of the Howard Government’s focus on the perceived integrative deficits of Sudanese (African) humanitarian immigrants. Given the unwelcome environment the Howard Government created for these recent immigrants (Dhanji 2009), the paper adopts the view that community resilience by in-group bonding, as opposed to linking with wider Australian society, was a selective, strategic and practical means of survival that bypassed formal community, government and non-governmental organisations as largely irrelevant. We focus especially on examining government’s interpretations of such phenomena as failure to integrate, a position that led to limiting African humanitarian immigration. The paper further discusses the vibrancy and effectiveness of informal networks and argues for the promise they offer for addressing needs and challenges of emerging communities.

Abstract #16
Research and Intervention on Resilience Applied to Latin American Context
Presenter: Alex Pessoa
Abstract:
The research and theoretical frameworks on resilience are mostly coming from the Northern Hemisphere. My proposal is to argue that these studies ignore the particularities of Latin American countries and neglect model of social inequality as the main element for the exposition of young adolescent to indicators of psychosocial risk. I advocate the establishment of collaborative networks in order to create interventional practices and research methodologies that highlight these aspects. In this sense, I believe it is relevant to build a theoretical model to challenge hegemonic notions of resilience that has no applicability in Latin America and do not collaborate in disruption of oppressive social structures historically built under a model which prevails inequality and disenfranchisement of some segments. The universities and researchers interested on resilience theory must join forces to design a consistent epistemological frameworks for the groups belonging to this reality. Furthermore, I understand that the policies and interventional programs should target practices that allow emancipation and the breaking of cycles that perpetuate vulnerability across generations. The audience contributions may allow the beginning of the articulation around this reflective process and may bring implications for the field.

Abstract #47
Understanding Family Resilience in a Rural Community in the Western Cape: A Needs Assessment Pilot Study
Presenter: Serena Issacs
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a pilot study in which the aim was to identify the family resilience needs of community members in the rural community in the Western Cape, South Africa.  The questionnaire utilised was the Family Resilience Assessment Scale by Sixbey (2005); an English-language questionnaire which assesses the resilience needs of a family unit.  Since the scale was developed in English, the scale was adapted in the language spoken by 96% of the community (Statistics South Africa, 2012): Afrikaans.  Pilot testing was essential in establishing psychometric properties and identifying any inconsistencies or ambiguity during the adaptation process.  Trained fieldworkers then commenced door-to-door data collection and reached 82 participants.  Preliminary analysis shows that some items were misinterpreted based on translation and need to be further adapted for the main data collection in the next year.  Fieldworker feedback also highlighted the cathartic effect of completing such a questionnaire; the local NGO has since increased the number of people registered for their family discussion group.  This pilot study is forms part of a larger study which has the ultimate goal of developing a community-based programme for strengthening family resilience using a participatory action approach.

Abstract #55
Resilience in South African Health Professionals Undergoing Compulsory Service
Presenter: Steve Reid
Abstract:
This paper investigates how informal networks enable the bonding function of social capital within emerging Sudanese and Horn of African communities in the context of Australian society’s continuing environment of racism and misunderstanding towards African-Australians. . Framed by social ecology (Bottrell and Armstrong 2012), and critical discourse theories (Phillips and Jorgensen 2002) we examine multi-layering of informal networks as a means of maximisation of in-group resources against the hostile backdrop of the Howard Government’s focus on the perceived integrative deficits of Sudanese (African) humanitarian immigrants. Given the unwelcome environment the Howard Government created for these recent immigrants (Dhanji 2009), the paper adopts the view that community resilience by in-group bonding, as opposed to linking with wider Australian society, was a selective, strategic and practical means of survival that bypassed formal community, government and non-governmental organisations as largely irrelevant. We focus especially on examining government’s interpretations of such phenomena as failure to integrate, a position that led to limiting African humanitarian immigration. The paper further discusses the vibrancy and effectiveness of informal networks and argues for the promise they offer for addressing needs and challenges of emerging communities.

Presenters
avatar for Alex Pessoa

Alex Pessoa

PhD Candidate, UNESP
PhD candidate linked to Faculty of Science and Tecnology, University from Sao Paulo (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil. In the last years the researcher developed studies and interventions in the field of childhood and youth' protection. His papers and book chapters are related to sexual violence against children and adolescents, educative pratices and resilience processess in communities and groups exposed to social vulneralibiliies. In the second... Read More →
CM

Charles Mphande

Charles Mphande is a Senior Lecturer in the College of Arts and a member of the Mobilities, Transitions and Resilience Network of the Centre for Cultural Diversity and Wellbeing at Victoria University, Melbourne. His empirical research has focused on resilience as individual or group practices that are both strategic and practical in nature, particularly among emerging African communities in Melbourne. Charles’ other research interests are in... Read More →
KE

Karen Elliott

Cross-sector leadership development professional. Seventeen years as a public health professional. Specialized in collaborative leadership, coalition building (immunizations,vaccine safety, nutrition), health systems, health disparities, equity and inclusion, intercultural communication, policy at organizational, local and state government levels in Oregon. Two years as law clerk, bill digester, staff attorney - state legislature; law clerk for... Read More →
KR

Kathryn Robertson

Kathryn Robertson is a Canadian trained social worker and has had experience in service provision for women, children and other vulnerable groups, in Canada and Asia. In Timor-Leste she helped to establish the first counseling and medical support service for family violence and sexual assault and coordinated the first study on the prevalence of VAW in Timor-Leste. Now she is leading the Services component of a 4 year $20 million program... Read More →
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Serena Isaacs

Miss Serena Isaacs is a Research Psychologist registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa and is a lecturer at the University of the Western Cape. She has published in the field of children and adolescent wellbeing, community violence and substance abuse. She is currently registered for her PhD in Psychology which seeks to develop a family resilience strengthening programme for a rural community in the Western Cape.
SR

Steve Reid

Steve Reid is a family physician with a background in rural health and a doctorate in education, currently director of Primary Health Care at the University of Cape Town. He is involved in medical education and human resources for health, and is particularly interested in the development of young health professionals in the South African public health system. His focus on resilience arises from an understanding of lifecourse theory and its... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

11:00am

School Programs - Alicia Barrett, Maureen Thompson, Darlene Klyne, Jo Robins, Michelle Koay, Ella Simmons
School Programs:

Abstract #43
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability. Case Study 1 in Dropout Prevention: North Winnipeg
Presenter: Darlene Klyne Co - Presenter: Konrad Glogowski
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #59
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability: A Survey of What Works
Presenter: Maureen Thompson
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #64
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability: Case Study 2 in Dropout Prevention: Spryfield, Nova Scotia
Presenter: Alicia Barrett Co-Presenter: Derek Smith, Konrad Glogowski
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #12
Think Good Feel Good - A Whole School Approach
Presenter: Jo Robins
Abstract:
Think Good, Feel Good is a school based programme within primary and secondary schools in Shropshire. The core aim is to develop a whole school approach to supporting and developing resilience through six core components. Those are; by increasing awareness of mental health/resilience/health ill health, by developing a common language for children to express thoughts and feelings, by supporting schools to set up projects in schools that build confidence and self-esteem, by delivering an evidence based training programme, by access to high quality resources, by strengthening links to local mental health services. The programme is supported by a steering group, a small team and through a wider network of practitioners with interests, or expertise in mental or children's wellbeing. The success is borne out in the children who participate in the interventions, in the school staff and in the schools who have embedded the programme in their everyday practice. Feedback from children, staff, local clinicians and Ofsted has been very positive. Quotes from children include "It's really helped to know others worry like I do", when I feel angry or sad I know what I can do to make me feel happy". Teachers say "It's great to be able to help the children with coping strategies in school".

Abstract #24
Working With Students To Improve Resilience Within The School
Presenter: Michelle Koay
Abstract:
In Singapore, the schools recognise that the importance of the social-emotional well-being of students in order to facilitate their development and learning. In most local schools, the school counsellors are responsible for reaching out to the students through prevention and education talks and workshops related to building resilience and improving their mental well-being, with the support of the teachers in the classroom setting. The teachers are trained to provide psychological first-aid for students who require support and to refer more serious cases to the school counsellors for further assessment and treatment.
However, in Secondary Schools, another potential resource to be tapped on is working with the students. This paper will explore how the potential and strengths of adolescents can be harnessed to improve the mental well-being of the students. The paper will elaborate on how the school leverages on peer groups to reach out to their peers who need emotional help and/or support. The paper will also show the school’s efforts to inspire the creative energies of the youth to raise awareness about mental health issues among their peers. The paper will share examples of how students use social media and other school-wide initiatives and activities to influence their peers.

Abstract #35
Show and Tell: Explicitly Teaching the Skills of Resilience in the Classroom
Presenter: Ella Simmons
Abstract:
Every day, children are faced with classroom and playground challenges that require social skills, emotional regulation and problem-solving. There is an assumption that students present to school with the foundation skills for resilience, and will develop these skills further through incidental teaching and participation in the school environment. Some students however will require a more explicit approach to learn the skills needed to establish positive relationships and manage challenging situations. Explicit instruction has been firmly established as an effective method of improving literacy and numeracy outcomes for our students which poses the question: Can we approach social and emotional learning in the same way? As a teacher, I am advocating for personal and social skills to be recognised as more than a 'general capability' within the Australian curriculum. There is a need for schools to adopt comprehensive programmes that focus on the explicit instruction of social and emotional skills combined with opportunities to practice in a supportive and structured environment. By approaching the development of these skills in a formal and coordinated way, we will ensure that all children leave primary school equipped with the skills for lifelong resiliency.…

Presenters
AB

Alicia Barrett

Student Parent Support Worker, Chebucto Connections (Pathways to Education)
I have worked for Chebucto Connections since 2013 as a Student Parent Support Worker with Pathways to Education in Spryfield, Nova Scotia. I grew up in Halifax and completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology at Dalhousie University and Bachelor of Secondary Education at Mount Saint Vincent University. My job allows me to develop personal relationships with youth and their families, and I love having the opportunity to support and work with them as... Read More →
DK

Darlene Klyne

Director, Pathways Winnipeg at Community Education Development Association | Darlene Klyne is a Cree and Lakota mother, wife and grandmother. Darlene is passionate about two things-the value of education and the wellness of the Aboriginal community. At the age of 44 she pursued her lifelong goals of grade 12 graduation and post-secondary studies. Her focus for her educational journey was the Aboriginal community and the power of education as... Read More →
avatar for Ella Simmons

Ella Simmons

Teacher, Dunsborough Primary School
Ella Simmons is a 25 year old primary school teacher from Dunsborough, Western Australia. She graduated from Curtin University in 2011 with the prestigious Miles Medal Award for Excellence in Education for receiving the highest overall mark in her undergraduate degree. Ella has a strong interest in student mental health and well-being and a passion for social progress. She has initiated positive change in her school including the introduction... Read More →
avatar for Jo Robins

Jo Robins

Consultant in Public Health, Shropshire Council
Jo is a public health consultant with many years experience of working in the NHS and in local government leading and developing health improvement programmes for children and adults. During her career she has applied community development skills at strategic, operational and community level beliving in the power of local stakeholders to make changes. She has a passion for emotional health and wellbeing of children and young people and believes... Read More →
MT

Maureen Thompson

Maureen Thompson has been working in leadership positions in the health promotion and community health sectors for over 20 years.  She started her career in drug prevention, international development and human rights, community development and health promotion.  She held the position of Director of Community Health at Regent Park Community Health Centre leading the health promotion, community programs, nutrition, social work and... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Koay

Michelle Koay

School Counsellor, Raffles Girls' School
Michelle Koay was trained as a lay counsellor when she was an engineering officer in the Republic of Singapore Air Force. After obtaining her Master of Social Science (Counselling), she embarked on her journey as a counsellor in the Singapore Armed Forces Counselling Centre, helping military personnel improve their psychological and emotional well-being within the military as well as in their family and social life. Michelle is now a school... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Konrad Glogowski

Konrad Glogowski

Director, Research and Knowledge Mobilization, Pathways to Education Canada
As Director of Research and Knowledge Mobilization at Pathways to Education Canada, Konrad Glogowski is responsible for developing and implementing a long-term national research agenda and strategy for the organization, and providing internal research support to better understand educational attainment and youth well-being programs and approaches in Canada and abroad.
avatar for Derek Smith

Derek Smith

Student Parent Support Worker, Chebucto Connections, Pathways to Education Spryfield
Derek has worked at Chebucto Connections as a Student Parent Support Worker for the Pathways to Education program since September 2013. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Saint Mary's University and a Bachelor of Education degree from Mount Saint Vincent University. During his education degree Derek began volunteering with the Pathways Program. He left Halifax to teach math in England for 2 years before returning to Canada to... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

11:00am

Children in Care - Lise Milne, Tessa Bell , Lindsay Hill
Children in Care:

Abstract #128
A Trauma-Informed Analysis of the Trajectories and Resilience Capacities of Youth in Child Protective Services Group Care
Presenter:Lise Milne Co - Presenters: Delphine Collin-Vézina, Christine Wekerle
Abstract:
This presentation describes findings on a population of youth in out-of-home group care (OHGC) who participated in the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) study, the first Canadian longitudinal study of youth involved with Child Protective Services. Trauma-informed assessments of youth in OHGC is an especially growing concern in light of their well-documented trauma exposures, multiple victimizations, behavior problems and acute mental health symptoms. Youth also experience additional chronic stressors including separation from families, peers, and communities, multiple moves, impermanence, and uncertainty. Three related areas will be examined: (1) The profiles of youth at baseline regarding their traumatic experiences, trauma-related symptoms, age, gender, and length of time in care; (2) Their trajectories six months later, with regard to how their mental health profiles evolved over time; and (3) Their trajectories 18 months later, with regard to their resilience capacities in relation to previous and current mental health. The aim is to better understand the trauma profiles and trajectories of this vulnerable, yet understudied population. In addition, it aims to identify the conditions that support the healthy development of youth who lack individual, family, community, and socio-political resources to sustain health and well-being in the face of multiple adversities.

Abstract #156
Child Resilience in Out-of-Home Care: Child Welfare Worker Perspectives 
Presenter: Tessa Bell Co - Presenters: Elisa Romano 
Abstract:
The study of resilience and its associated factors is highly applicable to child welfare as children living in out-of-home care have often experienced adversity and are vulnerable to the development of difficulties across various domains. The use of qualitative research in the study of resilience is scarce, with the majority of such studies based on the U.K. or U.S. child welfare systems. Therefore, the goal of this study was to gain child welfare workers’ perspectives on resilience and to explore factors that they believe influence resilience. Eleven child welfare workers from Ontario (Canada) participated in a semi-structured interview, which was developed using an ecological perspective and as such, inquired about sources of resilience from within children themselves, their family, their community, and the child welfare worker and agency. A number of factors associated with resilience (e.g., child intelligence) were identified; however, the critical importance of a child’s relationships underpinned all factors discussed. In addition, the dynamic interrelationships between levels of the ecological model and how these can impact a child’s resilience were highlighted. The findings highlight the importance of including the perspectives of all those involved in the child welfare system in assessing the well-being of children in out-of-home care.

Abstract #186
Implementing the Resilience Framework in Kinship Care Practice
Presenter: Lindsay Hill 
Abstract:
The Resilience Framework (RF) was developed by Hart, Blincow and Thomas (2007). It emphasises the co-production of knowledge and methods of working which are sensitive to the dynamic, political and relational nature of care. In the UK formal kinship care is a term that is used to refer to statutory arrangements in which children who have experienced abuse are looked after by extended family members. Research has identified that carers are living in situations of disadvantage and that their support needs are unmet. Kinship carers and the children they were caring for were engaged in collaborative action research. A research group comprised of seven kinship carers met for a period of twelve months, they learnt about the RF approach and explored ways of applying it in their care of children. Photo- voice was a method used to enable carers to reflect on their caring practices. Carers acquired a language through which to talk about doing kinship care. It increased their sensitivity to children and highlighted for them their own needs as carers. The impact of the subtle processes of power and disadvantage were revealed in the pictures they brought to the group. Drawing on an ethic of care the paper will also focus on how practitioners can seek to maintain responsiveness to what RF informed interventions are designed to achieve and the impact they have for children.

Presenters
LH

Lindsay Hill

Lindsay’s professional background is in social work and she currently works as a senior lecturer at Brighton University where she teaches on qualifying social work programmes. Her theoretical interests are in feminism, ethics and resilience. She is interested in user involvement in research and in collaborative approaches to the production of knowledge which can be used to inform practice developments in social work with children and... Read More →
LM

Lise Milne

Lise Milne is a fourth-year Ph.D. student at McGill University. She has worked for six years at the McGill Centre for Research on Children and Families on several child welfare research projects and has been a course lecturer for undergraduate and graduate social work courses. Lise completed her Masters Degree at McGill University and Criminology and Social Work degrees at the University of Manitoba. Lise has 13 years of experience in child... Read More →
TB

Tessa Bell

Tessa Bell is a postdoctoral fellow, funded by the Ontario Mental Health Foundation, at the University of Ottawa. Her postdoctoral research relates to the topic of resilience and risk among children and youth in out-of-home care. Specifically, she is interested in what risk and protective factors contribute to resilience, working from an ecological perspective. She is also interested in learning how child welfare workers, foster parents, and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DC

Delphine Collin-Vezina

Dr. at McGill University | Dr. Delphine Collin-Vézina is the Tier II Canadian Child Welfare Research Chair, an Associate Professor in Social Work at McGill University, and the director of the McGill Centre for Research on Children and Families. She is a clinical and developmental psychologist with a strong interest in child welfare and child maltreatment. She completed a postdoctoral degree on the short- and long-term consequences of... Read More →
ER

Elisa Romano

Associate Professor at University of Ottawa | Elisa Romano is an Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, Canada). She is also a registered clinical psychologist in the province of Ontario. 
avatar for Christine Wekerle

Christine Wekerle

Dr at McMaster University | Christine Wekerle, is associate professor at Department of Pediatrics – Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University. She is the lead investigator in the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) funded Boys’ and Men’s Health Team grant. Her epidemiological and clinical research covers the key construct areas of: self-harm, mental health, violence, substance abuse, and Aboriginal/First... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

11:00am

Culture as Resilience in Indigenous Communities - David Mykota, Andrew Hatala, Carol Kauppi
Culture as Resilience in Indigenous Communities:

Abstract #86
Honouring Our Strengths: Indigenous Culture as Intervention in Addictions Treatment
Presenter: David Mykota 
Abstract:
Drug addiction among Indigenous peoples is a serious health concern in Canada. Indigenous knowledge shares that traditional culture is vital for client healing. However, there is an absence of empirical documentation regarding the impact of traditional cultural practices on client wellness. Our project is the first of its kind in Canada’s addictions field and is suitably timed with renewal processes underway in Canada’s First Nations treatment system for the establishment of a culturally competent evidence base to document the nature and the effectiveness of engaging cultural interventions within treatment programs. The aim of our community-based research team’s work is to evaluate the effectiveness of First Nations culture as a health intervention in alcohol and drug treatment. We involved: 1) Treatment Centre environmental scan participants (staff, clients and community members, 2) Indigenous knowledge keepers (Elders and other traditional knowledge keepers), 3) Western-trained research team members. Our work has resulted in the establishment of a wellness framework addressing physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual well-being. From this, a valid instrument to measure the impact of cultural interventions on client wellness was drafted and is currently being field-tested. We look forward to sharing this information broadly through innovative, informative and engaging knowledge translation products.

Abstract #183
Mental Illness, Resilience, And A Concept Of The "Future": Identifying Strategies Of Resilience And Mental Health Among Inner-City First Nations And Métis Youth
Presenter: Andrew Hatala
Abstract:
Mental illnesses enact a significant toll on Canadian youth, yet are unevenly distributed throughout the country. Estimates suggest that 15% of young Canadians between the ages of 10 and 19 cope with anxiety, depression, or addictions, while estimates among Aboriginal populations are twice the national average (35%), with addictions and suicide being five times national averages. These inequities signal a crucial need for research among Aboriginal youth. This study employed a mixed-methods approach within the inner-city contexts of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM-28) was administered to approximately 100 First Nations and Metis youth to identify sources of stress, risk, and resilience. In-depth qualitative stories and a photovoice project further occurred with 12 youth to phenomenologically elucidate successful coping strategies. The results of this research identified several strategies for successful coping, like cultural continuity and spirituality, but also highlight the importance of youth having a concept for and conception of the “future.” Those youth who could conceptualize and imaginatively project into the “future” were seen to be the most resilient. This research can inform early intervention theory and policy to promote the mental health of Aboriginal children and youth in Saskatoon and other Canadian urban contexts.

Abstract #207
Resilience among Indigenous Youth: A Retrospective, Narrative Study
Presenter: Carol Kauppi Co - Presenters: Arshi Shaikh, Honarine Scott 
Abstract:
This presentation describes a study conducted using a qualitative participatory action research (PAR) design and a narrative approach. This retrospective study explores resilience among Indigenous youth based on the experiences, perspectives and narratives of a Mushkegowuk Cree storyteller reflecting upon his youth. The narrative analysis was guided by a resilience model to identify themes of resilience within an Indigenous context. Issues relating to the political and cultural contexts of the participant’s early life, personal experiences of adversity and elements of resilience will be discussed. Resilience was evident in the relationships developed by the participant. Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous resources available to him in the community enabled him to survive in the face of extreme hardship. The findings underscore the importance of addressing issues that impact on youth resilience at the individual, family and community levels. Through the medium of storytelling, this study begins to address the lack of research about resilience among Indigenous youth. Storytelling, based on the experiences of individuals, is a powerful method of sharing life lessons for the benefit of the next generation. This study contributes to the on-going conversation of how to develop supportive services that foster health and well-being among Indigenous youth.

Presenters
AH

Andrew Hatala

Andrew R. Hatala was a Ph.D. student in the Culture, Health and Human Development program at the University of Saskatchewan. His Ph.D. research involved looking at how Western medical models of mental health treatment and conceptualization compare with Indigenous knowledge and approaches in the treatment and conception of mental disorders. After completing his Ph.D., Andrew began a CIHR post-doctoral research project in the Department of... Read More →
CK

Carol Kauppi

Professor at Laurentian University | Carol Kauppi is the Director of Poverty, Homelessness and Migration, a five-year research project dealing with homelessness and migration in northern Ontario. She is also Professor of Social Work and Director of the Centre for Research in Social Justice and Policy at Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Kauppi’s research interests have focused in recent years mainly on homelessness and... Read More →
DM

David Mykota

University of Saskatchewan
David Mykota is an Associate Professor in the College of Education, Department of Educational Psychology & Special Education, at the University of Saskatchewan. His research areas include substance abuse, program evaluation, resiliency, e-learning, and child and youth psychopathology.

Co-Presenters
HS

Honarine Scott

Clinical Treatment Worker at Native Child and Family Services of Toronto | Honarine Scott, M.S.W, completed her master's degree at Laurentian University. Her employment has focused on child, adolescent and family services for Indigenous people. Her master's thesis explored resilience in adolescence through a narrative study of a Cree storyteller.
AS

Arshi Shaikh

Assistant Professor, Renison University College-University of Waterloo
Arshi Shaikh, Ph.D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Development Studies at Renison University College-University of Waterloo and an Adjunct Professor at Laurentian University, Sudbury. She is a Registered Social Worker in the province of Ontario. Dr. Shaikh’s recent research activities pertain to the areas of family homelessness, international community development, sustainable food systems and their connections with... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Classroom 3 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

11:00am

Early Childhood Resilience - Geraldine Oades-Sese, Betul Alaca, Sheila McDonald
Early Childhood Resilience:

Abstract #130
Building Resilience in Civilian and Military Children the Sesame Street Way
Presenter: Geraldine Oades-Sese Co - Presenter: Noor Mahmood
Abstract:
The purpose of the Sesame Street Resilience Project was to determine the effectiveness of the multimedia educator’s toolkit, Little Children, Big Challenges in promoting resilience in young children ages 3 to 5. Teachers were trained to implement a 12-week resilience-based intervention in their classrooms. The intervention group focused on enhancing children’s social-emotional resilience, while the active control group focused on building physical/mental resilience through healthy eating and exercise. Participants included 159 preschool teachers, 822 parents, and 3,180 civilian and military-connected preschool children from state preschools, Head Start Centers, and Military Child Developmental Centers in San Diego, California.  Sixty school sites were randomly assigned to an active control or intervention group. Within each classroom, five children from each classroom were randomly selected to be evaluated during pre- and post-intervention for a total of 822 children.  Child outcomes were measured using standardized rating scales from teachers and parents as well as direct testing of children’s skills. Findings demonstrated that the intervention increased children’s adaptive skills, decreased depression and anxiety, enhanced children’s relationships with their parents and teachers, and increased children’s social skills, emotional competence, and emotional literacy. The differential effects of the intervention between civilian and military children are discussed.

Abstract #149
Children To Children In Faraway Places: Gaining Insight Into Preschooler’s Views Of Their Communities
Presenter: Betul Alaca Co - Presenters: Claudia Rocca, Stefania Maggi
Abstract:
In this presentation, we will report results from a study that sought to understand how young children perceive their residential communities. Conducted as part of an international initiative (Kids in Places), children’s insights were gathered in the context of a cultural exchange between five Canadian and five Italian preschools. Approximately 100 children between the ages of 3 and 5 were asked to share their views of the social and physical spaces within their community with other children who live in a ‘faraway place’. Towards this aim, children engaged in a series of drawing and photo-taking activities to describe their communities, thereby generating rich qualitative data for this study. Half of the children were audio recorded as they verbally described their drawings and photos – these accounts are being used to guide our data analyses. Preliminary analyses show that preschool children understand the concept of community as extending beyond their home and school environments. Further analyses are currently underway. Results will be presented with specific reference to the socio-economic and social characteristics of the communities that the children described. Implications of the results will be discussed, with an emphasis on children’s views and how they may be related to community resilience.

Abstract #226
Risk And Resilience Factors For Early Child Development: A Community-Based Cohort Study In Alberta, Canada
Presenter: Sheila McDonald 
Abstract:
One in six children experience developmental problems at school entry; however, we lack a comprehensive understanding of risk and protective factors. The objectives of this study were to describe the key risk factors for poor child development at age 12 months and to identify factors that reduce the potentially adverse influence of poor maternal mental health and low socioeconomic status on child development. Methods: Data used is from the All Our Babies study, a prospective pregnancy cohort in Calgary, Alberta. The associations between putative risk factors and poor child development were examined in bivariate and multivariable analyses. A bivariate resilience analysis was also conducted to identify factors related to positive child development in the presence of maternal mental health or sociodemographic risk. Results: Key risk factors for poor child development included poor maternal mental health during pregnancy, low community resource use, and lack of adult interaction in the first postpartum year. Parenting efficacy, uptake of community resources and increased adult interaction were protective of poor child development among children most at risk for this outcome. Conclusions: As many of the identified risk and protective factors are modifiable, these results can inform community based strategies to optimize early childhood development.

Presenters
BA

Betul Alaca

Betul is completing her final year in the Bachelor of Honours Psychology program at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada). She is interested in the ways in which early learning environments and residential communities can promote healthy child development. Betul is currently writing her thesis under the supervision of Dr. Stefania Maggi. Using visual methods, her thesis seeks to understand how young children view and define the spaces and places... Read More →
GO

Geraldine Oades-Sese

Geraldine V. Oades-Sese, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and the Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. She is also the Director of the Research Lab for Resilience and Early Childhood Development. Her research includes Project Resilience, a 3-year longitudinal study, which examines the social-emotional and academic resilience of at-risk Hispanic American preschool... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Stefania Maggi

Stefania Maggi

Associate Professor, Carleton University
Associate Professor, Leading Investigator for the Kids in Places Initiative at Carleton University Stefania is Associate Professor at Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada) with the Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, Child Studies Program, and the Department of Psychology. She is a developmental epidemiologist with an interest in the social determinants of child health, children’s rights, participatory research methods, and... Read More →
NM

Noor Mahmood

Research Assistant at Rutgers University | Noor Mahmood is an undergraduate senior at Rutgers University, pursing a joint degree in biology and psychology, with a minor in nutrition. She is the Lab Manager for the Resilience Lab and is an eboard member for Project HEAL. She has also mentored at-risk high school students in her hometown for the past year. Her research interest is in the role of diet in daily life and health. She enjoys... Read More →
CR

Claudia Rocca

Canadian Project Coordinator for the Kids in Places Initiative at Carleton University | Claudia is the Canadian Project Coordinator for the Kids in Places Initiative. She obtained a Masters degree in Social Psychology from Carleton University, Canada for research on the allocation of limited resources. She served as the research coordinator for the project to improve the fairness of research grant competitions in the Canadian Institute of... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

11:00am

Health - Shannon Ryan-Carson, Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido, Sayma Malik
Health:

Abtract #95
A Novel Community-Based Intervention To Enhance Health Promotion, Risk Factor Management And Chronic Disease Prevention
Presenter: Shannon Ryan-Carson
Abstract:
Chronic disease is a highly expensive but preventable problem to the healthcare system. Evidence suggests that impacting modifiable behaviours and risk management factors in the areas of physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, stress, and obesity can alleviate the burden of chronic disease problem to a large extent. Despite this recognition, the challenge is embedding these recognized priorities into the community and in primary care in a sustainable and meaningful manner. Primary Health Care (PHC) in Capital Health responded to this challenge by developing and implementing a free, interprofessional and community-based service, namely, the Community Health Teams that offers health and wellness, risk factor management, wellness navigation and behaviour-based programming.  In this presentation, the development and implementation of the CHTs will be discussed. Preliminary outcomes for the model are significant and promising.

Abstract #184
Differences In The Use Of Coping Strategies In High- And Low-Resilience Individuals From Four different Health-Related Conditions
Presenter: Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido Co - Presenters: Rocío Rodríguez-Rey, Jesús Alonso-Tapia, Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz, Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno
Abstract:
Shown resilience vary in degree across situations, and although coping strategies have been conceptualised as ‘styles’, different situations trigger different degrees of coping strategies use. 
The aim of the study was relating use of coping strategies to resilience outcomes in different problem situations. Individuals who were HIV+ (N=60), had cancer (N=22), had children with cancer (N=62) or were healthy (N=249; total N=393) completed the subjective contextual resilience scale (SCRS) –which considers five problem areas– and a contextual coping scale (CCS) that comprised eight strategies. We obtained a high- and a low-resilience group for each sample and conducted ANOVAs to study what coping strategies differed in degree of use between the high and low resilience groups in each sample.
Results show that HIV+ high- and low-resilience groups differed in their use of all strategies except for problem-solving and thinking-avoidance strategies. Cancer groups differed only in rumination, and parents groups did in rumination, self-blaming, positive-thinking and thinking-avoidance. Lastly, healthy groups differed in rumination, emotional expression, self-blaming and positive-thinking.
In conclusion, some strategies are more important for certain types of problem situations, so different interventions should be implemented depending on the specific problem.

Abstract #221
Are Stress, Distress and Resilience Associated with Renal Complications in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes? Preliminary Results from the iCARE Cohort Study
Presenter: Sayma Malik 
Abstract:
Are stress, distress and resilience associated with renal complications in youth with type 2 diabetes? Preliminary results from the iCARE cohort study.
Malik S, Dart AB, Sellers EA, Wicklow B, Dean H, Walker J, Chateau D, Blydt-Hansen TD, McGavock J
Youth with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are at high risk for renal failure in early adulthood. The iCARE study is evaluating the association between psychological factors and albuminuria (early marker of kidney complications) in a cohort of First Nations youth with T2DM. Methods:Youth with T2DM 10-25 years of age were recruited from the Manitoba Diabetes Education Resource for Children and Adolescents. A case-control study (cases with and controls without albuminuria) was performed to assess the association between perceived stress (PSS-14), distress (K6), and resilience (RSCA) with the presence of albuminuria. Results: 122 youth with T2DM have been recruited to date (40 with albuminuria and 82 without). No differences were seen in BMI z-scores or perceived stress, between cases and controls. Youth with albuminuria displayed higher A1c (worse glycemic control), elevated systolic blood pressure, and more significant psychological distress.  Resiliency (specifically mastery) was the same between groups, however associated with better glycemic control. Conclusions:Psychological distress is independently associated with albuminuria in youth onset T2DM, in addition to poor glycemic control and hypertension. Lower levels of distress and higher levels of mastery are associated with better glycemic control.

Presenters
avatar for Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Ph. D Candidate, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido is a Ph.D candidate at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, who develops her work in the area of resilience in health issues, particularly with People Living with HIV. She is also interested and engaged in research related to associated stigma and lack of social support, both in HIV+ condition and in sexual diversity. She is currently collaborating in Sandoval Health Center in Madrid, specializing in sexually... Read More →
SM

Sayma Malik

Assistant Professor and Clinical Psychologist, University of Manitoba
Sayma Malik is a clinical psychologist and assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Health Psychology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Manitoba. She received her doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology, San Francisco. Sayma specializes in early intervention and prevention by supporting child-parent attachment relationships. This includes assessment and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Jesús Alonso-Tapia

Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Jesús Alonso-Tapia is a full-time Professor in Psychological and Educational Assessment at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Specialized in Motivation, self-regulation, resilience and learning assessment, he received the First National Price of Education in 1997. He is author of many publications in journals such as Learning and Instruction, Journal of Learning and... Read More →
CN

Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno is a Ph.D teacher in the Experimental Psychology Department at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She is interested in the study of basic processes in children with developmental difficulties, especially in children with Autism.
RR

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey is a Health Psychologist and a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Her field of interest is resilience, mental health, and posttraumatic growth in children who suffer from severe illnesses and their families. More specifically, she has conducted most of her research in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. She has worked in oncology... Read More →
MN

Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz is a Ph.D teacher in Multivariate Techniques at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has collaborated in the development and adaptation to Spanish language of several quality of life measures.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Vroom Room A&A Lower Floor, King's College

11:00am

Pathways to Resilience in Adverse Settings - Devin Atallah, Michele Grossman, Mokoena Patronella Maepa
Pathways to Resilience in Adverse Settings:

Abstract #154
Beyond the Siege’s Shadow: Pathways to Intergenerational Resilience in Palestinian Refugee Families
Presenter: Devin Atallah 
Abstract:
The purpose of this presentation is to share the empirical findings of a study that investigated the resilience pathways of Palestinian refugee families living under the Israeli occupation over several generations. The study utilized transdisciplinary community-based approaches to research and qualitative methods when interviewing 5 extended families in a United Nations refugee camp in the West Bank. First, the researcher identified families with living elders who were forcibly removed from their indigenous lands in 1948. Subsequently, 25 semi-structured family and individual interviews were conducted with 3 generations within each of the 5 participating families. Using grounded theory situational analysis, an empirical model of intergenerational family adaptation in response to longstanding multifaceted political violence emerged. This model articulates key protective practices that Palestinian refugee families pass down across generations and theorizes family resilience within three themes: resistance to military siege and structural violence; return to cultural roots despite historical and ongoing displacement; and perseverance through continuous adversities and accumulating traumas. These findings offer helpful indicators of positive adjustment across multiple stages in the lifespan development of Palestinian refugees while contributing to literatures on intergenerational resilience in postcolonial settings with marginalized families exposed to historical trauma and continuous structural violence.

Abstract #180
‘You Need To Show You Care’: Cultural Diversity And Community Resilience Against Violent Extremism
Presenter: Michele Grossman 
Abstract:
This paper considers several key findings from a recent Australian study (Grossman and Tahiri 2014) investigating the role of cultural diversity in the context of resilience to violent extremism. Traditionally, counter-terrorism and emergency management resilience research and policy have focused largely on community risks and vulnerabilities (Grossman, 2014; Weine and Ahmed, 2012). By contrast, our study adopts an asset-based approach (Mohaupt 2009) that looks to both older and newer multi-faith Australian ethnocultural communities to identify elements of cultural identities, values, practices and beliefs that enable them to withstand and reject violence as a solution to social and political grievances and concerns. Based on qualitative data from more than 80 Lebanese-, Indonesian-, Somali- and South/Sudanese-Australian participants, key cross-cutting elements of ‘resilience capital’ both within and across cultures in the context of violent extremism emerged from the data. However, some culturally specific strategies for managing the uptake of violent extremism in communities, including complex dynamics of shame, social belonging and status, suggest that these can simultaneously strengthen and erode cultural and community resilience. The findings also emphasise the close relationship between the general capacity of resilient communities to be strong and well and maintaining resilience against violent extremism in particular.

Abstract #217
Self-Esteem And Resilience Differences Among Street Children Compared To Non-Street Children In Limpopo Province Of South Africa
Presenter: Mokoena Patronella Maepa
Abstract:
Street children phenomenon is an evitable social problem. Using an independent sample group design, this study aimed at exploring the differences in self-esteem and resilience among street children (N= 300) 8-18 years with the mean age of 15.92 (SD= 1.89) were selected using purposive sampling method non-street children (N=300) with ages ranging from 8-18 years with mean age of 15.46 (SD= 1.87). A questionnaire with four sections was used (section A: demographic information, section B: self-esteem scale and section C: resilience scale). An independent t-test was used to test the study hypothesis. The study revealed that street children reported low self-esteem t(598) = 20.03, p< .000 and  poor resilience t(598) = 9.48, p< .000 compared to non-street children. The study therefore concluded that street children and non-street children differ on self-esteem and resilience. Recommendations and implications are discussed.



Presenters
DA

Devin Atallah

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Harvard Medical School
Devin Atallah, PhD, is currently a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with Harvard Medical School, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine. Dr. Atallah completed a doctorate in Clinical Psychology from University of Massachusetts, Boston (UMB), where he focused his dissertation research on intergenerational trauma and resilience in Palestinian refugee families in partnership with community-based, grassroots human rights organizations in... Read More →
MG

Michele Grossman

Dr Michele Grossman is Professor of Cultural Studies and Director of the Centre for Cultural Diversity and Wellbeing at Victoria University, Melbourne. Her research and publications focus on cultural diversity and countering violent extremism; community engagement in policing; and diversifying resilience theory and practice in multicultural societies. Dr Grossman’s projects in these areas are supported by research grants from Australian... Read More →
MP

Mokoena Patronella Maepa

Im am a qualified Clinical Psychologist who used to work at a government institution with a variety of clients.Currently I am a lecturer at North-West University at the Psychoogy department. I am involve in teaching undrgraduate and post-graduate programmes. I also co-cordinate the Clinical Psychology programme.Im a registered doctoral student with the title "Psychosocial challenges of street chidren in Limpopo Province and efficacy for social... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

11:00am

The Kauai Longitudinal Study: A Qualitative Narrative Approach on Resilience in Older Adulthood
The Kauai Longitudinal Study: A Qualitative Narrative Approach on Resilience in Older Adulthood:

Abstract #225
The Kauai Longitudinal Study: A Qualitative Narrative Approach on Resilience in Older Adulthood
Presenter: Laurie McCubbin Co - Presenters: Jason Sievers, Jennifer Moniz, Augusto "Bango" Gancinia, Greg Urquhart
Abstract:
This study, using a narrative life history qualitative approach, involved interviewing 8 original “resilient” participants (4 men, 4 women) from the Kauai Longitudinal study. The purpose of the study was to examine their adaptation, resilience and well-being in older adulthood.  
The most prevalent theme across all participants was ‘ohana (family) including the adversity they faced as children growing up in Kauai along with reflections on their current family situation. Navigating past family trauma appeared manageable but for some participants a continuous negotiation with past issues with parents (e.g. abandonment, physical abuse and alcoholism) was present in their stories.  The second theme in the interviews was coping. Coping was inclusive of family based upon self-reflection of intergenerational parenting practices.  Coping was also seen in two additional subthemes: cultural values and spirituality.   Some participants coped with finding a higher purpose through connections to the ‘aina (land) and mona (ocean) and giving back to future generations.  Spirituality was expressed in multiple ways including finding God and finding purpose in life.   These themes overlap many constructs in the resilience and well-being literature including Ungar’s navigation and negotiation in resilience (2010), Ryff’s work on psychological well-being (1999) and Masten’s concept of ordinary magic (2001).  
Matsen, A.S. (2001).  Ordinary magic.  American Psychologist, 56(3), 227-238.
Ryff, C.D. & Marshall, V.W. (1999). The self and society in aging processes.  New York, NY: Springer.

Presenters
LM

Laurie McCubbin

Dr. Laurie “Lali” McCubbin, Associate Professor in counseling psychology, is an indigenous/multiracial scholar at Washington State University. Her research involves: resilience and well-being among indigenous peoples and people of color, cultural identity development, and stress and coping processes among multiracial families. She is the past Co-Chair of the Center of Mestizo and Indigenous Research and Engagement and served as... Read More →

Co-Presenters
AQ

Augusto "Bango" Gancinia

Graduate Research Assistant at Washington State University | Augusto "Bango" Gancinia is a masters student in community counseling at Washington State University.
JM

Jennifer Moniz

Graduate Research Assistant at Washington State University | Jennifer Moniz, MS, is a doctoral student in counseling psychology at Washington State University. She is currently serving as the Project Coordinator for the Kauai Longitudinal Study. She was formerly a school counselor at a local high school on Kauai prior to starting her Ph.D.
JS

Jason Sievers

Director at Washington State University | Dr. Jason Sievers is the Director of Graduate Studies Education at the Washington State University. His research interests and expertise are in resilience and leadership, student athletes and academic well-being. He also serves as the Assistant Director of Resilience and Well-Being Project.
GU

Greg Urquhart

Washington State University


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

12:30pm

Lunch Break
Take a quick break and prepare for another session of fascinating papers and discussions to come!

What's for lunch?
2 Choices of Pasta
Sauce: Meat Sauce, Chicken Alfredo or Marinara Vegetarian
Fresh Garlic Bread
Caesar Salad 


Wednesday June 17, 2015 12:30pm - 1:45pm
TBA

1:45pm

Concurrent Paper Presentations and Facilitated Discussions
Enjoy papers and facilitated discussions by presenters such as Angela Veale, Rosaline Olumbe, and Lisa Evanoff, on topics like Mothers, Mental Health and Youth Voices, and Spirituality to name a few!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
TBA

1:45pm

Building Resilience In Children and Youth -Rebecca Fairchild, Jennifer First, Carolyn Mak, Madelyn Labella, Myrna McNitt, Gerald Jacobs
Building Resilience In Children And Youth:

Abstract # 19
Strengthening Relationships: Music Therapy Performances With Pre-Adolescent Children And Families Living In Crisis
Presenter: Rebecca Fairchild
Abstract:
Living in crisis due to homelessness and family violence often leads to a lack of positive health resources, broken relationships and feelings of isolation for pre-adolescent children.  Engaging in creative mediums provides an outlet for children to express their emotions, connect with others and developing healthy coping styles (McFerran, 2010). This paper describes a qualitative research project exploring the experience of sharing a music therapy performance for children and their families. Three pre-adolescent children participated in a 14-week music therapy group that culminated in the sharing of a musical performance with their families. Following the performance, interviews were conducted with the participants in the program as well as their parents. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith, Flowers & Larkin, 2009) identified individual and shared themes, and the findings will be discussed. 

Abstract # 20
Enhancing Resilience In Children And Adolescents Using The Resilience And Coping Intervention (RCI)
Presenter: Jennifer First
Abstract:
The Resilience and Coping Intervention (RCI) is a group intervention designed for use with school-aged children and adolescents to help participants identify thoughts, feelings, and coping strategies related to psychological, behavioral, and relationship issues following a traumatic or other problematic experience or event in the context of developmental challenges and the usual stresses of daily life. RCI is a coping exercise that engages a group of children or adolescents in a dialogue about issues that may be difficult to discuss, encouraging them to share their thoughts and feelings about their experiences and to identify appropriate and successful coping strategies. RCI is a strength-based intervention that can be administered in a single session by mental health professionals, teachers, parents, caregivers, or other adults in the community that have been trained in conducting the interview.  Results from a non-controlled before and after study revealed that participating children and youth (N=74) reported increased hope about the future, improved coping skills, and a better overall ability to handle emotions and behaviors.

Abstract # 25
Kids Help Phone's Online And Mobile Tools
Presenter: Carolyn Mak
Abstract:
This Facilitated Discussion will present two of Kids Help Phone’s online and mobile tools that support youth mental health and well-being; our mobile app, Always There, and interactive map-based tool, Resources Around Me. Always There was launched in December, 2012 and has five features including a Feelings Log, Stress Buster, vetted information from our Teens' websites, as well as the ability to reach a professional counsellor at the touch of a button. Launched in January, 2014, Resources Around Me puts the power of Kids Help Phone’s Community Resource Database – which our counsellors use every day to help young people connect to services offering direct support in their communities – in the hands of youth themselves. By offering these tools in English and French to young people, free, and available 24/7, we are empowering them to explore information, services, and resources that work best for them in a medium with which they are most familiar. We believe that this helps them build skills to support themselves when they are faced with challenges and encourages help-seeking.

Abstract # 8
Promoting Resilience By Improving Children's Sleep: A Pilot Intervention For High-Risk Families
Presenter: Madelyn Labella
Abstract:
Authors: Madelyn H. Labella, Andrew J. Barnes, Amanda W. Kalstabakken, Janelle Leppa, Ann S. Masten
Poverty has been linked to sleep disruption, which is in turn associated with behavior problems and poor physical health (Bates et al., 2002; Brouillette et al., 2011). Thus, sleep disturbance may be a key mechanism for effects of poverty on child development. In a collaborative effort to promote resilience by improving sleep, university and community partners developed a novel intervention to boost healthy sleep habits in low-income families, with potential benefits for children’s sleep quality, self-regulation, and family routines. 
Pilot participants are twelve 4-8 year old children and their biological mothers, all residing in transitional housing. Families are predominantly African American, led by single parents who are currently unemployed. Targeted outcomes are family routines, household chaos, and children’s sleep, self-regulation, and behavior, assessed by parent report, sleep actigraphy, and executive function performance. 
At baseline, children’s behavior problems were associated with exposure to stress (recent and lifetime), household chaos was inversely related to family routines, and sleep problems were negatively associated with income. Sleep data acquired throughout the intervention, results from follow-up testing, and parent feedback will be presented. Preliminary evidence of feasibility and acceptability, along with implications for community collaboration, will be discussed.  

Abstract # 52
Children In Foster Care: A Positive Experience Or A Threat To Resilience?
Presenter: Myrna McNitt Co - Presenters: Kathleen Kufeldt
Abstract:
Children receive protection through interventions delivered by formal systems of care including use of foster care.  Children have the right to be linked to their family and community, and receive developmentally appropriate interventions to assure for their protection and well-being.  In child protection the rights of the child are best carried out when services are child centered, family focused, and community based.  All too often child protection services are loosely organized and constructed; and are reactive rather than proactively planned.  Poor outcomes in foster care been well documented in areas of education, employability, substance misuse and early parenting.  Lyons and Rogers (2004) indicate that half of children in the system have clinically significant emotional or behavioral problems…this high level of mental health problems makes the child welfare system a behavioral health care system. There is a failure in child welfare to use evidence based practices drawing from services which are clinically based and scientifically researched. (p.134)  All of this undermines the resiliency of the foster child. To reduce risks and promote resiliency, services must be holistic and address the child’s normative development in all areas.  Assessment and Action Records are evidenced based and promote healthy child development and resiliency.

Abstract #335
Youth Transitioning from Care:  A Youth Development Approach strengthening Resilience
Presenter: Gerald Jacobs 
Abstract:
Mamelani Projects is a Non-Profit in Cape Town, South Africa.  Mamelani’s Youth Development Programme works with young people transitioning from residential Child and Youth Care Centers. We have developed an approach that capacitates young people to deal with realities post-care. Research has shown that without adequate support, this target group faces poor outcomes in adult life. We are working with young people, and nurturing the environments into which they return to strengthen practices and service provision towards pathway planning for smoother transitions. We have drawn lessons from International research (local research in this area is still very limited), and have been encouraged to see the approach is well suited to address the contextual issues in the sector and also aligned with International best practice We would like to share our experiences of developing an approach – one that is a contextually sensitive and a South African model for providing transitional support. The approach outlines a positive youth development practice that is strengths-based and collaborative. Focus is placed on building networks of support and marking growth through ceremonies and rites of passage. 

Presenters
CM

Carolyn Mak

Carolyn Mak is the Director of Knowledge Mobilization and Program Development. She holds a Masters of Social Work, and brings years of experience as a school social worker and individual counsellor in children’s mental health and family service agencies. Besides working directly with children, teens and adults, she has developed and presented posters, papers and workshops on adolescent mental health in cultural contexts, the use of... Read More →
GJ

Gerald Jacobs

Gerald Jacobs is the Leader of a Transitional Support Program for care leavers at Mamelani Projects in Cape Town, South Africa. The program focuses on walking alongside young people transitioning from state care and has recently partnered with the local government department to develop an approach to transitional support for care leavers. Gerald is a Youth Worker and started his career 13 years ago doing street outreach at The Homestead (Projects... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer First

Jennifer First

Mental Health Program Manager, Disaster and Community Crisis Center
Jennifer First, MA, MSW is the Mental Health Program Manager for the Disaster and Community Crisis Center at the University of Missouri. Her clinical experience includes providing services for families and children experiencing homelessness, poverty, domestic violence, sexual assault, and natural disasters. First is a PhD student and graduate instructor in the School of Social Work at the University of Missouri. Her research interests include... Read More →
ML

Madelyn Labella

Madelyn is a third year graduate student in the joint child development and clinical science program at the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota. She is a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow whose interests include intervening to promote healthy parenting and emotional development in families experiencing severe sociodemographic risk.
MM

Myrna McNitt

Myrna is on the Board of the International Foster Care Organization and chairs its Training & Development Committee. She travels extensively and has earned an international reputation for the quality of her teaching and training. Work experience includes specialized foster care in England and supervising graduate students in international field placements. She has published on recruitment and retention of foster parents.
avatar for Rebecca Fairchild

Rebecca Fairchild

Registered Music Therapist; PhD Candidate, Bethany; The University of Melbourne
Rebecca Fairchild is a Registered Music Therapist from Australia. She works part time as a music therapy group facilitator at Bethany, supporting children and families living in crisis due to homelessness and family violence. Rebecca is a PhD candidate at The University of Melbourne, researching the ways that pre-adolescent children use music as a mechanism for enhancing their resilience throughout their experience of living in crisis. Rebecca... Read More →

Co-Presenters
KK

Kathleen Kufeldt

Adjunct Professor at University of New Brunswick | Kathleen has worked in a children's residence, front line child protection, fostered teenagers, and has an international reputation for foster care research. Academic positions include Assistant Deanship in the Faculty of Social Work in Calgary, and Chai


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Seminar 7 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Mental Health & Therapy -Lynne Scrimgeour, Francine Julien-Gauthier, Sharon McCloskey, Josh Cameron, Sarah Henderson, Eva Adriana Wilson
Mental Health & Therapy:

Abstract # 18
Building Resilience For Adults With Mental Health Problems
Presenter: Josh Cameron Co - Presenters: Mair Reardon
Abstract:
This presentation reports on the design, implementation and research evaluation of a co-created resilience building programme for adults with mental health problems. The programme comprises 8 weekly sessions developed by a partnership of a peer trainer, a mental health practitioner and an academic. Peer trainers are people with lived experience of mental health problems who are have been recruited and are supported by the local Recovery College which is an established initiative involving a partnership of the health service providers and service user organisations. 
The programme content drew on an adapted version of the Resilience Framework (Hart et al 2007) and a range of other resilience tools and models alongside the personal, practice and research expertise of the facilitators. It aimed to increase participants’ resilience to respond on an individual and collective basis to the adversities they face using internal and external resources and supports. The project is one site of a wider multi-national UK research council funded project which aims to explore the potential for community university partnerships to make better and more resilient collective futures.  It also aims to develop resilience theory and practice particularly as they apply to communities and the potential to challenge sources of adversity.

Abstract # 21
Using Resilient Therapy In Practice: Family-Based Resilience Interventions
Presenter: Sarah Henderson
Abstract:
Newport Mind and boingboing have been researching the use of Resilient Therapy over 18 months. We have been measuring and evaluating the resilience framework and its effectiveness in our work with young people and families in the community of Newport. With a focus on mental wellbeing, the resilience framework has been applied to practice with families utilising an action research approach. All aspects of resilience theory and practice has been, and continues to be, explored during the day to day practice of the team, shaping the support provision for families who experience complex adversity, alongside dealing with mental health problems. The framework has been adapted to include a holistic view of resilience within a family unit, highlighting the importance of group dynamics and relationships for the promotion and sustainability of resilience. Key input of families has enabled our practice to focus on the operational challenges that families face on a day to day basis. ‘By designing the services that met the needs of our son and us as his parents, were invaluable. This service is a need’ - a parent of a young person experiencing low mood/ self-esteem. Families highlighted the ease of use of the framework due to its design; however highlight the need for adaptation of the terminology for use as a family unit. The partnership provides opportunities for practitioners to focus support provision on theory based interventions that develop resilience in family units.

Abstract # 29
A Framework helping people move from Helpless to Healthy
Presenter: Dr. Eva Adriana Wilson
Abstract:
We are biologically designed to be healthy and we are self-correcting by nature.  The only way we have to tell us if we are on track or off track is through negative feedback. 
If we don’t eat for many hours, we get a stomach-ache, and if we ignore it…it gets worse. If we step on a nail...it hurts, and if we ignore it, it gets worse and maybe even life threatening. 
It is the same with our emotional life…We get anxious when interacting with someone who is mistreating us as a way to signal that something is not ok and take action to be healthy and safe again.
If we learned to ignore our strong and healthy self, it turns into Anxiety, Depression, or unhealthy coping (ie. Eating disorders, drugs, alcohol, promiscuity, cutting, etc).
When this happens, we get stuck focusing on the unhealthy coping as the problem. Sometimes we need medication to help us do the work, but medication alone won’t make us happy if we don’t address the situation that is causing the distress.
 
It is by focusing on this framework we can help people move from HELPLESS to HEALTHY, from PANIC to PRODUCTIVITY.  

Abstract # 27
Balancing Risk and Responsibility: The Fulcrum for Resilience in Children with Autism
Presenter: Lynne Scrimgeour 
Abstract:
For families parenting a child with Autism, especially when the diagnosis co-occurs with mental health disorders, it can be challenging to balance the level of risk and responsibility that researchers and professionals believe can strengthen resilience. However, successful outcomes in goals targeting 'responsibility' have been a platform for families to consider goals that may involve a higher level of 'risk'. Increasing the student's level of responsibility in areas of daily living, communication, socialisation and learning requires skills in planning, flexible thinking and self-control. We understand that children are not born with broad executive functioning and self-regulation skills. We also acknowledge that children with Autism can have specific challenges in these areas which in turn have implications for resiliency. For students with Autism, being able to complete tasks more independently builds self-identity. This knowledge of self sends a powerful message to others. If we explicitly link the achievement of small yet defined roles and levels of responsibility to resilience, this has the potential to increase family and teacher engagement in therapeutic goals. We need to continue the conversation around dignity of risk so that families and students can advocate for future services that centre on the capacity of the whole person.

Abstract # 48
Strategies To Develop And Consolidate Resilience For People With Intellectual Disabilities
Presenter: Francine Julien-Gauthier Co - Presenters: Sarah Martin-Roy, Colette Jourdan-Ionescu
Abstract:
Resilience is the ability to deal with a condition or a particular context and to consider the future with confidence and positiveness. For people with intellectual disabilities, resilience is to present the best possible development adressing specific adversities that are encountered in order to aim well-being and a full social integration (Jourdan-Ionescu & Julien-Gauthier, 2011). This paper’s intention is to identify factors that promote resilience for people with intellectual disabilities as well as strategies to facilitate its development and consolidation. The study is based on the theoretical framework of assisted resilience, which favors a support intervention focused on strengthening the capacity of people with real support, responsive to their aspirations and needs. The instrument used to assess resilience is The Resilience Scale (Wagnild & Young, 1993, adapted by Julien-Gauthier, Jourdan-Ionescu & Ruel, 2013). The results identify five elements that promote, facilitate and strengthen resilience for people with intellectual disabilities. Strategies are proposed: adapting one’s educational intervention plan (EIP) and improving the communication and interaction of the individual with the environment and its community members.

Abstract # 51
Growing Resilience In Parents Of Children With Complex Health Needs: The Development And Testing Of A Structured Support Programme
Presenter: Sharon McCloskey
Abstract:
Caring for children with complex healthcare needs places parents under additional strains compared to other parents with regard to their physical and emotional health, relationships and economic welfare.  Yet great variation exists in how parents and families facing similar circumstances cope, with some exhibiting negative consequences of caring while others cope well and thrive. How families cope is linked to resilience. Research confirms the potential for resilience to be enhanced and group based interventions are one approach through which this may be promoted.  Through this facilitated discussion I will outline the work undertaken to develop a programme with this group of parents (phase 1 of a 2 part study).  A pragmatic research design was applied with adherence to the main principles and social justice goals of transformative research.  The programme was developed through an iterative series of workshops and focus groups with parents which explored the demands they experience, what helps them to cope and what they would consider helpful in a programme.  Their views have been linked with existing theory and research outcomes to develop a programme which takes account of the research evidence but has been shaped by the population it seeks to help. It will be tested in phase 2.

Presenters
avatar for Eva Adriana Wilson

Eva Adriana Wilson

Psychiatrist and Director, Inspired Living Medical
Dr. Wilson runs an innovative Psychiatric practice that promotes wellness, not just the absence of disease ,through coaching people to listen to their strong and healthy self and empowering them to live their values. She works with youth and adults and has also published a children's book helping children cope with people's expectations and put downs. Dr. Wilson strives to create and distribute mental health resources promoting resilience and... Read More →
avatar for Francine Julien-Gauthier

Francine Julien-Gauthier

Professor in the Education Faculty, Université Laval
Professor at Université Laval, Francine Julien-Gauthier, Ph. D., is professor in the Education Faculty at Université Laval. Regular researcher for Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES), she conducts studies on the education of individuals with intellectual disabilities and social inclusion for optimal social participation. She is particularly interested with transition periods: from childcare to school and... Read More →
avatar for Josh Cameron

Josh Cameron

Principal Lecturer, University of Brighton/BoingBoing
Principal Lecturer at University of BrightonJosh Cameron was an occupational therapist in adult mental health services before becoming a senior lecturer in occupational therapy at the University of Brighton. He became interested in resilience while researching return-to-work experiences of workers with mental health problems for his PhD. He is a member of the ‘Boing Boing’: resilience research and practice network... Read More →
avatar for Lynne Scrimgeour

Lynne Scrimgeour

Speech Pathologist Team Leader, Autism Association of Western Australia
Lynne Scrimgeour is a Speech Pathologist with over 30 years experience across health, education, community, private practice and disability sectors. Lynne is currently employed at a large non-government Autism-specific organisation as a Senior Speech Pathologist. She is responsible for embedding family and student goals into transdisciplinary interventions that promote positive and measurable change. As case manager and team leader, Lynne has... Read More →
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Sarah Henderson

Sarah Henderson is a Family Wellbeing and Resilience Worker at the mental health charity Newport Mind, in partnership with the University of Brighton and the Families First government initiative in Newport, South Wales. She graduated with a BSc Psychology degree in 2012 and has since completed Health and Social Care related training. Sarah's practice, and that of members of her team, is based on working with the resilience framework, developed by... Read More →
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Sharon McCloskey

Sharon McCloskey is a registered nurse. She has worked in the field of children's palliative care and supported children with complex health needs and their families for 20 years. She is particularly interested in factors that help build resilience in parents and families of children with complex health needs and is currently completing a PhD intervention study to develop and test the feasibility of a structured support programme to enhance... Read More →

Co-Presenters
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Colette Jourdan-Ionescu

Professor at Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières | Colette Jourdan-Ionescu, Ph. D. is professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, researcher for the Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES) and the Scientific Council of the Association francophone psychology and psychopathology in children and adolescents. She led the Quebec Journal... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Martin-Roy

Sarah Martin-Roy

Université Laval
Research assistant and student member for Consortium national de recherche sur l’intégration sociale (CNRIS) and Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES). Her research focuses on students (18-21 years old) with intellectual disabilities participation in their transition from school to active life. She is also interested in vocational development, socio-professional integration as well as issues related to... Read More →
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Mair Reardon

Lead Occupational Therapist Education & Training, Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Mair Reardon is the Lead Occuational Therapist for Education and Training at Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. She has worked predominately in adult mental health services. Her interest in resilience stems from seeing the impact an individual’s resilience has on their recovery and a desire to develop resilience practice within adult mental health services. She is currently working with mental health service users and the ‘BoingBoing... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Mental Health & Youth Voices -Lisa Evanoff, Kelli Sirianni, Danielle Root, Petro Erasmus, Ria Schroder, Linda Liebenberg
Mental Health & Youth Voices:

Abstract #3
Mobilizing the Power of Community In Nunavut to Protect from Suicide
Presenter: Lisa Evanoff
Abstract:
This session will look at how the Canadian Red Cross is working with a territorial partner, the Embrace Life Council, to reduce suicide by mobilizing communities through prevention education. This unique partnership funded by the Government of Nunavut aims to provide community  training and action planning; vital violence prevention training at the school and community level and cultural specific workshops to link traditions and modern realities. Using a framework called Ten Steps to Creating Safe Environments for Children and Youth, the outcome is a community-owned plan that is driven and implemented by communities. From there adults and children and youth are trained in all aspects of violence prevention. To date 10 of the 26 communities have taken the training.

Abstract # 13
Project BLAST: Breaking Barriers, Loving Yourself, Accepting Others, Similarities not Differences and Totally Inclusive Experience
Presenter: Kelli Sirianni
Abstract:
This research focuses on the one-day event, Project BLAST, and its intrinsic and extrinsic impact on student and adult participants. BLAST stands for: breaking barriers, loving yourself, accepting others, similarities not differences, and totally inclusive experience. Using small and large group activities, BLAST is a transformational day and described by many as ‘an eye-opening experience’. Its philosophy is that when one feels accepted, capable and competent, they are able to develop, positively adapt and to feel and be resilient. Resilience is crucial to one’s ability to develop into a socially competent citizen, and for this reason, must be incorporated as an element of character education. Education must target all aspects of the student, including the academic, personal and social self. Former adult participants were interviewed on the impact this event has had on them as adults, including short and long term implications, as well as its perceptive impact on students. Evaluative feedback forms collected from student participants after each event were incorporated into the qualitative thematic data analysis in drawing conclusions. Findings indicate BLAST as having an impact on resilience and sense of belonging as well as on the presence of respect, empathy, support and compassion/acceptance, among its student and adult participants. 

Abstract # 56
What Healthy Attachments Mean To Aboriginals
Presenter: Danielle Root 
Abstract:
Aboriginal populations are too often studied for what is "wrong" with them.  Initially, my research interest entailed finding ways to foster healthy attachments between young Aboriginal mothers and their young children in the "critical age range" (0-33 months).  I thought about ways in which we can help decolonize some of the learned, unhealthy parenting practices as a result of colonization.  Although this is still my ultimate research goal, I have learned that there is a gap in what is known to be "healthy attachments" in the context of Aboriginals.  Therefore, instead of going with what traditional attachment theories suggest as being "healthy" attachments, I must first give self-determination back to those with whom I wish to help foster those healthy attachments; the young Aboriginal mothers.   By first asking the question of what attachment means to them, I will have a better understanding of how to help foster it.  While it is important that we not ignore the negative effects that colonization has had, and continues to have on our people, I believe that focusing on our strengths is the most critical step in the process of decolonization.

Abtsract # 41
Eliciting The Life Story When Working With Adolescents: Introducing The Fortune Teller As A New Creative Technique
Presenter: Petro Erasmus
Abstract:
This paper aims to introduce a new and innovative technique for eliciting the life story when working with adolescents.  The fortune teller is a paper folding technique that has been part of play in various cultures. This paper folding technique has been adapted by the author as a creative tool for use in therapautic settings when working with adolescents to elicit their life story. This paper will exlain the rationale for using this technique in individual therapy and counselling ‘settings to elicite the life story and help the adolescent to explore their life stories.  The information obtained through this techniques offers the therapist insight into the emotional well-being of the adolescent by focusing on life themes, self-concept,  identities, self-talk, coping mechanims, traumas and hope (dreams and aspirations).  It contributes to facilitating understanding for the adolescent of their ego states and thought processes.  This technique contributes to establishing the therapeutic trust relationship in the first session and it can be used in individual and group settings in working with children who experiences trauma such as divorce, bullying, bereavement. The adolescent becomes an active participant in planning the therapeutic sessions as this technique allows them to understand the aims of therapy and  reduces resistance to therapy.

Abstract # 57
Building Resilience – Including The Voice Of Youth In Research: Managing The Ethical Dilemmas
Presenter: Ria Schroder Co - Presenters: Linda Liebenberg
Abstract:
Including youth voices in research is not only fundamental to promoting youth resilience by providing genuine opportunities for participation and empowerment, it is also fundamental to research concerned with understanding youth related issues.  Conducting research that includes a diverse range of youth participants, and incorporates use of youth friendly technologies for data collection offers an exciting opportunity for many researchers.  These possibilities become even more exciting when youth are included as part of the project team.  These same possibilities can also become extremely challenging, even to the point of abandonment, when such projects come before ethical review committees.  In this presentation we will highlight i) some of the dilemmas that are perceived by ethical review committees to exist around “youth friendly research” and, ii) the barriers these assumptions create for including youth in research.  We will also reflect on the ethical dilemma these assumptions pose in terms of reducing/eliminating youth voices from research where they are essential.  Strategies for working with ethical review committees to manage these dilemmas will be discussed.

Abstract # 62
Meaningfully Engaging Youth In Research And Evaluation
Presenter: Linda Liebenberg
Abstract:
This facilitated discussion will present core lessons gained from experiences of youth participants and researchers engaged in several research projects internationally. Specifically, we will present key points to elicit discussion around the following three questions: 1. Why should we engage youth meaningfully in research and evaluation? 2. How do we engage youth meaningfully in research/evaluation and dissemination of findings?3. How are community partners (including youth participants) working with researchers to protect the best interests of youth in the research/evaluation process?The focus will be on research and evaluation with youth living in challenging socioeconomically marginalised contexts. The goal of Understanding meaningful engagement is to facilitate connection and knowledge sharing between a diverse group of actors engaged in research (i.e. researchers, community-partners, and youth research participants); and to generate new knowledge about how to meaningfully engage youth in research and evaluation so as to reverse the flow of knowledge from marginalised and often silenced youth to adults in positions of decision-making power.

Presenters
avatar for Danielle Root

Danielle Root

STUDENT, MOUNT SAINT VINCENT UNIVERSITY
Danielle Root is from Listuguj First Nation, Quebec. In the year 2000, she came to Halifax, Nova Scotia and completed her Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Psychology at Saint Mary's University. Since coming to Halifax, Danielle has been actively involved in the Aboriginal community in various capacities; working with, and for Aboriginals is a passion for her. After having her first child, who is now 2 years old, Danielle decided to return to... Read More →
KS

Kelli Sirianni

Kelli Sirianni has received her B.A.[H], B.Ed and M.Ed with thesis from the University of Windsor. Her research interests include the building of resilience, sense of belonging and an overall positive school climate, specifically through an event she has run for four years in local high schools and at the post-secondary level called Project BLAST, a one-day event that aims to bond the school population through the realization of common... Read More →
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg, PhD., Co-Director Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, is a researcher and evaluator with a core interest in children and youth with complex needs. Her work explores the promotion of positive youth development and mental health, using formal and informal processes of resilience, through both evaluation of service provision and research of youth experiences. As a key component of this work, Linda reflects... Read More →
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Petro Erasmus

I am a senior lecturer in the Department of Psychology at the North West University where I teach Developmental Psychology and Positive Psychology and I am the coordinator of the Honors course. I also have a private practice which is called the Child and Family Guidance and Development Centre. My research focus areas are emotional intelligence, adolescent development, second language maths achievement and resilience.
RS

Ria Schroder

Ria Schroder (PhD) completed her PhD at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand in 2004 and since that time has been an active member of the Collaborative team. In September 2012 Ria was employed as the Research Manager for the Collaborative. She is also a Research Fellow at the National Addiction Centre, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. Ria has undertaken and supervised a number of research and evaluation studies in the area... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg, PhD., Co-Director Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, is a researcher and evaluator with a core interest in children and youth with complex needs. Her work explores the promotion of positive youth development and mental health, using formal and informal processes of resilience, through both evaluation of service provision and research of youth experiences. As a key component of this work, Linda reflects... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Policing, Policy & Advocacy -Nancy Ross, Megan Longley, John Yee, Ericka Kimball, Yvonne Vissing
Policing, Policy & Advocacy:

Abstract # 30
The Bridgewater Police:  Innovative Collaborators Supporting Individuals In Challenging Contexts
Presenter: Nancy Ross Co-presenters: Sue Bookchin, John W. Collyer
Abstract:
Throughout the collaborative community response initiated by the ‘Be the Peace, Make a Change’ project to reduce interpersonal violence in Lunenburg County, the Bridgewater Police have been key stake-holders.   The coordinators of this project, funded by the Status for Women Canada for three years, hope the initiatives started will be sustained beyond the project funding, by community partnerships. The Bridgewater Police have been innovative partners.  For example, leadership of the ongoing development of the Community Dispute Resolution Center (CDRC) has been transferred to the Bridgewater Police Chief, John Collier. The ongoing participation of the Police in this project, along with other community partnerships has resulted in new and innovative models that will increase both the resiliency of the community and support pathways to resiliency of individuals. Bridgewater Police are also key stakeholders in the Municipal Alcohol Project that aims to both prevent and respond better to alcohol-related harms.  The Bridgewater Police have also partnered with local women’s organization to improve responses to sexual assault.  Individual Police officers mentor individual youth. This presentation will highlight the ways in which the Bridgewater Police prioritize collaborative engagement in the community that aims to support individuals in challenging contexts.

Abstract # 34
Beyond The Tip Of The Iceberg: A Holistic Approach To Advocating For Youth
Presenter: Megan Longley
Abstract:
Traditionally Nova Scotia Legal Aid has provided representation to youth charged with criminal offenses.  We are now taking a new approach to our representation of youth by looking at how we can address or help with the issues that contributed to the criminal engagement. Any youth in HRM, incluidng those with no criminal law issues, can come to us with any social justice issue and will get to meet with a lawyer for service ranging from summary advice to full service. The areas we are, so far, addressing including school and school board issues, DCS issues, criminal record issues, PPA negotiations, assistance negotiating access to mental health services or housing and DMV appeals. The assistance we provide ranges from informal (call to a principal or grouphome) to formal (representationa t a school board hearing) or anything in between. Often youth need help beyond the legal so we are offering to provide whatever level of help they need navigating or fighting the system they want to access. Many youth we serve do not have adults who can be an available or effective advocate for them when dealing with these problems so we want to help youth have a voice when trying to obtain services to which they are entitled. I believe this legal aid approach to holistic youth social justice and criminal law is unique in this province and possibly in the country and we are excited to share what we are doing.

Abstract # 65
Coming Up For Air
Presenter: John Yee
Abstract:
Instead of examining resilience by conducting a random sample to represent a specific population, I am proposing to examine another feature of resilience from members in a specific group. I am also a member of this group: a trauma response unit. We attend to trauma experienced by law enforcement officers. There are about 80 members in this group, and we are on call on an average of one week per month. 
We know what to say when we attend to others who are faced with stressful incidences that affect their ability to function in their normal day to day activities. But what if we are affected ourselves by stressful incidences? Do we know what to do? How would we handle it? This paper examines some of the common ways we pull ourselves out of a rut.    
My method of research: qualitative analysis, survey, and brief follow-up interview by email to elaborate on established themes or patterns arrived at from the survey.

Abstract # 33
A Place At The Table:  Incorporating Voices And Perspectives Of Those Who Experienced Domestic Violence In Childhood
Presenter: Ericka Kimball 
Abstract:
For more than 30 years the movement to end domestic violence has focused on increasing safety, freedom, and autonomy for victims and their children. Over that time, our understanding of children’s experiences of domestic violence has evolved significantly. Initially, programs responded to children as “secondary victims” and provided services exclusively to the abused parent based on the fair assumption that increasing safety and well-being would also increase the safety and well-being of children. Soon, with new research on the impact of “witnessing” domestic violence, programs began to respond to children’s needs directly – offering separate services that addressed safety planning, processing complex feelings, and promoting strengths. Now we are on the cusp of a second wave of the movement – one where those who experienced domestic violence as children are now adults who are making a place in the social justice arena. The AEDVC Leadership Forum is emerging as leaders to bring visibility to this experience and to impact new directions for policy, service provision, and advocacy on behalf of children exposed to domestic violence. In this facilitated discussion, we want to explore key strategies for incorporating the voices and perspectives of children exposed to domestic violence in understanding resilience.

Abstract # 36
Resiliency And Rights: A Conceptual Model
Presenter: Yvonne Vissing 
Abstract:
This paper explores the relationship between resiliency and the presence of community support for child rights.  The United Nations (UN) created the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) 25 years ago and it has become the most endorsed human rights act in the world.  Only two UN countries (Somalia and the USA) have not signed, ratified and implemented the UNCRC. Research with international child scholars in the United Kingdom and Ireland has led to my speaking at the UNCRC’s 25th anniversary in Amsterdam this fall.  A mixed-methods design has been employed to analyze about the relationship between child rights and resiliency.  I have created a theoretical model that explores the interface between these variables that proposes resiliency is heightened when there are formalized legal mandates that support child rights.  While resiliency in children may be possible for those in countries where there are few child protection laws, the lack of community support, resource and infrastructure makes it much more challenging.  The position of this paper is that supporting child rights is directly correlated with higher well-being, empowerment and resiliency for children and youth.



Presenters
EK

Ericka Kimball

Ericka Kimball, PhD, LISW is an Assistant Professor at Portland State University in Portland, OR. In addition to conducting research in the area of child exposure to domestic violence, she is a founding member of the Adults who Experience Domestic Violence in Childhood Leadership forum. She has worked with Casey Keene and other leading researchers in the field of violence against women and children exposed to domestic violence to develop and... Read More →
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John Yee

I am a doctoral candidate at University of Liverpool, England. I completed my post master’s in counselling psychology at Athabasca University, Canada. For the last 15 years, my research is in the realm of neurology and optometry. I have published six peer reviewed papers on this topic. I am interested in resilience research because my proposed thesis would overlap this topic.
avatar for Megan Longley

Megan Longley

Managing Lawyer Youth Justice, Nova Scotia Legal Aid - Youth Justice Office
I was called to the bar in 1995 and have worked with Nova Scotia Legal Aid since 1999. The bulk of my work has been in youth criminal law, and I became manager of the Youth Office in 2011. I have recently started working with youth beyond criminal justice in areas of social justice and administrative law.
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Nancy Ross

Nancy Ross, Assistant Professor, Dalhousie School of Social Work for the past two years, has, to date, spent the majority of her working life in addiction and mental health settings. Her work with women led her to believe that the personal is connected to the political and to her work to help coordinate and research community responses to violence. She is hoping to complete her dissertation this year in Peace Studies at the University of... Read More →
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Yvonne Vissing

Yvonne Vissing, PhD, is Professor of Sociology at Salem State University where she is the founding director of their Center for Childhood & Youth Studies. Author of six books, she is a former National Institute of Mental Health Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Whiting Foundation Fellow, and speaker at the UN on the rights of children.

Co-Presenters
SB

Sue Bookchin

Co-Coordinator at Be the Peace Project | Sue has been a facilitator, trainer and coach for over 20 years. In all her work, it is particularly rewarding when people recognize something in one another they can connect with. When there is excitement in pursuing what we care deeply about, in camaraderie with others, it is truly inspiring. The ‘Be the Peace’ project has ignited that kind of excitement in Sue. "As we come together for... Read More →
JC

John Collyer

Chief of Police at Bridgewater Police Department | John Collyer, Chief of the Bridgewater Police Department, received the Minster’s Award for Leadership in Crime Prevention. He has been an In School Mentor through Big Brothers Big Sisters and a volunteer facilitator for the South Shore Community Justice Society for ten years.Chief Collyer is Treasurer of the Nova Scotia Chiefs of Police Association, Board Member of 211NS, and a member... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Shatford Room A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Resilience in Adverse Settings -Consuelo Elizabeth Mendez-Shannon, Ihsana Sabriani Borualogo, Julie Tippens, Sofie Vindevogel, Amarnath Amarasingam, Jennifer Bernier
Resilience In Adverse Settings:

Abstract # 9
Undocumented Latino Immigrants: A Story Of Suffering, Strength And Identity.
Presenter: Consuelo Elizabeth Mendez-Shannon Co - Presenters: Jo Daugherty Bailey
Abstract:
This poster summarizes key findings from a qualitative study about how undocumented Latino immigrants deal with adversity while living in an urban city in the U.S.  Through semi-structured interviews, narratives demonstrated key protective factors prevalent in the community. 
Key facilitators that were helpful during their initial transition into the U.S included getting help in finding a job, knowing someone in the U.S before immigrating, being connected to support networks, and receiving support from others who shared their struggles. The obstacles they continuously face are language barriers, limited education and unfair work wages. At the same time, another common theme reveals how they transform suffering using personal strengths and drawing on support from close-knit communities.  Through it all, they shared that they maintained an identity of seemingly having two lives one originating in Mexico and the other of their current residence in the US.
Recommendations for social work practice include using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual approach and a strengths perspective with narratives.  Participants described a three-tiered community network suggesting distinctions from a close-knit network outward to general Latino-based support and further out to a community resident network including teachers and medical doctors. 

Abstract # 38
Resilience of Bataknese, Minangnese, And Sundanese Youth Migrants Who Study In Bandung.
Presenter: Ihsana Sabriani Borualogo Co - Presenters: Fons van de Vijver
Abstract:
The aim of this study is to get the new concepts on resilience which is emic and specific in the context of Indonesian culture on three ethnic groups (Bataknese, Minangnese and Sundanese). It is also aims to test the effect of value system and cultural value of migration on resilience. Bataknese have a value system that strongly supports members to leave the area to study. Core to this value system are characteristics like being persistent and diligent, and willing to try and work hard. This study tested a new model of resilience in the context of migration. More specifically, the model postulates that the value system vis-à-vis migration other vales, and social support have an influence on self-esteem, which in turn influences resilience, which in turn influences well-being. Data were collected through questionnaires to 712 respondents who were selected by random cluster sampling technique. The data were statistically analyzed by SEM using Lisrel. Self-esteem plays an important role as a mediating variable to help youth migrants to have resilience. Social support explained the important role of social environment and helped the youth migrants building their self-worth. Social life values helped youth migrants to build their self-esteem, so that they are able to have resilience. Resilience determined satisfaction with life in youth migrants. Culture affected psychological factors in youth migrants, such as value system, cultural value, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life. Cultural values affected resilience through those psychological factors.

Abstract # 60
Do Survival Mechanisms Equal Resilience?  The Case Of The Banyamulenge Church Raid In Nairobi, Kenya.
Presenter: Julie Tippens
Abstract:
In times of extreme chaos, can survival be classified as a form of resilience? The goal of this segment is to explore the relationships that exist among “chaos narratives,” resilience-fostering techniques and psychosocial health outcomes in situations of distress. 
This conversation is framed using the example of a May 2014 police raid on ethnic Banyamulenge Congolese refugee church-goers in a low-income neighborhood in Kenya. Those arrested were abused and beaten, and eventually taken to a refugee camp along the Kenya-Somalia border. Several families were cleaved in this particular raid, with more than 200 children separated from their parents or main caregivers 
Based on a subset of in-depth interviews (N=15), group discussions (N=2) and survey research (N=70) with urban Banyamulenge refugees who were affected by this raid, this segment will address survival mechanisms used by individuals, households and the community. Using a social-ecological lens, this conversation will ask questions pertaining to what structures promote and/or foster resilience (and for whom in what contexts), as well as whether survival in and of itself can be classified within a resilience framework.

Abstract # 61
A Relational Approach: Integrating Individualist And Collectivist Perspectives On The Resilience Of War-Affected Children
Presenter: Sofie Vindevogel
Abstract:
This presentation aims to reflect upon the tenets of an individualist and collectivist approach to resilience and to consider the implications of prioritizing individual or collective resilience in policy, research and practice initiatives for children living in (post-)conflict areas. It delineates that an individualist view risks holding individuals accountable for possible difficulties experienced in the aftermath of war, while disregarding the context on which their well-being strongly depends. As such, social issues may be interpreted as individual failures, leaving structural barriers and deficiencies unquestioned. The collectivist tradition, however, lead to underestimating individual efforts, strengths, and self-determination, and result in an overly standardized approach that is supposed to fit all. An understanding of resilience as a manifestation of relational dynamics, linking both individual and collective responses to the challenges of war, helps to counter the limitations of both traditions as it carves out the space for acknowledging individual experiences and efforts as well as the importance of the broader context and collective world. As a consequence, the primary concern is no longer to identify the locus of core resources and support mechanisms, but the understanding of the dynamic interplay of individual and collective responses to the encountered challenges that enable resilience in the face of armed conflict.

Abstract # 63
Barriers To Violent Radicalization: Understanding Pathways To Resilience Among Canadian Youth
Presenter: Amarnath Amarasingam Co - Presenters: Sarah Morgan
Abstract:
As many scholars and policy analysts have made clear, the nature of contemporary terrorism and political violence is evolving. While terrorist violence has indeed been rare in Canada, we are nevertheless not immune from it. Cases like the Air India bombing of 1985, the Toronto 18 plot of 2006, as well as instances of Canadian youth travelling overseas to fight on behalf of foreign groups like Al-Qaeda, Al-Shabaab in Somalia, and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam in Sri Lanka are all cause for concern. While it is important to understand what radicalizes youth to the point of violence, it is also important to identify culturally specific and population wide factors that support the engagement of youth without that engagement leading to violence. Our study, based on year-long field research with the Somali community in Toronto and the indigenous population of Northern Ontario, investigates the social ecologies of resilience that prevent violent extremism. Our methodology is equally innovative, building on the use of mixed methods designs and visual methodologies to explore the hidden, unnamed protective processes that are part of young people’s lives when they are exposed to, and resist, violent extremism.

Abstract # 17
I Am BRAVE: Building Resilience Through Anti-Violence Education.
Presenter: Jennifer Bernier
Abstract:
Stop Now & Plan (SNAP®) is an evidence-based, gender specific, cognitive behavioural program for children under the age of 12 who experience significant externalizing behaviours (i.e. oppositional and conduct issues). These behaviours may include bullying or being mean to others, making threats, being physically aggressive towards or hurting others, not listening, missing school, having negative peers associations, and stealing. At the Centre for Building Resilience through Anti-Violence Education (BRAVE), a unique replication of the SNAP® program is offered specifically for girls aged 6-11 years living in the Halifax Regional Municipality to decrease internalizing and externalizing behaviours such as bullying, delinquency, anxiety, and future criminalization. To reach its goals, BRAVE provides a comprehensive set of gender-specific SNAP® services to girls, their families and peers both in the community and schools that address multiple risk factors, build resilience, and promote healthy childhood development. A gender specific approach is essential, as the context of girls’ behavioural concerns with bullying, delinquency, and criminalization can often differ from boys.
The three aspects of our work that we would like to discuss during the facilitated discussion, includes the importance of providing comprehensive, gender-specific, community-based interventions for children. …

Presenters
AA

Amarnath Amarasingam

Amarnath Amarasingam is a Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Resilience Research Centre at Dalhousie University. He is the author of Pain, Pride, and Politics: Sri Lankan Tamil Activism in Canada (University of Georgia Press, in press). His research interests are in diaspora politics, post-war reconstruction, surveillance, social movements, radicalization and terrorism, media studies... Read More →
avatar for Consuelo Elizabeth Mendez-Shannon

Consuelo Elizabeth Mendez-Shannon

Assistant Professor, MSU Denver
Dr. Mendez-Shannon, MSW is an Assistant Professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver, U.S.A. She served the Harlem community for 10 years in the areas of child welfare, community activism, and immigrant rights. She helped mobilize New York City with disaster relief during the 9/11 attacks. In Colorado she worked at a community clinic as a Behavior Health Specialist focusing on integrated care. She co-leads university and community... Read More →
avatar for Ihsana Sabriani Borualogo

Ihsana Sabriani Borualogo

Lecturer, Bandung Islamic University
Ihsana Sabriani Borualogo is a lecturer in The Faculty of Psychology in Universitas Islam Bandung in Bandung, Western Java, Indonesia.She is interested in cross-cultural psychology studies, especially on resilience, value systems, and issues on developmental psychology.In 2012, she had an opportunity to go to Tilburg University, Netherlands for a sandwich-like program and did research supervised by Prof. Fons van de Vijver.She finished her... Read More →
JB

Jennifer Bernier

Jennifer Bernier, PhD., is the Founder and Executive Director of the Centre for Building Resilience through Anti-Violence Education (BRAVE). Jennifer provides leadership to achieve BRAVE’s commitments to address bullying, delinquency and criminalization among girls aged 6-11 with significant social and behavioural challenges. She guides a comprehensive set of services for the girls, their families, and peers based on the world renowned... Read More →
avatar for Julie Tippens

Julie Tippens

Julie A. Tippens, MA, MPH is a doctor of public health candidate at the University of Arizona, where she is also pursuing a doctoral minor and graduate certificate in medical anthropology. Her research lends anthropological insight into issues of forced migration and refugee psychosocial wellbeing, and she is particularly passionate about identifying community-based strategies that foster resilience and healing in post-conflict settings. Julie... Read More →
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Sofie Vindevogel

Ghent University
Sofie Vindevogel works as post-doctoral assistant at the Department of Special Education at Ghent University and is affiliated to the Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations. She obtained her PhD in Educational Sciences with a dissertation on former child soldiers in northern Uganda, focusing on experienced challenges and resources in the transition from military to civilian life. Her current empirical research explores further how children... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JD

Jo Daugherty Bailey

Associate Professor and the MSW Program Director at Metropolitan State University of Denver | Jo Daugherty Bailey, Ph.D., MSW is Associate Professor and the MSW Program Director at Metropolitan State University of Denver. Dr. Bailey has taught across the curriculum in both sociology and social work in family, gender, social policy, urban issues and theory. She has published articles in policy and practice in the areas of divorce, adoption... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Morgan

Sarah Morgan

Site Researcher 
avatar for Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver

Professor at Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands | Fons van de Vijver holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia. He has (co-)authored over 400 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. He is a former editor of the Journal of... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Boardroom A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Indigenous Perspectives - Bernadette Iahtail, Nicolette Teufel-Shone, Eliana Suarez
Indigenous Perspectives:

Abstract #193
Aboriginal Fathers Love Their Children Too!
Presenter: Bernadette Lahtail
This workshop will present the results of five focus groups with Aboriginal fathers from local reserves and urban dwellers, and with caseworkers and supervisors involved with child welfare. This process culminated with joint sharing circle where the fathers and practitioners were able to learn from each other. The workshop will highlight our findings and recommendations for policy and practice, and present a powerful film based on these life experiences, also entitled " Aboriginal Fathers are parents too!" We plan to involve the audience In deepening our knowledge of the Issue from the perspective of seasoned social work practitioners who can enrich our knowledge, with a particular emphasis on unpacking the root causes that contribute to the exclusion of fathers who desire greater involvement with their children, but who are too often kept a distance. The session will provide an opportunity for reflective casework  practice, an examination of systemic biases and attitudes, and an exploration of pragmatic alternatives to the situation.

Abstract #259
Role of Community Health Representatives in Building Resilience in Native Communities
Presenter: Nicolette Teufel-Shone Co - Presenters: Mae-Gilene Begay, Samantha Sabo, Heather Dreifuss, Kerstin Reinschmidt
Abstract:
In the 1960s, Indigenous communities in the US identified the need and lobbied for community health paraprofessionals to improve cross-cultural communication between Native communities and predominantly non-Native health care providers.  The federally funded Community Health Representative (CHR) Program emerged and today, CHRs provide services in most of the 556 federally recognized tribes and many Indian urban centers. CHRs share the language, socioeconomic status and life experiences of community members. They are trained to perform a wide range of tasks, e.g., home-based health assessments and culturally relevant health education. Evaluation of CHRs has focused on patient contact and services. Although their role as health advocates is clearly outlined by Indian Health Service (IHS), which serves as the umbrella organization for CHR programs nationally, their role as community leaders and change agents supporting healthy behaviors and building community resilience is less well documented.  Talking sessions with CHRs in Arizona reveal that they organize community health promotion events, provide presentations in schools, senior centers and worksites, and coordinate emergency and disaster responses. To recognize and foster this local strength, CHRs experiences and community-based strategies should be documented, shared and integrated into the standard training programs to enhance community resilience.

Abstract #252
Resilience or Resistance? Learning From the Experiences of Indigenous Women in Peru 
Presenter: Eliana Suarez
Abstract:
The intricate relationship between resistance and resilience is far from being understood but this paper endorses views that place resistance as a catalyst for survival and perhaps the foundation of long term resilience. Drawing upon extensive research utilizing sequential mixed methods and field work with grass-root associations of Indigenous Quechua women in Ayacucho, we examine how this group of women utilizes memories of their resistance during the Peruvian armed conflict in order to cope with their current everyday struggles and to re-affirm their new spaces of resistance in post-conflict. In particular, these stories shift the emphasis from women’s suffering during conflicts to their resistance and courage. From these narratives, we conclude that when analyzed conceptually resilience and resistance are separate units but when they are expressed as living experiences their boundaries are less defined and more fluid.

Presenters
BI

Bernadette Iahtail

She is a registered Social Worker and co-founder and Executive Director of Creating Hope Society, a society founded for the survivors of the “The Sixties and Seventies Scoop of Aboriginal Children in Care“. Her key passions are to create awareness of Aboriginal history, specifically to inform Canadians of the ongoing ripple effects of Residential Schools and the 60s and 70s child welfare scoop. She has presented workshops in British... Read More →
ES

Eliana Suarez

Dr. Eliana Suarez, is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University since 2011. She has an MSW and a PhD in Social Work from the University of Toronto. She has extensive experience in community mental health, specifically the nexus of trauma, resilience, and mental health. Her research examines social perceptions of violence, the health consequences of such violence and the tools survivors of violence use to... Read More →
NT

Nicolette Teufel-Shone

Dr. Teufel-Shone’s research interests are in the effectiveness of strength based approaches to health promotion. For more than 25 years, she has collaborated with tribal communities in the US. These tribe-university partnerships have developed and shared culturally relevant health programs that strive to build community resilience. These efforts contribute to public health’s understanding of effective community-based participatory research... Read More →

Co-Presenters
MB

Mae-Gilene Begay

Director at Navajo Nation, CHR Program | Mae-Gilene Begay, MS is Din’e (Navajo), her maternal clan is Salt and paternal clan is Bitterwater. She manages Navajo Nation Tribal programs that provide community outreach and health education. She conducts program/policy planning and development and ensures conformity to tribal policies. She collaborates with tribal and non-tribal resources to enhance and expand service delivery. Ms. Begay holds... Read More →
HD

Heather Dreifuss

Coordinator at College of Public Health, University of Arizona | Ms. Dreifuss coordinates a research education and practicum experience for Native students. She is a skilled instructor and has collaborated on curriculum development with Din’e College, the Navajo Nation Tribal College. More recently, she has coordinat
avatar for Kerstin Reinschmidt

Kerstin Reinschmidt

Assistant Professor, University or Arizona
Assistant Professor at College of Public Health, University of Arizona Dr. Reinschmidt specializes in culturally relevant health promotion, predominantly using participatory and qualitative methods. She has been developing, adapting, implementing and evaluating public health promotion and prevention programs.
SS

Samantha Sabo

Assistant Professor at College of Public Health, University fo Arizona | Dr. Sabo’s research interests are in the social and political context of family health among Mexican immigrant and Indigenous peoples. Her work has been dedicated to the use of mixed, quantitative and qualitative methods to understand the social and structural determinants of health of Latinos of the US-Mexico borderlands and tribal nations. She is an emerging expert... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Mothers - Angela Veale, Sarah Robinson, Jane March-McDonald
Mothers:

Abstract #67
War-Affected Young Mothers In Sierra Leone, Liberia And Northern Uganda: A Mixed-Method Exploration Of Resilience
Presenter: Angela Veale Co - Presenters: Miranda Worthen, Susan McKay
Abstract:
The United Nations Study on Women, Peace and Security (UN 2002) identified one of the major impacts of armed conflict on young women and communities is the increase in children born of forced pregnancy. Children born to girls and young women associated with armed forces or armed groups (CAAFAG) are frequently referred to as ‘rebel babies’ and can experience significant stigma on return to civilian communities.  In addition, children born from exploitative and unrecognized relationships such as through sexual violence, prostitution or transactional sex are also likely to experience marginalisation and isolation.  We present a participatory action research project which sought to promote community participation with a focus on girl mothers formerly associated with armed groups and their children and other vulnerable young mothers in their communities. The study involved a partnership between ten community-based non-governmental organization partners working at grass-roots levels with war-affected communities in the three countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia and northern Uganda and national and international academics. Participants were 658 war-affected young mothers who collectively had over 1000 children. The presentation utilises a mixed-methods approach to examine predictors of child resilience based on a participatory survey with young mother participants, supported by ethnographic analysis.   A key finding was ‘resilience’ as a concept has to capture the inter-relatedness of change, whereby changes in one domain of life (community admiration, livelihoods, wellbeing, capacity to support) stimulated transformations in family relationships, reciprocal support, mutual respect and community networks.

Abstract #93
The Missing M In Mother And Baby Residential Interventions, A Grounded Theory Exploration Of Young Mothers Experience Of Transition From A Parental Baby Residential Unit For Families In Crisis
Presenter: Sarah Robinson Co - Presenters: Angela Veale
Abstract:
Transition from and between different mandated services has been identified as a confusing time (Ikeda, Hubley, Liebenberg & Participants of the Places to Resilience Project, 2013).  This paper seeks to explore the lived experience of transition from a residential parental baby unit for young mothers, initially recognized by mandated services in Ireland (Mental Health, Family and Child Services, Judicial etc.) as at risk of separation from their baby, due to child protection concerns.  This risk, however, is generally transformed during the 3-9 month residential intervention, with improvements in parenting reflective capacity, maternal mental health and mother-baby wellbeing observed.  The majority of mother-baby dyads generally transition together, as child protection concerns are abated.  Risks from some mothers remain, and these mothers transition alone without their baby. Through participatory research, both types of mothers participated in group discussions and creative methodologies (Veale, 2005) to explore the meaning of this transition and what factors help them sustain resilient outcomes achieved while in residence at the unit. Grounded theory analysis (Charmaz, 2006) supports the construction of actionable knowledge that will be of use to service-providers and practitioners seeking to understand protective processes in transition from such services and what factors sustain resilient outcomes.

Abstract #222
Somali Mothering In Exile: Cultural Notions of Risk, Protection and Resilience
Presenter: Jane March-McDonald 
Abstract:
This presentation is based upon a qualitative exploratory PhD study examining the nature of resilience in the daily lives of a small group of forced migrant Somali mothers living in the UK. The presentation focuses on findings related to Somali mothering and explores how the findings might confirm or challenge widely accepted Western notions of good mothering. 
Insights gained into the mothering role can further our understanding and appreciation of the aspirations, expectations and resilience that Somali mothers have and bring to the mothering role, while also highlighting the tensions and contradictions to be found in managing cultural notions of risk, protection and resilience. Mother’s perceived and experienced outside threat to their role and to their children’s wellbeing, evidences a need to work with families and communities in further exploring and understanding the specific cultural challenges that they may encounter mothering in a Western culture. At the same time the difficulties of working with competing and contradictory notions of protective mothering, that are at odds with western thinking, leaves questions as to how professionals and the wider community may best respond to effectively support these Somali mothers mothering in challenging circumstances.

Presenters
AV

Angela Veale

Dr. at UCC | As a researcher, Dr. Veale aims to contribute in the space between academic knowledge, policy and practice. She is interested in innovative and mixed research methodologies, in particular working with creative research methods. Her research and writing takes a socio-cultural and politically situated understanding of the psychological wellbeing of children & families in Ireland and internationally, often using a participatory... Read More →
avatar for Jane March-McDonald

Jane March-McDonald

Lecturer Public Health/ Programme Lead Specialist Community Public Health Nursing/Researcher, University of southampton
Jane is a nurse, midwife and health visitor and is currently lecturer and programme lead for the Specialist Community Public Health Nursing programme in the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton. Jane's research interests include: the health and wellbeing of marginalized and vulnerable populations, resilience risk and protection and cross-cultural research. Jane’s PhD study explored the nature and role of resilience in forced... Read More →
SR

Sarah Robinson

Sarah Robinson is a first year PHD candidate in the University College Cork (UCC), Republic of Ireland. She is interesed in community and critical psychology, post-conflict and conflict transitions, life transitions and resilience, and humanitarianism. She is a graduate of the higher diploma in Applied Psychology in UCC, where her research used participatory action methods and critical discourse analysis to explore a psychodynamic psychodrama... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SM

Susan McKay

Professor at University of Wyoming | Susan McKay, Ph.D. is a psychologist, nurse and Professor of Women's and International Studies at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyoming, USA. For almost two decades, she has taught and researched issues focused upon women, girls, and armed conflict, women and peacebuilding, and feminist issues in peace psychology. She has published more than 75 books, book chapters, and articles. Recent books include... Read More →
AV

Angela Veale

Dr. at UCC | As a researcher, Dr. Veale aims to contribute in the space between academic knowledge, policy and practice. She is interested in innovative and mixed research methodologies, in particular working with creative research methods. Her research and writing takes a socio-cultural and politically situated understanding of the psychological wellbeing of children & families in Ireland and internationally, often using a participatory... Read More →
MW

Miranda Worthen

Assistant Professor at San Jose state University | Dr. Miranda Worthen is assistant professor in Health Science and Recreation at San Jose State University. has reseahed primarily been in conflict or post-conflict countries. Dr. Worthen has worked extensively in Africa and Asia, as well as in Europe. She was a co-investigator on a multi-year community-based participatory action research study with young war-affected mothers, leading the study... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Programs In Schools - Derek Blincow, Kathy Furlong, Tanya Lereya
Programs in Schools:

Abstract #71
“The Best Of Your Life: What Can Schooldays Do?”
Presenter: Derek Blincow 
Abstract:
For those children who grow up within contexts of constellated disadvantage, one of the most important mechanisms for ensuring better than expected outcomes is through education.  Relocating children from a deprived context to one of privileged education has been used to harness that effect.  
This paper will explore the work of two projects, one in the UK, the other in Detroit, USA where there have been such projects in operation for over 40 years.    In the UK, the Royal National Childrens Foundation (RNCF) funds children to attend private residential schools where the child is subject to a high index of parental difficulty.  Increasingly, some of these children are in state care.  In Detroit, the Horizons project has worked since the late 1960s to fund children from the inner city into one particular private residential school.
The paper will sketch the research as well as the cultural and political background informing these projects, comparing and contrasting outcomes, highlighting successes and continuing dilemmas.  It will explore the prospects for their extension into working even further with the most disadvantaged children.  For these children and their families, what is the benefit, what the cost?

Abstract #80
Discovering Your Possibilities
Presenter: Kathy Furlong Co - Presenter: Farook Sarani
Abstract:
A school-based program involving university mentors designed to increase academic success and resiliency in at-risk high school students was evaluated using an explanatory mixed methods design.  Quantitative data was collected and analyzed and qualitative data was gathered in order to explain and expand the quantitative results. 
The study investigated two research questions. Does the Discovering Your Possibilities (DYP) program increase students’ academic success, as identified by student engagement:  increase in attendance, decrease in lates, improved credit accumulation and increase in grade point average and does it increase the level of resiliency of at-risk youth?  What elements in the program contributed to resiliency (if any) from the perceptions of the students, and from the perceptions of the Student Success Teachers?  The results of this study indicate that the intervention had a positive effect on academic success for those students who participated more fully in the intervention.  While the quantitative data results indicate that there is no relationship between resiliency and the intervention, the qualitative data indicates that the intervention positively affected resiliency.
The DYP program has been implemented in another school board in another city.  This program involves community mentors and data results demonstrate that the program is meeting its objectives.

Abstract #166
The Role of School Connectedness in Understanding Mental Health Outcomes in the Context of Cumulative Risk
Presenter: Tanya Lereya 
Abstract:
Research indicates that children who are exposed to multiple adverse contextual factors are at heightened risk of internalizing and externalizing problems.  However, there is also significant variability in mental health outcomes for those exposed to multiple risks and a range of protective factors accounting for some of this variability have been identified (e.g., parenting, social support and positive peer relationships).  However, there is much yet to explore about how school-based relationships support resilience.  For example, it is unclear whether the role of schools connectedness is the same in primary and secondary schools contexts and it is yet to be established whether it is the child’s personal perception of school connectedness that is important or whether it is the extent to which the school is collectively viewed as having a connected climate.The current study draws on longitudinal data collected from 2 cohorts (5,485 primary school students and 5,981 secondary school students) to carry out multi-level structural equation models that explore the moderating role of school-level and individual-level school connectedness in understanding the impact of cumulative risk on the development of internalizing symptoms and externalizing problems over a two year period.  Implications for the role of the school in buffering children against the impact of adverse events on child mental health will be discussed.

Presenters
DB

Derek Blincow

I am a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist and Fellow of the University of Brighton who has co-authored a book and a number of articles on resilient interventions for children living in constellated disadvantage. I continue to work as a clinician and also in advising the courts and charities in the UK on a range of child care issues as well as in developing services that promote resilient working.
KF

Kathy Furlong

Kathy Furlong is a Superintendent of Education for the London District Catholic School Board in London, Ontario. She has held administrative positions in two other school boards in Ontario. She has developed, implemented, facilitated then evaluated a program to increase resiliency and academic success in in-risk youth in two District School Boards, one Catholic and one Public. She completed her Masters at the University of Windsor, Ontario. Her... Read More →
TL

Tanya Lereya

Dr. Tanya Lereya is a research fellow in the Evidence Based Practice Unit (EBPU) based across University College London and the Anna Freud Centre. She completed her PhD, which focused on the precursors and consequences of bullying involvement, and worked as a research fellow for 2 years at the University of Warwick. Her previous work includes investigating the range of risk factors for psychopathology and the long lasting effects into... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Farook Sarani

Farook Sarani

Teacher, Thames Valley District School Board
Student Success Teacher at Thames Valley District School Board Farook Sarani is the Department Head of History and Lead Student Success Teacher at Montcalm Secondary School in London, Ontario. He has taught in two school boards in Ontario, and in both Elementary and Secondary panels. 


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Vroom Room A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Resilience In Rural SettIngs - Debbie Brennick, Heather Sansom
Resilience in Rural Settings:

Abstract #72
An Asset-based Project to Enhance Community Wellness in a Rural Setting
Presenter: Debbie Brennick Co - Presenters: Claudette Taylor, Willena Nemeth
Abstract:
The “Asset Headquarters” project was an intergenerational community-based initiative in four rural towns in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.  The initiative was grounded on the foundation of developmental assets with a goal to enhance capacity of youth by providing physical and human resources in four local communities. The project was intended to enhance, rather than duplicate, good work already being done in local communities.  Natural asset builders with an interest in capacity building in youth were sought to form intergenerational teams in each of the four communities.  The teams consisted of youth and adults with facilitators familiar with the asset development philosophy.  The teams met weekly and created goals and outcomes they wanted to achieve e.g. community garden, creative art displayed in the community.  Over a period of six months the teams worked toward reaching their goals.  Some teams remain together today and feedback from both adults and youth have been extremely positive.

Abstract #243
Sport For Resilience: Fostering Rural Youth Resilience Through Participation In Non-Therapy Equine-Based Activity
Presenter: Heather Sansom Co - Presenters: Harry Cummings, Leah Levac
Abstract:
Rural communities in Canada are changing. These changes include widening socioeconomic gaps amongst community members, and degraded infrastructure. Normative adversity associated with youth transition to adulthood is magnified in rural areas, where community-level changes are creating ecological conditions that can adversely affect youth. This leads to need for youth programming that is pro-actively inclusive of resilience needs.



Presenters
DB

Debbie Brennick

I am an Assistant Professor teaching in the BScN program at Cape Breton University. Prior to teaching I worked as a registered nurse in critical care nursing and quality management. My research focus relates to asset development and building capacity in youth. I have been involved in many initiatives enhancing the capacity of youth. In addition, as a method to help build capacity in nursing students I have developed a simulation experience for... Read More →
avatar for Heather Sansom

Heather Sansom

PhD Student, University of Guelph
Heather Sansom is a PhD student in Rural Studies at the University of Guelph, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development. Her doctoral work focuses on the intersections between rural wellbeing issues and rural recreation, sport-for-development, animal/nature based experiential learning, and resilience. She will be collecting data on the lived experience of protective factors for resilience among youth participants in positive youth... Read More →

Co-Presenters
HC

Harry Cummings

Harry Cummings, Phd., Professor, University of Guelph and Director Harry Cummings and Associates. Harry has taught evaluation at the University of Guelph for 35 years. He is author of the CES short course on program logic models. He has practised international development and evaluation since 1982 and recently has done evaluation work for UNICEF Indonesia, World Vision Sierra Leone and the Canadian Red Cross. He is a frequent presenter at both... Read More →
LL

Leah Levac

Assistant Professor at University of Guelph | Leah Levac is an Assistant Professor in Community Engaged Scholarship in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph. She has experience leading community-university research collaborations, professional background in nature-based out
WN

Willena Nemeth

Assistant Professor at Cape Breton University | Willena is an Assistant Professor, Nursing at Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia. Her primary area of research is focused on building capacity in individuals specifically nursing students, new graduate nurses. Willena has collaborated on a number of projects related to asset development and building capacity in youth.
CT

Claudette Taylor

Associate Professor at Cape Breton University | Claudette is an Associate Professor teaching in the Nursing program at Cape Breton University, Nova Scotia. Her PhD focused on the influence of cancer on sleep. A secondary area of interest is related to building capacity in youth. Claudette has collaborated on a number of initiatives to build capacity of individuals and communities.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Classroom 3 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Spirituality - Roseline Olumbe, Jim Robertson, Frederick Anyan
Spirituality:

Abstract #92
Faith Communities: Impact on Public Health Provisiom
Presenter: Jim Robertson
Abstract:
Research and practice experience in NE England is illustrating the important role of faith, and faith motivated initiatives in people's health particularly in marginalised and disadvantaged communities. Experience suggests that faith can be a protective factor in health behaviours and outcomes. Faith communities are potentially important settings for public health interventions. Narratives from local people and actors illustrate that cultural and faith assumptions and conventions are intimately linked with understandings of health, around maintaining good health, and dealing with poor health. 
An action oriented research methodology using personal and community resilience concepts is accruing and summarising key evidence and identifying key themes for action by public health agencies and faith communities respectively and together. The process is also providing some important case studies and examples of good practice.  The presentation will encourage discernment re the methodology and some of the key themes. Progress will be reviewed re the evidencing of practical tools and approaches  that are evidence based and enable both faith communities and public health teams to take appropriate action.

Abstract #90
Spirituality as a Foundation of Resilience for Children Living in Low Income Communities
Presenter: Roseline Olumbe
Abstract:
Children within low income communities in Africa are faced with a myriad of challenges that affect their wellbeing. Their challenges include social, emotional, physical, intellectual and spiritual. However, research shows that when these children embrace a spiritual foundation, they are able to forge on with life and make a living regardless of their circumstances. Spirituality has to do with helping children have a relationship with God. This relationship enables children develop a sense of meaning in life making them resilient. Shelly (1982) notes that spiritual needs are meaning of life, purpose of living, giving and receiving love, a sense of forgiveness, hope, creativity, responsibility and self-control. Children who have been enabled to meet these needs are found to be resilient. In a research conducted in Kibera, the major slum in Sub-Sahara Africa, it was noted that spirituality enables children find meaning and purpose in life. Out of 97 child participants, 45.4% claimed that their Christian faith was a source of influence in their lives. It was concluded that spirituality plays a major role in the lives of children enabling them to cope with life challenges. A recommendation was made for parents and other adults to intentionally nurture children’s spirituality.

Abstract #114
The Relationship Between Christian Religious Faith And Practices And Resilience In Person With Essential Hypertension From Ghana
Presenter: Frederick Anyan Co - Presenter: Odin Hjemdal
Abstract:
The objective of this qualitative study was to better understand coping mechanisms of selected essential hypertension patients in Accra, Ghana. Interviews were conducted. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse data from five Christian participants between 45 to 60 years. Results showed that through a process of navigation and negotiation where participants selected from available resources, Christian religious faith and practices were protective resources that was selected to most likely influence positively mental and physical health related outcomes. In this process, the patients accessed social support and resources after activation of beliefs in religious faith and practices. The activation of faith and practices was also associated with increased self-efficacy. Consequently in re-appraisal, this resulted in an efficacy expectation and an avoidance strategy that protected participants from prolonged worry about their condition by deferring their condition to God and waiting for God to resolve the situation which resulted in a positive adaptation. This presentation highlights on the relationship between religion and resilience on one hand and sense of coherence on the other hand. For religious individuals, nurturing religious faith and practices so that it takes a prominent role can be protective and promote processes associated with resilience to inform clinical interventions.

Presenters
FA

Frederick Anyan

Frederick Anyan holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology with Philosophy from University of Ghana. He also holds a Master of Philosophy degree in Human development from Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), where he is currently a PhD candidate in Health and Behavior in a joint PhD program between NTNU and Australian National University (ANU). Frederick’s research interests include psychological resilience, mental... Read More →
JR

Jim Robertson

Background in University Education: research and teaching social work, community Development, Registered Social Worker. Project consultant role with Faith Organisations. Co-director of Community Resilience Project in Disadvantaged communities. Current action oriented research and practice relating to faith contribution in public health provision and services.
RO

Roseline Olumbe

My name is Roseline Olumbe, a Kenyan citizen aged 40 years. I lecture at Daystar University, Kenya in the Child Development and Theology departments. I have researched and presented papers in the field of child D! evelopment both at local and international conferences. I have an interest in the building of resilience in children to enable them cope with life challenges. Currently, I am offering technical support on the spiritual domain to a... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents, and particularly measuring protective factors. Developing research based direct measures of protective factors that captures essential protective resources is... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Trauma and Sexual Abuse - Robbie Gilligan, Frank Infurna, Wassilis Kassis
Trauma & Sexual Abuse:

Abstract #177
Learning from Children Exposed to Sexual Abuse and Sexual Exploitation - Lessons from the Oak Foundation Bamboo Study on Children’s Resilience
Presenter: Robbie Gilligan 
The Bamboo study explored the relevance of resilience insights in less studied contexts, using children’s own accounts of living in conditions of adversity. For the purpose of the study adversity was defined as having been exposed to sexual abuse, or living in communities deemed as high risk for sexual abuse/exploitation. The study took place in three countries, Bulgaria, Ethiopia and Nepal.
The study had certain distinctive features: a focus on the child and young person’s experience and expertise (n=257); local research teams in each country; slightly different target samples in each country, all within the coordinated framework of the study.
The presentation will highlight selected key findings on what the young people found helpful and on the realities of their daily lives as they experienced them. It will also explore some possible implications for programme providers and resilience researchers, in terms of our understanding of the concept of resilience, and how it may play out in the wider context of adversities in the lives of children and young people

Abstract #194
Childhood Trauma Influences Daily Health-Promoting Behaviors: Personal and Social Resources Promote Resilience
Presenter: Frank Infurna Co - Presenters: Megan Petrov, Alex Zautra
Abstract:
Childhood trauma in the form of emotional, physical, or sexual abuse is associated with premature health declines in adulthood. Possible pathways that are conceptually understood to underlie this relationship, but less studied, are biological programming, behavioral tendencies, and social-emotion regulation. Using data from a 30-day daily diary of middle-aged community residents who participated in a study of resilience (n=191, Mage=54, SD=7.50, 54% women), our objective was to target the behavioral tendency pathway by examining whether (1)childhood trauma is associated with sleep quality and daily physical activity, and (2)personal (mastery and optimism) and social (family support and strain) resources moderated these associations. Results revealed that childhood trauma was associated with a decreased likelihood of daily physical activity in midlife; optimism increased the likelihood of daily physical activity for those who reported high levels of childhood trauma. Childhood trauma was associated with poorer sleep quality; this relationship was attenuated by positive family relationships in midlife. Our results suggest that childhood trauma leads to poorer health in midlife through reductions in health-promoting behaviors. However, personal and social resources provide avenues for resilience that increase engagement in health-promoting behaviors. Our discussion focuses on how our findings inform resilience-promoting interventions to help mitigate the detrimental health effects of childhood trauma.

Abstract #205
First and Second Level Resilience: The Differential Impact of Family Violence on Adolescents
Presenter: Wassilis Kassis Co - Presenter: Sibylle Artz
Abstract:
Our central question was: Is a positive resilience status (being non-violent/non-depressive despite experiencing family violence) a sufficient indicator for positive social and personal development? To answer this question we computed participants’ average protective and risk factors scores and used variance analyses to compare the means of the specific protective and risk factors of resilient adolescents who had experienced family violence with those who had not.  We found that a positive resilience status is not sufficient for positive social and personal development. Resilient students who had been exposed to family violence showed significantly higher levels of social and personal risks and lower levels of social and personal protective characteristics than students without family violence experiences. These findings indicate that despite a positive resilience status, the higher the experienced level of violence family, the higher the risk characteristics and the lower the protective characteristics, even for resilient students, such that high levels of family violence “wash out” young people’s chances of positive development.


Presenters
FI

Frank Infurna

Dr. Frank J. Infurna is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. His research broadly focuses on examining resilience in adulthood and old age with an emphasis on examining mechanisms linking early life adversity to health in adulthood and old age and personal and social resources that promote resilience to early life adversity, as well as examining whether and how individuals are resilient when confronted with major life... Read More →
avatar for Robbie Gilligan

Robbie Gilligan

Robbie is Professor of Social Work and Social Policy, at Trinity College Dublin where he is also Associate Director (and co-founder) of the Children's Research Centre. He is also an (honorary) Research Fellow at SFI – The Danish National Centre for Social Research, Copenhagen, and Extraordinary Professor at Optentia Research Programme, North West University, South Africa. He was an adviser to the Oak Foundation Bamboo Resilience Research... Read More →
WK

Wassilis Kassis

Wassilis Kassis, PhD, holds a Full Professorial Chair for Educational Science at the University Osnabrück/Germany. For more than 20 years, Kassis develops and coordinates projects of research on the social development of young adults within the context of family and school at national and international level. His main focus of research and teaching is dedicated to the particular resilience processes of adolescents with special attention to... Read More →

Co-Presenters
MP

Megan Petrov

Assistant Professor of Nursing at Arizona State University | Dr. Megan Petrov is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Arizona State University. Her research broadly focuses on sleep, sleep disorders, health disparities, and pain and personal and social resources that promote resilience in adulthood and old age.
AZ

Alex Zautra

Foundation Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University | Dr. Alex Zautra is a Foundation Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University. His research broadly focuses on emotions, stress, and health and promoting resilience in adulthood and old age. His research also focuses on developing interventions for promoting resilience for high-risk groups.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Youth Headed Households - Mary Joyce Kapesa, Zoleka Soji, Kelly Schwartz
Youth Headed Households:

Abstract #203
Cultural Manifestations of Resilience in Child Headed Households in Mutasa District, Zimbabwe
Presenter: Mary Joyce Kapesa
Abstract:
According to UNICEF and UNAIDS (2006) Zimbabwe had 50 000 child headed households (CHH) in 2002.  By 2010, the figure had gone up to more than 100 000, making Zimbabwe the African country with the highest number of CHH (UNICEF, 2010). These statistics gave rise to the sprouting of many organisations and programmes aimed at catering for the needs of the affected children. Not much attention is given to what the CHH can do for themselves and how they have been surviving without outside help. A qualitative study was undertaken to explore the experiences of children living in CHH and the factors that make them resilient.  A total of 28 children in ten CHH from Mutasa and Mutare urban districts participated in the study. Focus group discussions and qualitative interviews were used to collecte from 46 community members, 24 teachers and, 25 child service professionals.   The data was thematically analysed.The research findings indicate bi- directional influences of the CHH’s personal characteristics and an enabling environment that allowed the children to act on their strengths in a way that produced desired outcomes. The meaning of resilience was also explored from the perspective of the CHH and community leaders and members.

 Abstract #251
Resilience in Youth-Headed Households: Strengthening Networks of Support as Protective Factors
Presenter: Zoleka Soji Co - Presenter: Blanche Pretorius
Abstract:
The study seeks to explore and describe the protective factors within youth-headed families and community context that promote the resilience of youth-headed households.  
The study is based on the narrative life stories of six youth-headed families in Port Elizabeth, who were able to remain together as a family following the death of parents as well as perceptions of community members regarding the availability of protective factors within the community that promote resilience of these households. Data collection was conducted utilising multiple methods, such as one-on-one individual interviews with young people heading their households, family focus group interviews as well as both qualitative and quantitative methods to generate data regarding community protective factors and processes. 
The findings illustrate the following factors within the family and the community as playing a role in the enhancement of resilience of members of youth-headed households: availability of circles of care and social networks for the individual and the family as a whole within the community, strong family and social relationships within the family, religious and cultural affiliations and practices, availability of communication and problem solving skills at family levels, as well as, an ability to create hope. The findings also identified the need to build and strengthen communities through assert-based and community development approaches as part of efforts geared towards promoting resilience in youth-headed households.

Abstract #246
 For Crying Out Loud: Seeking and Finding Developmental Assets in Rural South African Township Youth 
Presenter: Kelly Schwartz
Abstract:
Contrary to a deficit-based approach, positive youth development (PYD) explores how personal and social environments can be studied to promote adaptive functioning (Damon, 2004; Lerner, 2004). Operationalizing this PYD framework, Zulu youth (N=511; M=16.3 years) from three rural township high schools completed the Developmental Assets Profile (DAP; Search Institute, 2005) that measured external (e.g., empowerment, support) and internal (e.g., positive values, social competency) assets. Risk and thriving behaviours were measured using the Orphans and Vulnerable Children Baseline Survey (Scope and Family Health International, 2002).  
Although almost one in five reported (17%) assets in the “low” range (e.g., constructive use of time), many youth reported developmental assets in the “good” and “fair” ranges (e.g., learning, boundaries and expectations). Multiple regression analysis revealed that specific internal and external assets accounted for significant variance in school success (R = .31), health behaviour (R = .29), community engagement (R = .32), and risk behaviour (R = .38); neither asset category significantly predicted access to food/medicine or reduced violence victimization.  Amidst a cultural context of significant risk, Zulu youth reported developmental assets that predicted thriving and risk outcomes.  Discussion will connect the presence and power of developmental strengths to local Zulu youth leadership programs.

Presenters
KS

Kelly Schwartz

University of Calgary
Dr at University of Calgary | Dr. Kelly Dean Schwartz is Associate Professor in the School and Applied Child Psychology program and Director, U of C Applied Psychological and Educational Services (UCAPES), an on-campus clinic serving children and families Calgary and area. He has a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and an MSc in Educational Psychology from the University of Calgary. His research and teaching interests include the psychosocial factors... Read More →
MJ

Mary Joyce Kapesa

I am a Psychology lecturer at Africa University, currently studying for my my PhD in Psychology at UNISA. I am a registered psychologist. I am a Fullbright Scholar and was awarded the staff development award in 2009/2010. I attended Purdue University as a Fullbright scholar during that time.
ZS

Zoleka Soji

Dr Zoleka Soji is a senior lecturer in the Department of Social Development Professions (Social Work) at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa. She has been in the academic field for the past 10 years. Her field of teaching and research is in the area of youth development and qualitative research. She also coordinates social work students’ work integrated learning.

Co-Presenters
BP

Blanche Pretorius

Dr. at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University | Dr Blanche Pretorius is the Director of the Research Capacity Development unit at the Nelson Mandela metropolitan University. She is also involved in student research in her role as a promoter and supervisor. She has successfully accompanied post graduate students in completing masters and doctoral studies.


Wednesday June 17, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

3:15pm

Break
Take a break to prepare for an amazing Keynote speech yet to come!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:15pm - 3:30pm
King's College King's College

3:35pm

Keynote by Dr. Cindy Blackstock "12 Million Reasons: Taking Action to Support First Nations Children Today"
12 Million Reasons: Taking Action to Support First Nations Children Today
Speaker: Cindy Blackstock
Supreme Court Justice Frankfurter said "there is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals." Individual resilience must be built on a foundation of equal opportunity and a profound respect for diversity. In 2007, the Caring Society along with the Assembly of First Nations filed a human rights complaint alleging Canada’s provision of First Nations child and family services is discriminatory. It would take six years before the matter came to a full and public hearing. This historic child rights case will establish one of the most important legal precedents for children’s law in Canada and ensure First Nations families have an equal opportunity to safely care for their children. Between 2007 when the case was filed and 2012, First Nations children have spent over 12 million nights in foster care.

Keynotes
avatar for Cindy Blackstock

Cindy Blackstock

A member of the Gitksan Nation, Cindy Blackstock has worked in the field of child and family services for over 20 years. An author of over 60 publications, her key interests include exploring, and addressing, the causes of disadvantage for Aboriginal children and families by promoting equitable and culturally based interventions. Current professional interests include acting as an Expert Advisor to UNICEF on the UN Declaration on the Rights of... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 3:35pm - 5:00pm
Alumni Hall/KTS NAB 1st/2nd Floor, King's College

5:00pm

The President's Reception: Meet and Greet
Enjoy a light dinner and meet and greet. This is a great chance to discuss the presentations and speeches given today during the conference!


Wednesday June 17, 2015 5:00pm - 6:00pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

7:00pm

Community Presentation: Dr. Ann Masten - Understanding and Promoting Resilience in Children and Adolescents
The Resilience Research Centre, Halifax Regional School Board & Strongest Families Institute would like to invite you to a FREE talk with Dr. Ann Masten.

Join this world renowned expert in resilience and child development for a special community presentation for parents, caregivers, and educators.

Ordinary Magic

Why do some kids thrive and adapt despite challenging circumstances? How do they overcome poverty, chronic family problems, or exposure to trauma and still find pathways to success? Dr. Masten’s presentation will leave you with a clear understanding of what you can do to promote resilience in the young people you live and work with, and empower them to overcome adversity in their lives.

Keynotes
avatar for Ann Masten

Ann Masten

I study competence, risk, and resilience in development, with a focus on the processes leading to positive adaptation and outcomes in young people whose lives are threatened by adversity. This work aims to build a better science for promoting positive adaptation and preventing problems in human development. I direct the Project Competence Studies of Risk and Resilience, including the Project Competence Longitudinal Study, which has followed a... Read More →



Wednesday June 17, 2015 7:00pm - 9:30pm
Spatz Theatre Citadel High School
 
Thursday, June 18
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Delight in a scrumptious breakfast before another day of invigorating paper presentations held all over campus!


Thursday June 18, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
McInnes Room Student Union Building, Dalhousie University

8:00am

Conference Registration
Come early and be ready for another day of great lectures!


Thursday June 18, 2015 8:00am - 12:30pm
McInnes Room Student Union Building, Dalhousie University

8:30am

Keynote by Dr. Ann Masten "Resilience in Human Development: Interdependent Adaptive Systems in Theory and Action"
Resilience in Human Development: Interdependent Adaptive Systems in Theory and Action
Speaker: Ann Masten
In her keynote lecture, Professor Masten will discuss contemporary concepts of resilience from the perspective of relational developmental systems theory. The capacity of individuals to manifest positive adaptation in the context of serious challenges will be examined in relation to theory and evidence about the interaction of multiple systems across levels of function, from epigenetic to social processes. Individual resilience will be considered in concert with family, community, and other aspects of ecological resilience. Implications for practice of a dynamic systems view of resilience will be discussed in light of multiple levels of human interaction and the goal of building resilience and improving the odds of recovery from major disturbances that can threaten human potential and development.

Keynotes
avatar for Ann Masten

Ann Masten

I study competence, risk, and resilience in development, with a focus on the processes leading to positive adaptation and outcomes in young people whose lives are threatened by adversity. This work aims to build a better science for promoting positive adaptation and preventing problems in human development. I direct the Project Competence Studies of Risk and Resilience, including the Project Competence Longitudinal Study, which has followed a... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
McInnes Room Student Union Building, Dalhousie University

10:30am

Break
Reflect on the keynote lecture and prepare for another interesting topic, our very own Resilience Research Center!


Thursday June 18, 2015 10:30am - 11:00am
McInnes Room Student Union Building, Dalhousie University

11:00am

Plenary by Dr. Michael Ungar and Dr. Linda Liebenberg "The Resilience Research Centre: A Report on Findings and their Application to Practice"
The Resilience Research Centre: A Report on Findings and their Application to Practice
Speakers: Michael Ungar, Linda Liebenberg
The Pathways to Resilience Research Project examines service use patterns, personal and ecological risk factors, and aspects of resilience of youth across different cultures, contexts, and with complex service histories. This mixed methods study is taking place in Canada, China, Colombia, New Zealand, and South Africa. In all five countries, we partner with communities and service providers to identify: 1) The culturally specific aspects of resilience that young people use to cope with problems; 2) The psychological, social, and environmental risks that young people face; and 3) Young people’s service use patterns, i.e. their use of services like Child Welfare, Corrections, Mental Health, and Special Educational Services, their use of informal supports from their family and communities, and their use of informal services provided by communities and local not-for-profit organizations. This presentation will review findings from the qualitative and quantitative data, discussing the implications for service provision.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda is a methodologist, whose research examines the use of both image-based methods and mixed method research designs. She also considers how these facilitate an understanding of young people in marginalised contexts, as well as how these data inform instrument development. She has published and presented internationally on resilience related themes relevant to the understanding of youth across cultures and contexts. Her publications include... Read More →
avatar for Michael Ungar

Michael Ungar

Dr. Michael Ungar wears many professional hats. He is equally well known as the author of books for parents and caregivers as he is for his world-renowned research on the topic of resilience. As a writer he has adapted ideas from his research and clinical practice into best selling works like Too Safe For Their Own Good: How Risk and Responsibility Help Teens Thrive, and his most recent release, I Still Love You: Nine Things... Read More →

Thursday June 18, 2015 11:00am - 12:15pm
McInnes Room Student Union Building, Dalhousie University

12:15pm

Lunch Break
Look over your schedule and grab a bite to eat before diving into some fascinating papers!

What's for lunch?
Open Face Turkey Sandwhiches
Gravy Mashed Potatoes, Vegetables
Orange Peel Beef with Brown Rice
7 Vegetable Bean Stew 


Thursday June 18, 2015 12:15pm - 1:45pm
King's College King's College

1:45pm

Concurrent Paper Presentations
Listen to presentations by expers such as Fiona Thomas, Wassilis Kassis and Wanda Taylor on topics such as Children and War, Schools and Resilience, and Stories of Resilience.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
King's College King's College

1:45pm

Art Therapy & Resilience - Eugenia Canas, Emily Gagnon, Robin S. Cox
Art Therapy & Resilience:

Abstract #81
Visual Arts Practice for Resilience Building with Young People: Methods, Findings and Outcomes
Presenter: Emily Gagnon Co - Presenters: Lisa Buttery, Hannah Macpherson
Abstract:
This project involved delivery of a program of weekly resilience-building arts workshops for young people with complex needs. It also included a literature review, project film and co-creation of a practice guide by academics, practitioners and young people. The review found a significant existing evidence-base linking visual arts practice to individual and community resilience across a number of disciplinary fields including art therapy, social work, community health and cultural policy. The research element used a collaborative mixed-methods approach to investigate resilience outcomes for 5 young people with learning disabilities and 4 young people with experience of mental health issues. Researchers found that even short-term visual arts interventions can have a significant positive impact on young people’s resilience. In this session an academic, community worker and young person with experience of mental health issues will reflect on the findings of the project as well as discussing some of the benefits and tensions involved in co-creation of collaborative project outputs. In addition, through drawing on her own experiences one of the young people involved with the project will trace some of the longer term, hard to measure –qualitative outcomes of participation in the project and BoingBoing Resilience Community.

Abstract #161
Voices Against Violence: Engaging Youth in Arts-Based, Participatory Research to Examine Impacts on Health and Wellbeing
Presenter: Eugenia Canas Co - Presenters: Marnina Gonick, Michelle Brake
Abstract:
This presentation describes a national arts-based initiative developed and implemented in collaboration with diverse populations of youth in Canada. Presenters will share emerging findings from the first three years of this CIHR-funded project, which examines structural violence and its impacts upon the health and wellbeing of Canadians ages 14 to 24. Using participatory approaches, a diverse team of academic and community researchers and leaders ─ alongside youth and policymakers ─ have engaged over 25 groups of young people in art-based discussions of how youth experience marginalization through societal structures and policies. Marnina Gonick, Canada Research Chair in Gender at Mount St Vincent University, will discuss dimensions of this art-based research working with marginalized youth in Halifax and Region. Eugenia Canas, national youth advisory board coordinator for the Voices project, will discuss specific components of this project’s youth-adult partnerships and engagement approach. A member of the National Youth Advisory Board will also be present, sharing youths’ experiences of the project, including reported benefits in consciousness-raising, the building of stronger identities, and an empowered sense of belonging through the ‘collectivizing’ of daily experiences and challenges. Intersections with processes associated with youth resilience will be raised, as will implications for programmers and policymakers.

Abstract #164
Youth Creating Disaster Recovery and Resilience: An Arts Based Action Research Project
Presenter: Robin S. Cox
Abstract:
Youth Creating Disaster Recovery and Resilience (YCDR) is a community-based action research project designed to learn about disaster recovery and resilience from the perspectives of youth. Moreover, YCDR2 focuses on the potential of youth to act as powerful catalysts for change and resilience in their communities. 
Funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the project has worked with youth in Joplin, Missouri following a powerful EF-5 tornado (May 2011); Slave Lake, Alberta, devastated by a wildfire (May 2011), and four communities (Calgary, High River, Morley and Canmore) heavily impacted by the Southern Alberta 2013 floods 
YCDR uses participatory and creative research methodologies (e.g., digital storytelling, photostories, animation) to elicit and explore the perspectives of youth in order to generate evidence-informed, inclusive, and youth-centered approaches to disaster recovery and empower youth to take action to improve the resilience of their communities. 
This presentation will provide an overview of the project and share some of the youth-generated creative outputs (photography, videos, songs, poems, etc.) and research findings. Next steps will be discussed. These include the development of a youth-centred resilience innovation lab involving an international network of youth leaders, researchers, practitioners, and non-governmental organizations.

Presenters
EG

Emily Gagnon

Emily Gagnon is a community fellow at BoingBoing Social enterprise and the University of Brighton and PhD student at the University of Sheffield. She encountered BoingBoingthrough her community work with Art in Mind and went on to work for them during which time she developed an enduring interest for understanding resilience as well as collaborative research. She continues to develop these interests on her PhD where her research focuses on health... Read More →
EC

Eugenia Canas

National Youth Advisory Member at Voices against Violence Project | Michelle Brake is a third-year student at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, doing a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, Geography and Drama. Michelle has been a member of the National Youth Advisory Board in the Voices against Violence project since 2012. She has also been involved with Girl Guides for 13 years; from girl member to being the current National Link... Read More →
RS

Robin S. Cox

Royal Roads University
Robin Cox is a Professor and Program Head of the Disaster and Emergency Management programs at Royal Roads University. Robin has devoted her research program to understanding disaster resilience and the potential for disasters to spark social change and creative innovation. In line with this focus, her current research project, Youth Creating Disaster Recovery and Resilience (YCDR2) engages and empowers disaster-affected youth through... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Michelle Brake

Michelle Brake

Michelle Brake is a fourth-year student at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, doing a Bachelor of Arts in Drama, Geography and Sociology. Michelle has been an Assistant Researcher and the Coordinator of the National Youth Advisory Board in the Voices Against Violence project since 2014. Michelle's research is on the role of youth-led and -oriented organizations that allow young people to be engaged within their communities.
LB

Lisa Buttery

Artist in Residence at Boing Boing Social Enterprise | Lisa Buttery is artist in residence at BoingBoing Social enterprise, Brighton. Lisa is a volunteer and founding member of Art in Mind, a youth-led community arts group for young people with experience of mental health issues. Lisa turned to self-harming at 14 to cope with the tough times she was facing. Increasingly she has replaced self-harm with art as she occupies herself with her... Read More →
MG

Marnina Gonick

Project Co-Principal Investigator; Canada Research Chair in Gender at Mount St Vincent University | Marnina Gonick is Canada Research Chair in Gender at Mount St Vincent University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is the author of Between Femininities: Identity, Ambivalence and the Education of Girls, published by SUNY Press in 2003 and co-author of Young Femininities: Girlhood, Power and Social Change, published by Palgrave in 2004. She has... Read More →
HM

Hannah Macpherson

Dr at University of Brighton Hannah Macpherson is a senior lecturer in the Department of Environment and technology at the University of Brighton. Her research interests include the Geographies of disability and impairment and Geographies of responsibility and citizenship. She has recently published Inclusive Arts Practice and Research with Routledge.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Classroom 3 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Children & War - Fiona Thomas, Julie Schiltz, Friederike Mieth
Children & War:

Abstract #133
Emic Perspectives on the Impact of Armed Conflict on Children’s Mental Health in Northern Sri Lanka and Northwestern Burundi
Presenter: Fiona Thomas
Abstract:
Background: The impact of armed conflict on the mental health of children and youth has been well documented. However, emic perspectives (i.e. locally held insider views) on the mental health consequences of armed conflicts have received less attention. Methods: We collected qualitative data in northern Sri Lanka and northwestern Burundi. In Sri Lanka, there were a total of 50 participants, including children, parents, teachers, traditional and religious healers, health workers, and non-governmental organization staff. In Burundi, there were a total of 185 participants, including children, parents, teachers, and key informants.  Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted in both settings.Results: Using a theoretical framework of ecological resilience, we found multiple examples of resources for children at the family, peer and community levels. Thematic analyses indicated that most mental health problems, including spiritual problems and perceived cultural decline, are addressed within the family, but eclectic care across the formal and informal sectors is sought when symptoms persist or worsen. Conclusions: We conclude that mental health services in both countries could be improved by building on local mental health conceptualizations and available resources. Additionally, variations in emic resources between settings should be addressed prior to the implementation of any intervention.
Authors: Thomas, Fiona; Tol, Wietse; Vallipuram, Anavarathan; Sivayokan, Sambasivamoorthy; Ndayisaba, Aline; Ntamutumba, Prudence; Jordans, Mark; Reis, Ria; de Jong, Joop

Abstract #229
Individual and Social Rresilience in Sierra Leone
Presenter: Friederike Mieth 
Abstract:
Sierra Leone has endured a 10-year long civil war from 1991 to 2002. In the aftermath of the war, much scholarly attention has been paid to the causes and effects of the violence, and to institutional forms of dealing with the past such as the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a war crimes tribunal, and demobilization and reintegration programs. What received less scrutiny so far were the many ways in which Sierra Leoneans demonstrated resilience, both individually and socially. Drawing from ethnographic data collected during 9 months of fieldwork in different locations in the country, I explore these different forms of resilience and discuss a range of possible individual and socio-cultural factors that may have contributed to resilience in post-war Sierra Leone. I argue that more anthropolgoical research on resilience is needed: while some of the promoting factors I discuss are well-researched across cultures in psychology and related disciplines, other factors seem to be specific for the local and even community context and therefore need much deeper ethnographic scrutiny. I close the presentation by discussing some conceptual and methodological challenges of researching resilience as an anthropologist.

Abstract #245
The Social Reintegration of Former Child Soldiers From a Community Perspective 
Presenter: Julie Schiltz
Abstract:
This presentation outlines the findings of a study on how communities in northern Uganda handle relational and social challenges during the reintegration of former child soldiers. Previous research suggest that child soldiering has communal aspects, and that the post-child soldiering reintegration process is a shared effort by all community members. Yet, community perspectives are often neglected in research on child soldiering, impeding the development of resilience communities in a post-conflict setting. 
A total of 249 participants, among whom 49 former child soldiers, participated in a total of 36 group sessions. Participatory techniques enhanced input from all community members and contextual sensitivity of the research. Central themes for all participants during the reintegration of former child soldiers were letting go of fear, getting used to life after child soldiering, resentment & forgiveness and reducing insults. While all participants addressed similar topics, the results also highlight their particular positions and aspirations within this complex reality, and show significant differences between perspectives of former child soldiers and other participants. This study raises important implications for understanding and supporting the post-child soldiering reintegration process from a contextual perspective. Relying on the voices of different community members, this presentation will critically reflect on reintegration efforts for former child soldiers that frequently adopt a pathological and individualized approach.

Presenters
avatar for Fiona Thomas

Fiona Thomas

PhD Candidate, Ryerson University
Fiona Thomas is currently a doctoral candidate in the Clinical Psychology program at Ryerson University. She completed her MSc at the London School of Economics, where her thesis was focused on coping and resilience in urban refugees in Kathmandu, Nepal. She has worked in global health as well as in Ontario with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Her PhD dissertation is aimed at exploring the... Read More →
avatar for Friederike Mieth

Friederike Mieth

Friederike Mieth completed her Ph.D. in Social and Cultural Anthropology at the Philipps University Marburg (Germany) in 2014. In her dissertation, she explores everyday strategies and practices of dealing with the past in post-conflict Sierra Leone. She currently works as a researcher and consultant in the fields of conflict transformation and transitional justice and prepares a research project on resilience in Sierra Leone. She previously... Read More →
JS

Julie Schiltz

Julie is a PhD student at the department of Special Education at Ghent University (Belgium) and is affiliated to the Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations (CCVS) as a researcher. She studied Educational Sciences and Conflict and Development Studies at Ghent University. She carried out an 8-month internship at the psychosocial support centre of CCVS in northern Uganda, where she also conducted research on the social reintegration of... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

CYCC Network: Mobilizing Knowledge to Support Vunerable Youth - Jimmy Bray, David Este, Judi Fairholm, Isabelle Levert Chiasson
CYCC Network: Mobilizing Knowledge to Support Vulnerable Youth:

Abstract #66
Information Seeking Behavior of Young People and Mental Health – Knowledge Synthesis
Presenter: David Este Co - Presenters: Christa Sata, Alicia Raimundo
Abstract:
In 2013 and 2014 the CYCC Network completed a report which synthesized existing knowledge on youth mental health information-seeking in order to shed light on the diverse information seeking experiences of youth and to identify areas of interest which are relevant to improving programming that could help youth find the information they need. 
The existing academic and practice-based literature shows that the factors influencing the mental health experiences of youth are diverse. For some youth, multiple factors such as gender, age, geographic location, ethnic background, and legal status interact to shape experiences of mental health and of help-seeking.  While relevant mental health information exists, the evidence suggests that the mere existence of evidence does not effect changes in the mental health experiences of many youth.
The synthesis report suggests that engaging youth in the creation of spaces and activities that support the development of mental health knowledge may be effective in bridging the gap between the experiences of youth and the production of mental health information. This could include collaboratively creating mental health resources and engaging youth in developing strategies for the productive dissemination of mental health information.

Abstract #159
Ethics in Research With Vulnerable Youth 
Presenter: Jimmy Bray Co - Presenter: Linda Liebenberg
Abstract:
The CYCC Network conducted a knowledge synthesis with the goal of identifying ethical considerations related to research with vulnerable and at-risk children and youth.  The knowledge synthesis suggests that organizations involved in research with youth should develop ethics oversight procedures which take the complexities of the contexts of vulnerable children and youth into account. This synthesis was used to produce peer-reviewed recommendations that can be used to inform the ethical governance of research with children and youth.

Abstract #175
Promising Practices for Violence Prevention to Help Children in Disasters and Complex Emergencies
Presenter: Judi Fairholm Co - Presenter: Emily Pelley
Abstract:
According to a UNHCR report in 2013, there are 51.2 million people who have been displaced worldwide; half of which are children. Children face compounded risk when displaced. In addition to suffering the immediate consequences of the disaster, they are also exposed to the increased risk of violence as well as to a lack of care and protection when they attempt to seek help. Understanding effective violence prevention strategies is critically important in order for child protection to be effective in these challenging contexts. The purpose of this knowledge synthesis is:
-To present the ways in which complex emergencies and disasters expose children and youth to violence, both here in Canada and around the world
-To highlight promising practices that foster resilience in these challenging environments
The recent trend to situate violence in the domain of public health has conceptualized violence as a disease that can be prevented.  Violence can be prevented through collaborative responses from diverse sectors including health, education, social services, and justice. This collective impact response is necessary to address the many forms and impacts of violence on children and youth.

Abstract #334
Creating Supporting Environments for Children and Youth with Complex Needs
Presenter: Isabelle Levert Chiasson Co - Presenters: Lisa Lachance
Abstract: 
An estimated 14-25 percent of Canadian children and youth are living with a mental health disorder, and many of these young people face multiple other challenges that further compromise their physical, mental and emotional well-being. The complex needs of these children and youth make it very difficult to adopt a single intervention approach. Instead, multi-dimensional problems require complex solutions. Comprehensive strategies are needed that bring together many different actors and services from across sectors and disciplines. The Children and Youth in Challenging Contexts (CYCC) Network works to support such strategies by connecting researchers, service providers, practitioners, communities, and youth themselves, and helping them share their knowledge, resources, and lessons learned of what works best for improving the mental health of young people. This presentation will outline the promising practices we’ve learned for supporting young people with complex needs, particularly those living in more vulnerable and marginalized situations. Our aim is to introduce the audience to practical, proven ways that they can create supportive environments for children and youth with complex needs.

Presenters
avatar for James Bray

James Bray

Jimmy Bray is a Project Manager at the CYCC Network at Dalhousie University. He joined the CYCC Network team in December 2013. Jimmy holds an MPhil in Social Anthropology and a BA in Sociology.
avatar for Judi Fairholm

Judi Fairholm

Director: Respect Education, Canadian Red Cross
Judi Fairholm is the Director of the Canadian Red Cross Respect Education: promoting respect, preventing violence. Judi has grown a violence prevention program across Canada; over 7.5 million people have been educated. Since 2000 she has worked on international projects in Turkey, Sri Lanka, India, Guyana, Benin, Chad, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Haiti, Kenya, Australia, Panama, Malaysia, Geneva, and Portugal.

Co-Presenters
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg, PhD., Co-Director Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, is a researcher and evaluator with a core interest in children and youth with complex needs. Her work explores the promotion of positive youth development and mental health, using formal and informal processes of resilience, through both evaluation of service provision and research of youth experiences. As a key component of this work, Linda reflects... Read More →
avatar for Emily Pelley

Emily Pelley

Project Manager, CYCC Network
AR

Alicia Raimundo

CYCC Board Member at CYCC Network | Alicia Raimundo works as the Community Engagement Lead at the Centre for Innovation in Campus Mental Health in Toronto. She holds positions in six mental health organizations including as a board member of the Centre for Children and Youth in Challenging Contexts and as a member of the Centre for Excellence in Children and Youth Mental Health Experts Panel. She has experience working with government... Read More →
CS

Christa Sato

MSW Student, University of Calgary at CYCC Network, University of Calgary | Christa is a MSW student at the University of Calgary and member of the CYCC Network’s youth advisory committee. Christa acted as a co-lead on the CYCC Network’s Information Seeking Behavior of Young People and Mental Health knowledge synthesis report in 2013-2014.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Exposure to Violence -Aldeli Alban Reyna, Kathryn Howell, Laura Miller-Graff
Exposure to Violence:

Abstract #77
Saying Yes: Effective Practices for Sheltering Abused Women with Mental Health and Addiction Issues
Presenter: Aldeli Alban Reyna
Abstract:
Abused women who experience mental health and/or addiction issues face restricted access to shelters and transition houses serving abused women. Historically, shelter staff lacked training and knowledge about mental health and addiction issues, and felt challenged to accommodate them and maintain a safe, comfortable environment for other women and children seeking shelter. This paper reports a research study into innovative practices recently adopted in shelters for abused women to enhance resilience of women presenting with mental health and addiction issues and lower barriers to access. It also explores how these practices can be transferred to shelters for abused women in other communities. Low barrier shelters support women’s resilience through practices and policies that encourage staff to:
• engage in reflective practice, let the client lead;
• work from women’s strengths;
• use a trauma-informed approach;
• say “yes” rather than “no”.
Results from this study will help transfer learning from the best practices collected from resilient shelters to other shelters, and overall help improve access to shelter and support services for abused women with mental health and/or addictions issues.

Abstract #124
 Enhancing Positive Parenting via a Strengths-Based Intervention for Families Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence: The Role of Child Functioning
Presenter: Kathryn Howell
Abstract:
This study examined the effectiveness of an evidence-based intervention in strengthening positive parenting practices among mothers who experienced intimate partner violence. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention (n=58) or waitlist comparison (n=62) condition. Mothers in the intervention participated in the Moms’ Empowerment Program (MEP) while her child participated in the Preschool Kids’ Club (PKC). The MEP builds parenting competence, addresses parenting fears, and strengthens community connections. The PKC improves social skills, enhances coping, builds conflict resolution strategies, and identifies feelings surrounding violence. The intervention utilizes a transactional framework in which enhancing the social and emotional adjustment of mothers is thought to concurrently reduce her child’s adjustment difficulties. Participants were assessed at baseline and post-intervention or waitlist period. The multivariate linear regression model for change in positive parenting was significant (F(7,91)=2.92, p=.008, R2=.19). Women exhibited more change in positive parenting if the family participated in the intervention (β=.20; p=.047).  Additionally, greater change in children’s externalizing problems (β=.37; p=.011) and emotion regulation abilities (β=.28; p=.038) were associated with larger improvements in positive parenting. Findings suggest that rather than focusing solely on problematic functioning, interventions should also target adaptive qualities, including emotion regulation, to enhance parenting abilities in women exposed to violence.

Abstract #230
Examining A Cognitive-Emotional Model Of Resilience In Young Adults Exposed To Violence During Childhood
Presenter: Laura Miller-Graff
Abstract:
Objective:  The primary aims of the current study were to consider accuracy of young adults’ beliefs about the prevalence of violence and to determine how accurate appraisals and emotion regulation are associated with resilient functioning in the context of childhood exposure to violence (CVE).  Method: College students (n=369) drawn from two geographic regions of the United States responded to an online survey assessing CVE, perceptions about the prevalence of violence, emotion regulation skills, mental health, and resilience.  Descriptive statistics and structural equation modeling were used to describe cognitive distortions and the potential protective roles of accurate appraisals and emotion regulation abilities after CVE.  Results: Findings indicated that many college students overestimate the prevalence of violence.  Both cognitive distortions regarding the prevalence of violence and emotion dysregulation were linked to lower levels of resilience.   Conclusion:  Results suggest the importance of including assessments of childhood exposure to violence as a part of standard practice in college counseling centers.  Campus campaigns should be crafted to enhance accurate perceptions about rates of violence while simultaneously providing students with the opportunity to engage in treatment that may facilitate the development of other protective mechanisms, such as emotion regulation. 

Presenters
KH

Kathryn Howell

Kathryn H. Howell, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Memphis. Her research centers on intervention development to enhance resilience among children exposed to potentially traumatic events, such as family violence and interpersonal loss. She examines pathways to risk and resilience in these children and their families. Dr. Howell has published over 35 journal articles and chapters on these... Read More →
LM

Laura Miller-Graff

Dr. Miller’s research examines the developmental effects of exposure to violence in childhood. With a focus on children who have multiple traumatic exposures, she investigates resulting patterns of resilience and psychopathology, including the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Working within an ecological framework, Dr. Miller’s research seeks to understand how various systems (i.e., individual, family, and community) interact... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Vroom Room A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Law & Restorative Justice - Sue Klassen, Susan Reid, Alex Pessoa
Law & Restorative Justice:

Abstract #136
Restorative Justice Following Severe Violence: Affects on Posttraumatic Growth 
Presenter: Sue Klassen
Abstract:
Balancing the well-established field of research on posttraumatic stress and PTSD, which documents the negative sequelae following trauma, posttraumatic growth (PTG) is a growing field that examines the ways some people blossom beyond their pre-trauma baseline through wrestling with trauma.  Some researchers consider PTG a special type of resilience—resilience that transforms—while others say future resilience to traumas may emerge from PTG.  Promising research has shown how a restorative justice process—in which a victim voluntarily meets with the offender following a crime—can reduce victims’ posttraumatic stress and PTSD symptoms.  But what about PTG?  This study of ten victims of crimes of severe violence, who participated in a face-to-face restorative encounter, starts to address this gap.  Themes and quotes from in-depth interviews, combined with measures of PTG using the PTGI-SF scale, will allow these victims/survivors to tell in their own words the role a restorative encounter played in their PTG.  This study will be coupled with an overview of the literature to date, bringing new insights to this growing field.

Abstract #138
Giving Youth in Custody A Voice for Change
Presenter: Susan Reid Co - Presenter: Sarah Gilliss
Abstract:
Youth Matters, a youth led organization sponsored by St. Thomas University has created a chapter within the provincial closed custody facility for young offenders in New Brunswick.  This presentation will focus on the development of this group and the progress that has been made with young people who meet weekly to discuss issues, explore opportunities in a facilitated group that is run by a group of young leaders inside the institution.  The young people have created a video on institutional bullying and have been exploring issues related to violence against women.  This presentation will provide an overview of the adult-youth partnerships that have facilitated the creation and ongoing work with this group of at risk youth.

Abstract #146
Resilience and Vulnerability for Adolescents in Conflict With the Law
Presenter: Alex Pessoa
Abstract:
The research and theoretical frameworks on resilience are mostly coming from the Northern Hemisphere. My proposal is to argue that these studies ignore the particularities of Latin American countries and neglect model of social inequality as the main element for the exposition of young adolescent to indicators of psychosocial risk. I advocate the establishment of collaborative networks in order to create interventional practices and research methodologies that highlight these aspects. In this sense, I believe it is relevant to build a theoretical model to challenge hegemonic notions of resilience that has no applicability in Latin America and do not collaborate in disruption of oppressive social structures historically built under a model which prevails inequality and disenfranchisement of some segments. The universities and researchers interested on resilience theory must join forces to design a consistent epistemological frameworks for the groups belonging to this reality. Furthermore, I understand that the policies and interventional programs should target practices that allow emancipation and the breaking of cycles that perpetuate vulnerability across generations. The audience contributions may allow the beginning of the articulation around this reflective process and may bring implications for the field.

Presenters
avatar for Alex Pessoa

Alex Pessoa

PhD Candidate, UNESP
PhD candidate linked to Faculty of Science and Tecnology, University from Sao Paulo (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil. In the last years the researcher developed studies and interventions in the field of childhood and youth' protection. His papers and book chapters are related to sexual violence against children and adolescents, educative pratices and resilience processess in communities and groups exposed to social vulneralibiliies. In the second... Read More →
avatar for Sue Klassen

Sue Klassen

Self-employed
Sue Klassen, certified Strategies for Trauma Awareness and Resilience (STAR) Practitioner, leads STAR-based trainings throughout Upstate NY and Ontario. She holds a Masters degree in Conflict Transformation, with concentrations in Restorative Justice and Psychosocial Trauma Healing. Past President of Partners in Restorative Initiatives, she has 14 years experience in working with trauma and restorative justice in courts, schools and the... Read More →
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Susan Reid

Professor, St.Thomas University
Dr.Susan Reid is a professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at St. Thomas University who specializes in research on youth justice. Her work focuses on the rights of young persons to have their voice heard in decisions that affect them and her research has been done collaboratively with young people.

Co-Presenters
SG

Sarah Gilliss

Instructor at New Brunswick Community College | Sarah is an instructor in the Social Sciences Department at the New Brunswick Community College. She has been facilitating workshops with young people at the New Brunswick Youth Centre over the past year and has co-authored a textbook on youth justice with Dr. Susan Reid.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Overcoming Stigma through Resilience in LGBTQ Communities - Daniel Elleker, Andre P. Grace, Elizabeth Saewyc
Overcoming Stigma Through Resilience in LGBTQ Communities:

Abstract #82
The Family Resilience Project: Linking Research to Advocating for Gender Minority Youth
Presenter: Andre P. Grace
Abstract:
This paper considers how gender identity is increasingly conceived as a multivariate construction that cannot be contained by the male-female binary. It positions growing into gender as an intricate ecological process impacted by history, social expectations, acculturation, geography, and politics as well as by individual reaction and resistance to any or all of these influences. This revision of what gender can be challenges us to rethink what it means to be gender healthy. This paper examines how we use an emergent resilience typology at the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services in my university to help us navigate comprehensive health dynamics impacting gender nonconforming and trans-spectrum youth. It provides a synopsis of knowledge building about stressors, risk taking, asset building, and indicators of thriving as they relate to this youth population. It uses an ecological framework that surveys complexities impacting how gender minority youth grow into resilience. It considers how our resilience typology innervates purpose and action in our Family Resilience Project, which includes individual and family counselling, a parent/significant adult support group, a trans and gender questioning youth support group, and professional development for workers who focus on meeting the comprehensive health needs of gender minority youth.

Abstract #172
Change in Internalized Homophobia Severity Over Time in Young Gay and Bisexual Men: A Mixed Methods Study of Resilience
Presenter: Daniel Elleker
Abstract:
Background: Internalized homophobia resolution (IHR) has been proposed as a resilience process experienced by many gay and bisexual men, in which high levels of internalized homophobia (IH) decrease over time.
Methods: Six young men were recruited from a small urban area. IH was quantitatively assessed retrospectively relative to three time periods, using the Internalized Homophobia Scale (IHP). An in-depth qualitative interview explored participants’ lived experiences of change in IH across development, and factors perceived to be related to such changes.
Results: Results converged to the extent that all participants experienced declines in IH. Two superordinate themes emerged from qualitative analysis 1) Changes in IH are highly contextual, non-linear, and continuous; and 2) Resilience is experienced as an active and self-directed process. Participants described IH as fluctuating in ways that were contingent on both external and internal events, resulting in small to large changes in IH that were either temporary or enduring.
Conclusions: The construct of IHR is problematic, as it reifies IH as a pathological condition in and of itself, and in so doing abstracts the experience of IH from the sociocultural conditions that produce and maintain it. Qualitative findings point to more nuanced understandings of change in IH over time, which are consistent with a social ecological model of resilience. Implications for research, theory, and program development are discussed.

Abstract #242
Promoting Resilience Among Sexual Minority Adolescents: Buffering Enacted Stigma, Suicide Attempts With Supportive Relationships
Presenter: Elizabeth Saewyc Co - Presenter: Kallista Bell
Abstract:
Sexual minority (gay, lesbian, bisexual) youth face significant health inequities vs. heterosexual peers, including suicide attempts, primarily due to higher rates of victimization and discrimination (enacted stigma). What protective factors in environments and relationships attenuate that link? From the 2008 BC Adolescent Health Survey (N=29,513) we focused on sexual minority students (~5%), conducting multivariate logistic regressions to calculate the predicted probabilities of past year suicide attempt based on varying combinations of key risk factors (physical assault at school, sexual abuse, sexual orientation discrimination) and protective factors (family and school connectedness, perceived safety at school) separately by gender and orientation group. When youth reported all 3 types of violence, and low levels of all 3 protective factors, the probability of suicide attempt was high (males: 75% gay, 63% bisexual; females: 52% lesbian, 72% bisexual). When they reported no violence and high levels of the protective factors, probabilities were much lower (2% to 9%). Even among students with all 3 types of enacted stigma, when they also reported high protective factors, probabilities were sharply lower (e.g., gay boys, 75% to 29%, bisexual girls, 72% to 14%). Supportive relationships appear to reduce the probability of suicidality, even for stigmatized sexual minority youth.

Presenters
avatar for Andre Grace

Andre Grace

University of Alberta
André P. Grace, PhD is Canada Research Chair in Sexual and Gender Minority Studies (Tier 1) and Professor and Director of Research at the Institute for Sexual Minority Studies and Services in the Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Canada. He is co-founder of Camp fYrefly (www.fyrefly.ualberta.ca), a national summer leadership camp for sexual and gender minority youth, and he served as an external reviewer to the Chief Public Health... Read More →
DE

Daniel Elleker

Daniel is currently completing his MSc in Counselling Psychology at the University of Calgary. He is a member of the Western Resilience Network, and completed his research with the Resilience Research Lab at Vancouver Island University in Nanaimo, BC. Daniel is pursuing a research career focused on resilience in sexual and gender-diverse persons and communities, and hopes to become a provisional registered psychologist upon the completion of... Read More →
ES

Elizabeth Saewyc

A Professor of Nursing and Adolescent Medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Dr. Saewyc heads the interdisciplinary Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre. She is a Fellow in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Her research and clinical practice primarily focus on how stigma, violence, and trauma influence young people’s health, coping, and behaviour, and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
KB

Kallista Bell

Graduate Student at Simon Fraser University


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Shatford Room A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Resilience & Education Services - Konrad Glogowski, Zuzana Hrncirikova, Linda Theron
Resilience & Educational Services:

Abstract #179
"A Critical Mass of Supports": Teen Resilience and Educational Attainment through Student Engagement, Wrap-around Programming, and Community Partnerships
Presenter: Konrad Glogowski
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country. The model aligns well with existing research on effective dropout prevention programming and youth engagement. Its four-pillar approach, focused on youth engagement and wrap-around support, has been shown to nurture resilience and improve educational attainment among youth living in risk situations.
This paper presentation will explore how youth engagement - delivered through a comprehensive case management approach and with key community partners - nurtures resilience in marginalized youth. Specifically, the paper will focus on recent case studies from community-based programs in Nova Scotia and Ontario that explore how effective partnerships with local community agencies and schools employ youth engagement strategies, adult-youth mentorships, and a strong focus on youth voice to further enhance the impact of the program, create safe spaces for marginalized youth, and nurture resilience.

Abstract #190
Promotion of Resilience in Education
Presenter: Zuzana Hrncirikova
Abstract:
This paper is a theoretical framework for the search of protective and risk factors in the education of youth who have to cope with greater demands of life circumstances (eg. youth at risk, endangered youth). The text aims to define risk and protective factors of resilience in educational processes in the context of the educational system in the Czech Republic. First the paper deals with the notion of resilience. Then it discusses the contribution of risk and protective factors of resilience, which are specified in terms of social-ecological approach. Eventually it presents particular risk and protective factors in the education of youth in the Czech Republic, which can reinforce or weaken their resilience ability.
The results of empirical studies have shown that education can, under certain circumstances, replace youth what can not be provided by their own family, and can be provided them with a safe environment to live.
As a very important person in this situation seems to be an educator who can help a young person in coping with life's challenges, which are beyond his/her power.

Abstract #255
How Do Education Services Matter for Resilience Processes? South African Youths’ Experiences
Presenter: Linda Theron
Abstract:
The resilience literature is increasingly drawing attention to formal service provision as a means for social ecologies to support children’s and youths’ positive adjustment to challenging life circumstances. This paper interrogates the universality and simplicity of this argument. Using a secondary data analysis of two saturated, qualitative South African data sets (i.e., the life stories of 16 resilient, black South African students from impoverished families, and phenomenological accounts of 237 black South African adolescents) I show that education services predominate South Africans childhood and youth experience of formal support. I theorise that contextual and cultural specifics informed the dominance of education services. However, the data show that education did not consistently facilitate resilience processes. When it did, education services were characterised by teacher-community reciprocity and student receptiveness to support. Moreover, education service providers (i.e., teachers and principals) engaged in supportive actions that went beyond the scope of typical teacher tasks. Thus, I suggest that formal service facilitation of resilience processes is complex and culturally-nuanced. In disadvantaged contexts, like those reported in this paper, it requires collaborative activity that might well demand atypical service acts from service-providers.

Presenters
avatar for Konrad Glogowski

Konrad Glogowski

Director, Research and Knowledge Mobilization, Pathways to Education Canada
As Director of Research and Knowledge Mobilization at Pathways to Education Canada, Konrad Glogowski is responsible for developing and implementing a long-term national research agenda and strategy for the organization, and providing internal research support to better understand educational attainment and youth well-being programs and approaches in Canada and abroad.
avatar for Linda Theron

Linda Theron

Linda Theron, D.Ed. (Educational Psychology), is professor in the Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, South Africa. Her research explores why, and how, some South African youth adjust well to poverty, orphanhood, and/or learning difficulties, and how sociocultural contexts shape these processes of resilience (see www.Lindatheron.org / www.optentia.co.za). She publishes and presents internationally on related themes. In 2013, she... Read More →
ZH

Zuzana Hrncirikova

Assistant Professor
Zuzana Hrncirikova works as an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Education, Palacky University in Olomouc, the Czech Republic. Since 2008, she has been dedicated to the research of resilience. It focuses on issues of resilience and its resources in the educational environment. She is the investigator of several research projects focusing on resilience in education. She publishes in professional periodicals in the Czech Republic.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Boardroom A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Schools & Resilience - Nadine Kuyper, Elena Malaguti, Wassilis Kassis
Schools & Resilience:

Abstract #204
Communities of Practice Supporting Teachers' Resilience? Working With Teachers in a Resilient-Based Systemic Way
Presenter: Wassilis Kassis Co - Presenters: Ulrike Graf, Elias Kourkoutas, Angie Hart
Abstract:
In Osnabrück/Germany with 17, and in Crete/Greece with 45 (pre-)school teachers we created Communities of Practice groups (as two projects within the international Imagine-project coordinated by the University of Brighton, England). These CoPs are shared learning spaces for teachers who work with to students with various and complex needs. Their focus is to strengthen teachers’ resilience. It is hoped that the CoPs will (a) enable all participants to build trusting relationships; (b) support group members to generate new ideas to deal with difficulties. By addressing the school professionals as specialists embedding their new strategies in their practice, we would like to model a resilient way of giving support.
During the CoPs’ one year period, we have administered three times three questionnaires. Starting from Mansfield’s work (2012) we developed a set of questionnaire-questions on teachers’ ability to navigate and negotiate by personal and social resources towards dealing in a resilience oriented way with difficulties at school. Additionally, the teachers completed the burn-out questionnaire by Maslach & Jackson and one inventory exploring the difficulties they face. By combining these three sets of results we identified interesting results on teachers’ personal and social resilience processes over this one year period.

Abstract #210
The Influence of Schooling on the Resilience and Academic Performance of Poverty-Stricken Adolescents in South African Schools
Presenter: Nadine Kuyper
Abstract:
The social and economic environments in which children develop are regarded as important variables which relate to academic performance. In order to support learners in achieving academically, an understanding of the role of these different variables is essential.  The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of additional educational support on the resilient behaviour and subsequent academic performance of adolescents in Grades 9 and 10. A sample of 117 high school adolescents was used. Schools that offer additional educational support tend, on average, to show a healthier teacher-learner relationship, more parental involvement, superior cognitive development and better study orientation. All these factors were also found to contribute to a learner’s potential to demonstrate resilient behaviour. Based on the literature study and the empirical investigation, recommendations to parents, teachers and schools have been made.

Abstract #220
Resilience, Assisted Resilience and Social Inclusion: The Role of School and After School Time Educational Services
Presenter: Elena Malaguti
Abstract:
Introduction:
Both the new international blueprints about the interventions on the juveniles and youths living in vulnerable contexts, the studies about social inclusion, on on the implementation of empowerment, the emergence of new seminal paradigms (resilience, advocacy, assisted resilience) require an inquiry into the perspectives underpinning the construction of inclusive educational contexts, as well as of assisted resilience, in the promotion of resilience processes.
Our research project inquired into the role the adults involved (teachers, social workers, social cares and school managers) have been playing in the management of educational projects concerning groups of youth between 11 and 17 years of age who live under vulnerable conditions and attend either school or the extraschool afternoon educational groups.  
Objectives:
The focus of of our research were the resilience processes among a group of juveniles living under vulnerable conditions (foster children, children with learning difficulties, socio-economic marginality, handicap). Moreover, the project carried out an analysis of the assisted resilience process undertaken by social cares, teachers and managers. Finally, we inquired into the inclusion within the school and extra-school context adolescent hang out with. 
Method:
A theoretical method, relying on a multidimeninsional, multifactorial and ecological approach, was adopted to expose both the educational and the resilience processes. For this purpose, we adopted both qualitative and quantitative analytical tools.



Presenters
avatar for Elena Malaguti

Elena Malaguti

Associated Professor, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna
Elena Malaguti PhD, Pedagogist, Psycologyst and Psicotherapist. | She is Professor of Didactic and Special Education - School of Psicology and Education - Department of Education - Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna. | The main research activities concern the perspective of inclusive education in a social, human and ecological model integrated with the resilience processes through a multifactorial, multidimensional and cultural... Read More →
avatar for Nadine Kuyper

Nadine Kuyper

Educational Psychologist
Nadine is an Educational Psychologist in South Africa. She divides her time between her private practice and Epworth Children’s Home, an NGO Child and Youth Care Centre offering residential and therapeutic care for neglected/abused children. Epworth Children’s Village is also a community resource centre that offers community outreach, service delivery to schools, support and mentorship to other smaller organisations, assessment and therapy... Read More →
WK

Wassilis Kassis

Wassilis Kassis, PhD, holds a Full Professorial Chair for Educational Science at the University Osnabrück/Germany. For more than 20 years, Kassis develops and coordinates projects of research on the social development of young adults within the context of family and school at national and international level. His main focus of research and teaching is dedicated to the particular resilience processes of adolescents with special attention to... Read More →

Co-Presenters
UG

Ulrike Graf

Ulrike Graf, PhD, is a Full Professor of Education at Primary School Age (University of Osnabrück/Germany) and Head of the Research Center in Primary School Education at the Institute for Early Childhood Education and Development of Lower Saxony.She works on pedagogy diagnosis, emphasizing ressource-orientation, sensitivity of relationship and is implementing the concept of happiness as part of the curriculum of teacher training in order... Read More →
EK

Elias Kourkoutas

Prof. Dr. at University of Crete | Elias E. Kourkoutas is currently Professor of Psychology and Special Education and Chairman of the Educational Psychology Division, as well as of the European funded Practicum Program in Special Education in the Department of Primary Education at the Univ


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Seminar 7 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Spaces and Places: Visual Methods and Civic Engagement - Daphne Hutt-MacLeod, Mallery Denny, Linda Liebenberg
Spaces & Places: Visual Methods and Civic Engagement:

Abstract #212
Community-Based Research for Community-Based Services: The Interface of Reflective Participatory Visual Methods and Holistic Approaches to Community Mental Health Programs 
Presenter: Linda Liebenberg Co - Presenter: Daphne Hutt-MacLeod
Abstract:
The Spaces and Places Research Project (S&P) explores the ways in which communities can build better civic and cultural engagement with youth. The purpose is to 1) conceptualize spaces available to youth facing heightened risks that establish a sense of community and cultural connection, and 2) understand how these spaces facilitate the cultural and civic engagement of these youth, in turn fostering resilience. This participatory study involves youth in data analysis and arts-based dissemination projects designed to return findings back to local and broader communities. The study has taken place in two remote communities of Labrador and one rural community of Nova Scotia; all Aboriginal communities. Eskasoni Mental Health Services (EMHS) is a holistic community-based service, supporting the mental health of community members through formal and informal service provision. The organisation consists of 5 sectors (Clinical and Therapeutic Support, Residential School Support, Youth Center, Crisis and Referral Center, and Community-Based Case Management), operated by 19 staff. EMHS is one of three mental health service providers partnering on S&P. This presentation will review the design of S&P, provide an explanation of Eskasoni as the research context, an explanation of the research approach and the study’s relevance to community-based service providers.

Abstract # 168
Engaging Youth in Research: Lessons From Youth Participants
Presenter: Mallery Denny Co - Presenters: Jenny Reich, Hannah Battiste, Diome Denny, Angelo Bernard, Hugh Paul, Raylene Nicholas, Ivan Knockwood, Kevin Christmas, Ronald Dennis
Abstract:
 "The hand-drum is the beat of the soul; the eagle is the guide through our path; we unite as a team of speakers, as we mumble but never stumble. We are our people." These words are included in a mural on a community wall in Eskasoni, Canada. The mural shows what we have learned through the Spaces and Places Research Project (S&P) about what young people like us, in OU.R. Eskasoni, need to do well. We use the mural to share this knowledge with our community -- the people who support us to do better. In this presentation we will share with people outside of our community what young people in rural communities, and elsewhere, need to do well. We will also share with researchers what they need to know to do better research with young people like us. We will tell them what we enjoyed and found useful about participating in research; and what we didn't enjoy, what should have been different. We'll let them know what was hard, but what motivated us to stick it out, and care about the research project and how it could help us, and the young people who come after us.

Abstract #165
Meaningfully Engaging Youth in Research and Evaluation
Presenter: Daphne Hutt-MacLeod
Abstract:
This facilitated discussion will present core lessons gained from experiences of youth participants and researchers engaged in several research projects internationally. Specifically, we will present key points to elicit discussion around the following three questions: 1. Why should we engage youth meaningfully in research and evaluation? 2. How do we engage youth meaningfully in research/evaluation and dissemination of findings?3. How are community partners (including youth participants) working with researchers to protect the best interests of youth in the research/evaluation process?The focus will be on research and evaluation with youth living in challenging socioeconomically marginalised contexts. The goal of Understanding meaningful engagement is to facilitate connection and knowledge sharing between a diverse group of actors engaged in research (i.e. researchers, community-partners, and youth research participants); and to generate new knowledge about how to meaningfully engage youth in research and evaluation so as to reverse the flow of knowledge from marginalised and often silenced youth to adults in positions of decision-making power.

Presenters
DH

Daphne Hutt-MacLeod

Director-Eskasoni Mental Health Services & Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq Crisis & Referral Centre; Coordinator of Tui'kn Residential School Survivor Team at Eskasoni Mental Health Services Daphne Hutt-Macleod (MA Psych), Director of Eskasoni Mental Health/NS Crisis & Referral Centre/Tui'kn Partnership Residential School Survivor Team, has worked for over 25 years within First Nations communities as a Psychologist, Director of Health, and... Read More →
avatar for Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg

Linda Liebenberg, PhD., Co-Director Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, is a researcher and evaluator with a core interest in children and youth with complex needs. Her work explores the promotion of positive youth development and mental health, using formal and informal processes of resilience, through both evaluation of service provision and research of youth experiences. As a key component of this work, Linda reflects... Read More →
MD

Mallery Denny

Mallery Denny, Youth Support Worker, Eskasoni Mental Health Service (EMHS), has worked in mental health with EMHS for the past 6 years with experience in youth support and crisis work. Mallery has also been involved in research collaborations and played a key role in the Spaces and Places Research Project in Eskasoni. Prior to working with EMHS Mallery often volunteered at community events in Eskasoni and her dedication to building community... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DH

Daphne Hutt-MacLeod

Director-Eskasoni Mental Health Services & Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq Crisis & Referral Centre; Coordinator of Tui'kn Residential School Survivor Team at Eskasoni Mental Health Services Daphne Hutt-Macleod (MA Psych), Director of Eskasoni Mental Health/NS Crisis & Referral Centre/Tui'kn Partnership Residential School Survivor Team, has worked for over 25 years within First Nations communities as a Psychologist, Director of Health, and... Read More →
JR

Jenny Reich

Researcher, Resilience Research Centrere
Project Manager Spaces and Places, RRC at Resilience Research Centre Jenny Reich, Researcher and Evaluator Resilience Research Center, Dalhousie University, is the project manager of the Spaces and Places Research Project in Eskasoni, Canada. Her experience working on S&P exposed her to the use of participatory data analysis and allowed her to explore the use of visual methods in research. Jenny’s research experience with the RRC has... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Stories of Resilience - Wanda Taylor, Diane Parris, Jane Arnfield
Stories of Resilience:

Abstract #69
Suitcase of Survival
Presenter: Jane Arnfield Co - Presenter: Tony Harrington
Abstract:
Live witness testimony is an integral tool to accessing further testimony. Working with host, testimonial witnesses seeking to uncover new and engaging ways to demonstrate how testimony can continue to have a living presence through a series of surrogates. Through physical and intellectual exercises Suitcase of Survival investigates and excavates how resilience is formed and how resilience is maintained. The work of SOS depends on defining core values - personal, individual core values which contribute to building of personal resilience, helping both the development of the individual and the individual operating with a group. Utilising drama based approaches, the participants activate a personal opportunity to reflect on their life, explore their own decision making and construct or deconstruct their one value systems with the single aim of developing and nurturing themselves as active citizens - as citizens of activism. The multimodal creative programme Suitcase of Survival not only provides participants  with the tools to meet the challenges and responsibilities of active citizenship and an awareness of global communities but its themes provide a fertile ground for innovative art making. Central to Suitcase of Survival (SOS) is the exploration of memory and personal history, diversity, human rights, empathy, identity and interdependence.

Abstract #97
Courage to Heal: A Case Examination of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children 
Presenter: Wanda Taylor
Abstract:
This paper presentation will examine how certain children who have experienced extreme childhood trauma manage to overcome horrific circumstances and find a way to cope in their everyday lives. The paper will use the example from my book on the case of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children. Established in 1921 as an orphanage for Black children in Nova Scotia at a time when they were not permitted entry into mainstream orphanages, this institution was to be the best thing to ever happen to those poor, abandoned children. 
It wasn’t until former residents found the courage, as adults, to come forward and tell their stories (by way of a class action law suit filed against the institution and the province) that society became aware of the extremely disturbing circumstances under which those children lived. Stories of brutal rape, extreme physical abuse, near starvation, emotional and sexual abuse and neglect were a part of the everyday lives of these children, who were already coming from less than ideal circumstances. Relying on extensive interviews with former residents and making reference to Keck and Sakdapolrak’s definition of social resilience (2013), the presentation will examine issues of resiliency and coping.

Abstract #216
Live MY Life: See What It's Like
Presenter: Diana Parris
Abstract:
Youth in care tell us with frank honesty about what works and what gets in the way. 
Our workshop presents youth in care‘s experiences about what works and what gets in the way of good CYC practice.  In the workshop, audience members are challenged to take active roles in promoting youth voice in their work, as well as in quality assurance and program evaluation for agencies. 
We conclude the workshop with a youth voice video – created  by at risk youth, expressing their voice:  “Live MY Life: See what it’s like” funded by the  KB Knowledge
“What do they tell us”: We conducted focus group discussions and individual interviews with present & former youth in care who shared with us the critical skills, qualities, attitudes, beliefs, values, cultural competence and  self-awareness required by CYCP’s : what works and what doesn’t work. 
Our research speaks to the obligation we have to find ways to incorporate youth voice and feedback into ongoing quality assurance or program evaluations in youth services : evaluation needs to be mandated and iterative.

Presenters
DP

Diane Parris

Faculty, Child and Youth Care Program, Red River College
Faculty at Child and Youth Care Program Red River College Diane Parris graduated with a Diploma in Child and Youth Care from Confederation College in Thunder Bay. Upon moving to Manitoba, she spent eight years working frontline in both community group care and locked residential treatment. Diane went on to work in British Columbia in a CFS youth receiving facility and a specialized day treatment facility for younger children with behavioural... Read More →
avatar for Jane Arnfield

Jane Arnfield

Reader in Arts & Director of Fine & Visual Arts Programmes, Northumbria University UK
Jane is an Associate Artist with the Cambodian Documentation Centre (DC-Cam) in Phnom Penh, and a recently appointed member of the museum team for The Sleuk Rith Institute committed to building a permanent documentation centre in Phnom Penh managed by Youk Chhang. Jane has a commitment to researching, constructing and disseminating theatre practice within education and for four years worked with Cassop Primary School in County Durham as an Artist... Read More →
avatar for Wanda Taylor

Wanda Taylor

Presenter Biography: Wanda Taylor is a Social Worker, Film Producer, Author and Educator who has worked with children and youth for over twenty years in various capacities; including as a child welfare social worker, case manager, emergency crisis worker, and as counselor for homeless and at-risk youth. Wanda is a former CBC Television producer and has also produced independent documentaries shedding light on social justice issues. As a community... Read More →

Co-Presenters
TH

Tony Harrington

Executive Director at The Forge | The Forge lead by Tony Harrington is a leading, internatonal organisating speacialsing in participatory arts practice. An example of their work is Suitcase of Survival SOS an educational toolkit and evolving, learning programme including best practice models of community engagement and creative workshop delivery in schools, Higher Education, charities, non-government organisations to name examples. To date... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Theraputic Methods - Renata Maria Coimbra-Libório, Cleve Sauer, Roberta Greene
Theraputic Methods:

Abstract #123
Resilience Enhancing Stress Model
Presenter: Roberta Greene
Abstract:
There is a burgeoning of information and research about resilience. Yet, the term is often vague, poorly defined, and applied in a variety of situations and circumstances. What can be done to avoid these pitfalls and what sometimes may be false dichotomies? Clearly, there is a need for a holistic model suitable to describe the process of risk and resilience both for individuals and systems, and for various populations experiencing stressful/ adverse events. 
This paper presents the Resilience Ecological-Stress Model (RESM) to illustrate how people and the various systems in which they live build on their innate ability to function effectively in their environments. The premise is that resilience needs to be seen as nested within multiple layers of individual and collective adaptive factors that explain how people cope with stress and maintain their daily functioning. 
The paper outlines the major assumptions and terms used in ecological-systems theory, describing how these theoretical concepts lead to a better understanding of the origin(s), development, and maintenance of resilience. In addition, the RESM has practical applicability, describing how the ability to respond well to stress can be learned in natural settings and enhanced through therapeutic intervention.

Abstract #132
How Therapeutic Clowning Contributes to Child and Family Resilience within a Pediatric Health Centre
Presenter: Cleve Sauer Co - Presenter: Alan McLuckie
Abstract:
Children faced with threats to their physical well-being can experience high stress levels within hospitals and during medical procedures, which can contribute to mental distress and emotional difficulties. Many children demonstrate resilience, arising from their inner resources and nurtured through supportive relationships and interactions with caregivers, family members and medical staff.  This paper presents how the work of Buddington, the therapeutic clown at The IW5850/58K Health Centre contributes to the resilience of children who are hospitalized or visit the IWK for medical procedures. Since, 2006 Buddington has been a key member of the Child Life Program at the IWK providing developmentally sensitive therapeutic-play interactions for children and their families from across the Maritime Provinces who access the pediatric inpatient units and outpatient clinics at the IWK.  Never coming out of ‘character’ Buddington moves throughout the hospital environment engaging all he meets through gentle and inclusive play and humor. Theory, research and practice-based evidence, along with experiential activities guided by Buddington, will be threaded together within this paper presentation to demonstrate how this strength-based intervention can reduce mental distress in children by harnessing and maximizing the potential of the young person, caregivers, family members and hospital staff.

Abstract #163
Arts and Resilience
Presenter: Renata Maria Coimbra-Libório Co - Presenter: Bernardo Monteiro de Castro
Abstract:
This presentation will focus on the links between arts and resilience, grounded in researches carried out with at risk youth and people with disabilities.
(i) Arts as a means of expression
It is very common to hear from different artists that their work is therapeutic. An esthetical expression can be useful either to externalize a psychological pain or to organize a subjective conflict. Since art offers resources for a non-rational discourse, its outcomes provide, for one who expresses by this means, a deeper sense of wholeness and self-understanding. It will be presented a short-documentary about a poet woman with disability.
  (ii) Engaging in esthetical experience
Although art is not precisely defined, combining verses is not enough to write a good poem. However, someone who is not a good dancer can feel very well having dance classes. The experience of feeling the body expressing affects and ideas can help an individual to have a better consciousness of him/herself and to realize that the existence of some problems is not sufficient to avoid good emotions and pleasure. Grounded on the theoretical approach of Barbara Rogoff, it will be presented data about the “Negotiating resilience research” carried out in Aquarela project in Brazil.


Presenters
CS

Cleve Sauer

Cleve Sauer, BA (Psychology), BSW, MSW (candidate), is employed on a full-time basis with the Child Life Department at the IWK Health Centre in the role of Therapeutic Clown (Buddington). His area of professional interest is the application of creative psycho-social therapeutic approaches in pediatric health care.
avatar for Renata Maria Coimbra-Libório

Renata Maria Coimbra-Libório

Professor PhD, São Paulo State University
Renata Maria Coimbra-Liborio is Psychologist, with master and PhD in Developmental Psychology at University of São Paulo (USP). Professor at Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), at Graduate Program in Education, in Presidente Prudente, Brazil. She has a professional master's degree (MBA) in Cinema documentary.She carried out a Postdoctoural research in Portugal (2005-2006) on Sociology of Childhood, and in Halifax (Dalhousie University... Read More →
RG

Roberta Greene

Roberta Greene was professor and the Louis and Ann Wolens Centennial Chair in Gerontology and Social Welfare at the School of Social Work University of Texas-Austin. She previously was professor and dean at the Indiana University School of Social Work and has worked at the Council on Social Work Education and the National Association of Social Workers. Dr. Greene has numerous publications including Resiliency Theory: An Integrated Framework for... Read More →

Co-Presenters
BM

Bernardo Monteiro de Castro

PhD in Literature at UFMG | Bernardo M. Castro holds a degree in Psychology and MA and PhD in Literature from the Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, a post-doctorate in Medieval Literature and other post-doctorate in Developmental Psychology and Resilience, both at the University of Cincinnati - USA (2002-2003). Has experience in the areas of psychology, with an emphasis in Developmental Psychology and Clinical Psychology, and... Read More →
AM

Alan Mcluckie

Assistant Professor at University of Calgary, Faculty of Social Work | Alan McLuckie, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at The University of Calgary, Faculty of Social Work. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University and provides clinical supervision to the IWK Family Therapy Training Program. Alan is supervisor with the Canadian Association for Child and Play Therapy.


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

1:45pm

Youth at Risk - Rashid Ahmed, Jaswant Guzder, Ahmad Feroz Hematyar
Youth at Risk:

Abstract #68 
A Review of the Community Level Protective Factors for Youth Violence 
Presenter: Rashid Ahmed Co-presenters: Maghboebah Mosavel, Cindy Petersen
Abstract:
While the focus on protective factors for youth violence is extremely helpful there is still a relative paucity of data on community level protective factors. To address this gap the present study will identify and review community level factors for youth violence. A systematic review methodology will be used to identify protective factors in both research and intervention studies. The review will focus primarily on the extent to which the relationship between the identified protective factors are discussed in the studies and the extent to which theories of resilience are utilised. Current conceptualisations of community resilience will also be reviewed to assess their relevance for youth violence especially in low-income contexts. Directions for future research will identify gaps in the literature on protective factors and the major issues to be considered in developing theories of community resilience.

Abstract #181
Promoting Resilence in High Risk Children in Jamaica With the Dream a World Program: A Multimodal Community Model
Presenter: Jaswant Guzder
Abstract:
The effectiveness of the dream a world intervention model (multimodal afterschool and summer for 3 years) was evaluated in an initial school pilot within a garrison community of inner city Jamaica selecting a cohort (with matched controls) of 30 highly disruptive children who were failing by grade 2-3. The pilot was developed as a school based intervention integrating teachers, artists and therapists as collaborators and using measures of aseba, academic performance and qualitative data. A grand challenges grant 2012 to 2015, initiated a further cohort of 100 identified grade 3 high risk children from four impoverished communities. In 2014 the government of Jamaica has initiated an expansion to 35 new schools. The program target is reduction of violence, retention of pupils into academic high school placements, as well as engagement of parents, school and community in supporting child development. Arts and culturally based activities are integrated with literacy and numeracy, psychotherapeutic milieu and group work in an action research model centered in each school. The results are validating significant academic gains and behaviour changes with global functioning improvements though there are gender differences in outcomes.

Abstract #84
Afghanistan-Canada Community Network Creation and Intervention
Presenter: Ahmad Feroz Hematyar Co - Presenter: Owoyemi Ibrahim Segun
Abstract:
ASHNA-AYIA aspires to build sustainable, sound, safe, balanced civic communities of the highest standards for the Afghans in a diverse environment conducive to their growth, development and well-being a legitimate and integral part for cross-border information sharing between Afghanistan-Canada.
The core values of this abstract is to upholds the importance of putting people first an anti-discriminatory, diverse and barrier-free environment of acceptance, tolerance and understanding in order to ensure development of education, empowering youth, providing assistance to displaced proportion of the Afghan communities. Likewise seek cross-border exchange of knowledge, experience and professional development. The core purpose of cross-border co-op is to provide easy access to quality social and community services with professionalism by promoting well-being quality of life for all communities; develop volunteering programs to between both countries to exchange experts for sharing of knowledge/expertise to safeguard transparency; promote Afghan heritage overseas in the context of Canadian life; enhance skills which promote self-sufficiency and work within an anti-discriminatory framework to ensure a respectful, safe inclusive environment to eradicate insurgencies, raise transparency, government programs advocacy and more.
In addition, Community intervention would foster cultural awareness and improved integration of at-risk Afghan youth. Therefore, the focus of the program is on youth development and youth leadership and disability-related components necessary for youth to participate fully in all aspects of their lives and society in order to change the face of the community; likewise to involve community intervention to the peaceful development, transformation and to keep their communities away from crime, illiteracy and darkness.

Presenters
AF

Ahmad Feroz Hematyar

Ahmad Feroz Hematyar is the President-Country Director of ASHNA-AIYA based in Canada. He’s been involved in the Community development, immigration, capacity building, business development and involvement in the government funding projects for the past 11yrs. In addition, he’s been the authored to three books (Afghanistan-splendor of Asia, Afghan-China Relations (present-past), and Investment opportunity in Afghanistan). Likewise, he’s... Read More →
avatar for Jaswant Guzder

Jaswant Guzder

head of child psychiatry, centre for child development and mental health, mcgill university
Associate Professor McGill Psychiatry.Head of child psychiatry and director of childhood disorders day hospital program at jewish general hospital , mcgill division of child psychiatry. founding director of cultural consultation service at mcgill with active clinical and teaching involvement in the division of social and cultural psychiatry. associate of mcgill school of social work.active in global health projects currently in india and grand... Read More →
RA

Rashid Ahmed

I am a senior lecturer and clinical psychologist with an interest in community psychology. As both a practitioner and a researcher I have been involved in the area of violence and injury prevention. One of my interests is in community resilience.I am interested in particularly how social action and spiritual and other belief systems act as protective factors for negative outcomes.

Co-Presenters
MM

Maghboebah Mosavel

Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University | Associate Prof Mosavel is in the Department of Social and Behavioural Health at the Virginia Commonwealth University. She has been extensively involved in community based participatory research.One of her interests is the extent to which civic participation can promote positive health outcomes in communities
CP

Cindy Petersen

Ms Petersen is completing her training as a clinical psychologist. Her research for this course is on a systematic review of community level protective factors for youth violence in low income contexts.
OI

Owoyemi Ibrahim Segun

Deputy Directors Committee Head/ Program and Operation Director at Assistance to Support Humanity and Need for Aid Organization / ASHNA Afghanistan International Youth Association | Owoyemi Ibrahim Segun born on 27 / November / 1978 in Ibadan, Oyo State of Nigeria, he started his basic education and secondary school in Ibadan, Oyo State of Nigeria, he hold higher Diploma in Computer Science from Kwara State Polytechnic and B.Sc in Business... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 1:45pm - 3:15pm
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

3:15pm

Break
Relax and converse with colleages before more paper presentations.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:15pm - 3:45pm
King's College King's College

3:45pm

Concurrent Paper Presentations
Enjoy presentations by Angie Hart, Anne Rathbone, and Valerie Shapiro, on topics such as Building Resilience, Disabilities, and The Power of Music.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
King's College King's College

3:45pm

Alternative Approaches To Resilience - Leo Deux Fils Dela Cruz, Pradeep Dhakal, Masego Katisi
Alternative Approaches to Resilience:

Abstract # 119
Inner Healing
Presenter: Leo Deux Fils Dela Cruz
Abstract:
Psychological trauma survivors, generally can deal with difficulty concentrating, sleep disturbances, eating disorder, the physiological sequelae and other signs and symptoms. Over time, homeostasis sets in, but the most debilitating aspect is the deterioration of self image where survivors lose their sense of self worth, overwhelmed by feeling of rejection, helplessness, emptiness and meaninglessness of life. These are the ones that are damaging. These distortions of the perceived self are the drivers of maladaptive behaviors -- the extreme form of these are homicide and suicide.Reversing such distortions, being the most crucial goal in psychotherapy, it is to be noted that immediate relief is attained by using the following: 1. Identifying the Trauma Sources (The Accumulated Incidents)2. Self-Concept Damage Report 3. Psychospiritual Protocol (The Sanctuary, Guided Meditation,) 4. Clarification of Accountability (Empower the survivor to achieve emotional maturity is achieved because of and not in spite of the trauma).It is apparent that although traumatic experiences are naturally-occurring, resiliency is also innate in human nature. The therapist simply guides, prompts or enables. The techniques facilitates integration and deepens meaning of life.

Abstract # 135  
Learning from Mother Nature for the Resilience in Early Childhood
Presenter: Pradeep Dhakal Co-Presenter: Bishnu Hari Bhatta
Abstract:
Engagement in extracurricular activities is very important to early childhood development because it fosters confidence, creativity, and teaches important life skills and helps children to reach their full potential. PSD Nepal has been working with fifteen schools and two orphanages and conducts extracurricular activities. Such as, students are taken to the hilly areas, rivers and ponds so that they understand Mother Nature to nurture their fullest potential. 

Abstract # 206 
Exploring alternative approaches to evaluating the effectiveness of a resilience program in Botswana
Presenter: Masego Katisi Co-Presenter: Marguerite Daniel 
‘Ark’ is a locally developed, national program for promoting resilience among vulnerable children run by ten district councils in Botswana since 2007. The operating partners are the Government of Botswana and an NGO called Ark and Mark Trust. The program involves community participation and revives aspects of traditional initiation. It consists of two parts: a two-week wilderness-based psycho-social strengthening camp for selected groups of adolescents, and village-based follow-up activities for three years. Face validation shows graduates of the program improve in their school performance and behavioural responses to stress. Standard evaluation tools, including surveys pre and post camp and throughout the three years, are in place. However, the quality of the data produced is poor. The aim of this paper is to critically analyse reasons for the poor quality of the evaluation data and to explore alternative methodologies that more effectively investigate cultural understandings of resilience. Survey data are incomplete and inconsistent leading us to question whether the standard tools are contextually incompatible. The existing tools are limited and unable to capture the diverse social processes that the program uses. We explore participatory research as a more appropriate methodology for capturing the outcomes of these multiple social processes.  

Presenters
LD

Leo Deux Fils Dela Cruz

Dr. LEO DEUX FILS Mijares DELA CRUZ is a Licensed Psychologist and Board-Certified in Stress Management (B.C.S.M.) by the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress. He obtained his doctorate degree at the University of Santo Tomas in Manila where he taught for more than three decades; currently heads the St. John of the Cross Center for Psychological Intervention and Traumatic Stress Management. His book, Emotional First Aid Kit... Read More →
MK

Masego Katisi

Masego Katisi is the director of Ark and Mark Trust in Botswana, and is the pioneer in developing a psychosocial support concept that is now replicated by the government of Botswana. She is currently a PhD student in health promotion and development at the HEMIL Centre, University of Bergen. Her research interests are children and resilience and partnerships in Aid programming, particularly in Botswana.
PD

Pradeep Dhakal

Dr. Pradeep Dhakal is from Nepal. He completed his PhD in Religion and Peace (Hinduism and Peace) from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India in 2010. Pradeep worked as a Lecturer in Tribhuvan University for 2004-2005. He has written several books, including 'The Forlorn Journey' (Genuine request to the Educated people to work for Peace and Humanity) and 'The Quest' (A request for all the women of the world to shoulder the responsibility of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
BH

Bishnu Hari Bhatta

Bishnu Hari Bhatta has completed his Masters Degree in Business Administration. He is currently working as Director for Partnership for Sustainable Development Nepal for the last ten years. He is also representative from Asia for World Forum Foundation.
MD

Marguerite Daniel

Associate professor, University of Bergen, Norway
Dr at University of Bergen Marguerite Daniel is currently an associate professor of development-related health promotion at the HEMIL Centre, University of Bergen. Her research interests include children affected and infected by HIV, the impact on social cohesion of international aid targeting children, and local and global perspectives on child protection, in southern and eastern Africa, in particular Botswana and Tanzania. Her theoretical... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Classroom 3 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Building Resilience - Angie Hart, Dorothy Bottrell
Building Resilience:

Abstract #83 
HeadStart in Action: Building Emotional Resilience in Children and Young People in Local Communities Across England
Presenter: Angie Hart
Abstract:
This paper gives an overview of resilience approaches being developed through Headstart, a Big Lottery Funded (BLF) £75 million experimental fund to build emotional resilience in 10-14 year olds. HeadStart aims to go beyond implementing piecemeal projects. Twelve geographical areas are involved. They are being encouraged to implement a systems-wide, co-productive approach. This ambitious programme has the potential to impact significantly on children’s mental health support across the UK and beyond. Following development grants in Phase 1, each of the 12 areas was awarded £500,000 in summer 2014 for Phase 2, a ‘test and learn’ stage. They are experimenting with, and learning from different approaches, working ecologically with children, young people, their families, schools and wider systems. Areas are both targeting the needs of children at high risk of developing mental health issues, and also working with children more widely. This presentation gives an overview of the content of the phase 2 projects which varies between areas. Initiatives include: the running of licensed, school-based resilience programmes, mental health first aid, training of practitioners in resilience approaches, young people led resilience projects, community arts projects etc. The multi-stakeholder engagement aspect of this programme presents both opportunities and challenges, as does operationalising resilience in these contexts, and at this scale.

Abstract #158
Responsibility, Resilience and Youth Leadership in Emerging African Communities of Melbourne 
Presenter: Dorothy Bottrell
Abstract:
Responsibility, resilience and youth leadership in emerging African communities of Melbourne This paper presents findings from a study conducted with young leaders of emerging African communities in Melbourne. Framed within a political ecology approach (Bottrell & Armstrong 2012), individual and community resilience are understood as interdependent with the policies, public discourses and socially inclusive and exclusive practices that impact emerging communities. Young African Australians in Melbourne have been negatively represented in the commentaries of mainstream media and politicians. In these public discourses they have been cast as disengaged, criminal or “at-risk” and as needing to be made responsible. Despite the common experience of racism, stereotyping, policing and violence that are barriers to acculturation, sense of belonging and participation in the broader Australian community (Refugee Council of Australia 2009), these young leaders maintain a positive outlook, aspire to personal success and contribute to their community’s development. The paper discusses how young people understand their chosen responsibilities in terms of roles, relationships and goals. In contrast to the discourse of responsibilisation, young leaders’ accounts elaborate the close interrelationship of responsibilities and resilience. 



Presenters
avatar for Angie Hart

Angie Hart

Angie Hart is Professor of Child, Family and Community Health at the University of Brighton and has been working on resilience research and practice for 10 years. She is an advisor to England’s Big Lottery Fund, Angie runs boingboing, a not for profit undertaking resilience research and practice development. http://www.boingboing.org.uk/index.php/who-are-we/angie-hart. She is the Academic Director of the University of Brighton’s Community... Read More →
DB

Dorothy Bottrell

Senior Lecturer at Victoria University, Melbourne Australia | Dorothy Bottrell is a Senior Lecturer in the College of Education and a member of the Mobilities, Transitions and Resilience Network of the Centre for Cultural Diversity and Wellbeing at Victoria University, Melbourne. Her research has focused on social and political theories of resilience and empirical studies examining young people’s resilience in relation to marginalised... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Building Resilience in Education - Chris Brown, Elizabeth Woodford-Collins, Gwen Gilmore
Building Resilience in Education:

Abstract # 102
Bridging Worlds-Building Community: Fostering Inclusive, Equity-Based Education
Presenter: Chris Brown Co-Presenter: Sarah Gazan
Abstract:
Through practical conversations based on experience, the presenters will discuss three conversations that need to take place to foster an equity- based, Culturally Proficient education. All of these conversations work to foster resiliency for youth by changing conversations about resiliency from a focus on the individual to a focus on creating a more enabling social environment. Conversation One This conversation is about knowledge, and how we make sense of the world based on our internalized, socialized experiences. Equity education is not about acquiring more external knowledge, but about challenging our internalized norms, values, beliefs and knowledge that shape our actions and maintain inequity. Conversation Two Conversation two is about the role of conversation and dialogue to critique inequity, and create a better understanding of our resistance to learning about oppression. This conversation creates the impetus for personal reflection that may lead to perspective transformation. Conversation Three This conversation is about creating inclusive education environments that benefit minoritized and marginalized students. The focus of this conversation is on understanding the social construction of difference, and advocating for places and spaces of safety for those whose identities reside outside of the mythical norm.  

Abstract # 113 
Building the Connected Classroom
Presenter: Elizabeth Woodford-Collins Co-Presenter: John Cochrane, Peter Smith, Jackie Leonard
Abstract:
Many teachers question their students’ lack of resilience as they display distress over seemingly insignificant stimulus. There are many contributing factors for this lack of resilience. Many of our student's stories follow similar patterns: lack of sleep, high expectations from self/peer/parent, work pressures, social media interactions, learning challenges, socioeconomic stress, bubble-wrapped kids and personal stories resulting in a traumatized youth. With this emotional overload, our youth's ability to deal with life's issues is compromised and many are left feeling powerless.We propose to help restore equilibrium as we provide for alternate conversations, rebuild confidence and improve resilience. How?The biggest question for many NS high school students is, “What is next?”The traditional classroom combined with the connected classroom results in purposeful and self-directed study, cross-curricular connections and a career plan that builds confidence and resilience.What does the connected classroom look like?1. Compulsory career course (gr 11)2. COOP 3. Service Learning 4. Experiential learning/inquiry based learning (career focus)5. Portfolio 6. Fundamental questions are answered: Who Am I/Where do I want to go in life/ What are my skills/interests? 7. Learning Plan: Educational/Career pathways 8. Relationships/FacilitationThis is about making connections for all youth.

Abstract # 178   
The Role of Relational Resilience in Building Academic Pathways For Students: Interdisciplinary Case Studies From Melbourne, Australia.
Presenter: Gwen Gilmore Co-Presenter: Marcelle Cacciattolo, Dan Loton
This paper examines relational resilience after Jordan (2012) who argues for a move beyond individual responsibility for ‘resilience’ to examine the relational dynamic processes and interconnections of individuals with their community. We explore here the experience of prospective students who fail to meet university entrance scores and enrol in an alternative diploma program at an Australian university. Student communities include families, the staff and innovative groups based experiences of curriculum and pedagogy. These students’ cases reveal capacities to make strategic choices that support agency for academic success as well as the multi-dimensional and contextual processes that are negotiated in context. The case studies draw attention to higher education factors that can either inhibit or encourage students’ capacity to deal with day to day opportunities and challenges that university life brings. Findings highlight how university systems and teaching can fuel resilience for learners who come from a range of diverse backgrounds.
 


Presenters
EW

Elizabeth Woodford-Collins

Beth Collins has worked in the secondary and post-secondary academic setting for fifteen years, in both urban and rural situations. Working with Masters level students to IB students to IPP students, Beth has discovered one educational truth, Allie Mooney’s motto, “If you can reach me then you can teach me.”. Her work with the Options and Opportunities and COOP programs, service learning initiatives and experiential learning help create the... Read More →
GG

Gwen Gilmore

Dr Gwen Gilmore has bought to Victoria University 27 years of teaching experience in secondary, primary and tertiary settings, as well as roles in educational leadership, management and policy advice, in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia.Gwen has a long-standing interest in developing strength based approaches to teaching and learning in special and regular education, alongside interests in systems leadership, research design and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
MC

Marcelle Cacciattolo

Associate Professor, Victoria University
Associate Professor Marcelle Cacciattolo is a sociologist and an academic in the College of Education at Victoria University. She received her PhD from Monash University in 2002. Over the last decade her research has been cross-disciplinary involving health sciences and education-based research. Other research projects that Marcelle has been involved include young people and their wellbeing, refugee relocation, social justice and learning... Read More →
JC

John Cochrane

Coordinator, Community-Based Learning at Education and Early Childhood Development | John Cochrane has held various positions in education with many years in co-operative education. As Coordinator of Community-Based Learning, he is responsible for a number of projects including service learning and cooperative education.
SG

Sarah Gazan

Education Research Analyst at Manitoba Teachers' Society | Ms. Sarah Gazan is a member of the Wood Mountain Lakota Nation. She has worked in the First Nations and Provincial school systems as a classroom teacher and at the divisional and provincial levels in the areas of Aboriginal education, program planning and
JL

Jackie Leonard

Guidance at SSRSB | Jackie is presently in her 10th year as the school counselor at Liverpool Regional High School. As an educator for 35years, Ms. Leonard has held many positions: in the classroom, in resource, and as a school counsellor. She has taught at the elementary,
DL

Dan Loton

Educational Research Advisor at Centre for Collaborative Learning and Teaching, Victoria University | Dan recently attained his Doctor of Philosophy in the field of Psychology on the topic of video game addiction. He has experience in research administration and diverse research projects, particularly in the fields of Psychology and Education. Dan’s educational research has broadly focussed on improving outcomes for low socio-economic... Read More →
PS

Peter Smith

Coordinator, Youth Pathways and Transitions at Education and Early Childhood Development | Peter Smith has held many positions in education both internationally and in Nova Scotia. As Youth Pathways and Transitions Coordinator, he is responsible for programs which provide multiple pathways through and successful transitions from secondary school.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Disabilities - Anne Rathbone, Ida Skytte Jakobsen, Hariclia Petrakos
Disabilities:

Abstract # 110  
Developing a Co-Inquiry Group of Young Adults with Learning Disabilities on Resilience: Methods, Opportunities, Challenges
Presenter: Anne Rathbone Co-Presenter: Mikey Reynolds, Berhana W, Fraser Caygill, Sophie Halas 
Abstract:
This presentation explores co-inquiry research from the University of Brighton, with 16 learning disabled young adults who are members of Arts Connect, a community programme. The academic aim is to explore contextual experience of resilience and to understand whether involvement in participatory research helps build resilience. The community co-researchers aim to become more resilient, share their research with others creatively and to learn new skills along the way. The presentation will address the gap in participatory resilience research with this group, describing processes that the co-researchers found useful in exploring resilience, key things that co-researchers feel can improve their resilience and ways in which their collective actions have challenged discrimination and self-advocated for social justice. The community co-researchers say:“At first, we didn’t know what resilience meant but now we realize we are experts, because we face challenges and discrimination every day that need resilience. We are all equal in our research group - that’s great for resilience because we have power. Resilience is important for everyone and different for everyone. We hope that our particular knowledge and experiences will help people think about resilience in new ways, and because we are creative it will be interesting and fun.”

Abstract # 196   
Inclusion for Children at Risk 
Presenter: Ida Skytte Jakobsen
Abstract:
The shift towards inclusive education where children with special needs are transited from a special school environment to mainstream school environment may create new risk factors for vulnerable children. In order to ensure a resiliency process for those children it is important the special knowledge is available for the teachers in the mainstream school. This study address the two following questions:  
1. How can teachers in the school use special knowledge to develop the general educational efforts in relation to groups of vulnerable children? 
2. How can teachers in school access and apply relevant knowledge from professionals in the municipality who possess specialized knowledge?

Abstract # 237  
A Child-Family-School Participatory Action Research to Promote Resilience Against Bullying in Children with Learning Difficulties
Presenter: Hariclia (Harriet) Petrakos Co-Presenters: Janet Strike Schurman, Cassandra Monette 
Abstract:
Research has shown that bullying in Canada is linked to many negative outcomes (Craig & Pepler, 2003). Children with learning disabilities havebeen found to be involved in bullying situations and may be negatively affected, although environmental resilience may decrease these effects (Ungar, 2011). This study took an eco-systemic approach to explore the perceptions of resilience and well-being of selected elementary schoolchildren with learning disabilities in bullying situations, as well as toprovide an in-depth understanding of the multiple perspectives of schoolstaff and parents in school communities that are implementing the Quebec government's mandatory anti-bullying programs (Bill 56, enacted into lawJune 2012). This participatory qualitative research was implemented within a suburban and a rural school. Visual methods were used to uncoverimportant insights into the students' perceptions of their school experiences. Parents were interviewed and school staff participated in focus groups to identify the protective factors (positive perceptions andbehaviours) in the face of adversity (bullying situations). This researchhas the potential of informing practitioners and service providers toconsider the positive outcomes and experiences of students and theirparents' and school staff's perceptions of resilience as it plays a role in their delivery of anti-bullying programs.  

Presenters
AR

Anne Rathbone

Supervised by Professor Angie Hart, I am a PhD student with University of Brighton, UK, with 25 years community development practice and consultancy experience in participatory approaches. I am passionate about research that gives a voice to people who face discrimination. I have an MA from the University of St Andrews, Scotland and a post graduate qualifications in youth work, management and counselling. I am an associate of Boing Boing, a... Read More →
HH

Hariclia (Harriet) Petrakos

Dr. Hariclia Petrakos is an associate professor in the Department of Education at Concordia University and a member of the Centre of Research in Human Development (Concordia) and the Transcultural Research Intervention Team (McGill). She worked for a number of years as a school psychologist at Lester B. Pearson School Board with the Family and School  Support and Treatment Team. Her current research and teaching interests focus on school... Read More →
avatar for Ida Skytte Jakobsen

Ida Skytte Jakobsen

Associate Professor, University College Lillebaelt
I am trained as a clinical psychologist and has taught at the School of social work alongwith working with childred at risk. I did my PhD on how traditional risk research design can inclued a resiliency perspective. Right now I work with the significance of the inclusion agenda for children at risk.

Co-Presenters
FC

Fraser Caygill

Community Co-researcher at Arts Connect/U of Brighton | Fraser has grown in self confidence since being involved in Arts Connect and the co-inquiry research. Doing presentations has presented new challenges for him which have helped him develop his public speaking skills. He is great on the computer and has
SH

Sophie Halas

Community Co-researcher at Arts Connect/U of Brighton | Sophie is training to work with children. She loves dance and movement which she has done through Arts Connect and other projects. Sophie is a great team player who loves helping others. She is very interested in psychology and this is what inspired he
MR

Mikey Reynolds

Community co-researcher at Arts Connect/U of Brighton | Mikey loves music, especially DJ ing and is a proud member of the resilience research co-inquiry. Before he joined the research group he had little understanding of resilience but now has a firm understanding of what resilience is and what helps him be more resilient and through this he feels his resilience has grown. He has presented at two conferences previously – once to academics and... Read More →
JS

Janet Strike Schurman

Dr. at Concordia University | Janet Strike Schurman is a psychologist at the New Frontiers School Board, working with students from age 4 to 18 years in both suburban and rural schools. She is a member of l’Association québécoise des psychologu! es scolaires. She specializes in assessment and interventions for children with special needs, particularly those with neuro-behavioural difficulties, such as autism spectrum... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Seminar 7 A&A Lower Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Immigration Blues - Alexa Smith-Osborne, Marja Tiilikainen, Julie Tippens
Immigration Blues:

Abstract #250
Bicultural Youth Resilience Study
Presenter: Alexa Smith-Osborne
Abstract:
Background and Purpose:
While there are interventions to sustain resilience among children living in adversity, there is a shortage of prevention programs for specific bicultural groups. This mixed methods study investigated a manualized brief resilience theory-based parent/child program designed to assess differential susceptibility and support resilience among American military and Spanish-speaking immigrants.  
Methods:
The protocol for parallel school-age child and parent sessions was tested using a mixed methods multiple case study design (n=68).   Children were screened at pretest to ensure they did not meet criteria for a stress/trauma disorder diagnosis. Baseline data were collected at two data points including resilience and environmental measures.  Intervention phase data were collected using standardized observational behavioral rating scales and narrative progress notes. 
Results:
All children showed an increase in prosocial and self-regulated behaviors across multiple settings. An increase in engagement in positive ecosystems and decrease in risky settings occurred for 30%.  Parents reported an increase in their use of social reinforcement and reduction in punishment. Parents were also observed to increase their knowledge of environmental resources, advocacy, behavioral management strategies, and resilience factors.
Conclusions and Implications:
Brief, targeted preventive services offer cost-effective benefits to bicultural youth in  environmental resource access, self-regulation, social/ academic behaviors.

Abstract #257
Resilience Among Transnational Somali Families in Toronto: Experiences of Two Generations
Presenter: Marja Tiilikainen
Abstract:
Canadian Somali community is one of the socio-economically deprived communities in Toronto. The majority lives in social housing projects in neighborhoods that are characterized by high rates of school drop-outs, crimes and poverty.  In 2011 the high-school drop-out rate among Somali-speaking students was 25%, and since 2005, an estimated number of 50 young Canadian Somalis have been killed by gun-violence. 
However, despite challenges and adversities that the Canadian Somali community at large is facing, there are also families who have managed well as comes to employment and raising up children. In this paper, I aim to explore why some Canadian Somali families do better than the others.  Which factors may support family resilience? What is the role of (transnational) family as experienced and narrated by both parents and their children regarding wellbeing and resilience of the family? 
The paper is based on ongoing research on transnational Somali families in Canada, Finland and Somalia, funded by the Academy of Finland (2012–2017). The presentation draws from data collected during 9 moths of fieldwork in Toronto, and comprises interviews of two generations in 9 families of Somali descent, 5 focus group interviews, and other interviews with Somali communities including some participant observation.

Abstract #258
Refugee Resilience in Times of Political Insecurity: Urban Congolese Coping in Nairobi, Kenya
Presenter: Julie Tippens
Abstract:
In March 2014 the Government of Kenya issued a directive mandating all urban refugees to relocate to camps. This policy, combined with police raids in neighborhoods with high immigrant populations, placed refugees in legal limbo, sending many Congolese into hiding. This paper is based on 12-months of multi-methods research with urban Congolese refugees in Nairobi, Kenya, and examines resilience-fostering strategies employed by this group during this period of political insecurity. While most participants reported increased feelings of anxiety and depression, some individuals, households and communities utilized creative, culturally salient resilience strategies to offset the environmental instability. 
Drawing on concepts of social ecological resilience, and using positive deviance inquiry to frame ethnographic, interview and survey research, I show how perceived resilience mechanisms and supports are stratified along ethnic lines. Ethnic Banyamulenge Congolese demonstrated strong bonding mechanisms in insecure settings, relying almost exclusively on other ethnic community members, whereas other Congolese ethnic groups garnered supportive resilience resources from both inside and outside of their community.  
This paper contributes to research that seeks to identify culturally-specific forms of resilience among urban refugees, and will address variations in perceptions and uses of resilience resources across ethnic, sex and cultural lines.

Presenters
AS

Alexa Smith-Osborne

Alexa Smith-Osborne, Ph.D., M.S.W., is an Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Clinical Social Work in the School of Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington, and a licensed clinical social worker (L.C.S.W.). Dr. Smith-Osborne’s primary research interests include resilience theory development and its applications to policy/program development, and neurobehavioral-environmental transactions as underpinnings of resilience for... Read More →
avatar for Julie Tippens

Julie Tippens

Julie A. Tippens, MA, MPH is a doctor of public health candidate at the University of Arizona, where she is also pursuing a doctoral minor and graduate certificate in medical anthropology. Her research lends anthropological insight into issues of forced migration and refugee psychosocial wellbeing, and she is particularly passionate about identifying community-based strategies that foster resilience and healing in post-conflict settings. Julie... Read More →
MT

Marja Tiilikainen

Marja Tiilikainen (PhD, Adjunct Professor in comparative religion) is Academy Research Fellow at the Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Finland. She has conducted long-term research on Somali migrants and carried out ethnographic research in Finland, Northern Somalia and Canada. Her main research interests include everyday Islam, cultural aspects of health and healing, and transnational family life. She currently leads two... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Promoting Health in LGBTQ Youth - Emily Colpitts, Brian Condran
Promoting Health in LGBTQ Youth:

Abstract #141
Measuring And Understanding LGBTQ Health In Nova Scotia: Pathways To Health And Resilience
Presenter: Emily Colpitts Co - Presenter: Jacqueline Gahagan
Abstract:
Existing research indicates that the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) populations is worse than those of their heterosexual, age-matched peers. This is particularly relevant in the context of Nova Scotia given that available health data indicate that the health of those living in the Atlantic region tends to be worse than other locations in Canada. Research on LGBTQ health has traditionally taken a deficit-focused approach, which obscures the ways in which LGBTQ populations are able to respond to these health deficits and the ways in which they promote and protect their health and wellbeing. Drawing on the findings of a scoping review and consultations with members of LGBTQ communities and health service providers, this study explored innovative ways of understanding and measuring LGBTQ health in Nova Scotia in moving away from health deficits. The aim of this study is to advance the dialogue on health equity and contribute to the provision of culturally competent primary health care policies that provide resources to bolster LGBTQ resilience and wellbeing in meaningful ways.

Abstract #142
Pathways To Resiliency Through The Landscape Of HIV/HCV Prevention: Ensuring Culturally Appropriate HIV/HCV Prevention Policies For LGBTQ Youth In Atlantic Canada
Presenter: Brian Condran 
Abstract:
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) youth experience different sociopolitical environments than their age-matched heterosexual peers. Therefore, ensuring that healthcare policies enable LGBTQ youth to navigate pathways to resiliency requires an understanding of their unique social context, how it is shaped by healthcare policy, and how these policies can be reoriented to facilitate resiliency. 
The 3-year, NSHRF-funded study Our Youth, Our Response examined youth-oriented HIV/HCV prevention policies and programs across the Atlantic Provinces. This qualitative study consisted of a scoping review of extant HIV/HCV prevention policy documents, and a thematic analysis of one-on-one and focus group interviews.  Our analysis focused on identifying key recommendations to support the development of youth-oriented policies that will enable youth to access HIV/HCV prevention information and services, and increase navigability of the HIV/HCV prevention landscape. 
Systems-level strategies for advancing resiliency-based HIV/HCV prevention for LGBTQ youth will be discussed. Ensuring the availability and accessibility of educational material and harm reduction services is critical, as is building resiliency-promoting environments by reducing stigma and addressing misconceptions among parents, teachers, and healthcare providers. Finally, ensuring that these services are truly accessible, and activities are culturally appropriate requires the direct and meaningful involvement of LGBTQ youth themselves. 


Presenters
BC

Brian Condran

Brian Condran is a graduate student studying Health Promotion at Dalhousie University. His research focuses on LGBTQ health, sexual health promotion, health communication, and knowledge mobilization. Brian is a 2014 Fellow of the CIHR Social Research Centre in HIV prevention, and a Scotia Scholar. He also holds positions on the Board of Directors for the Public Health Association of Nova Scotia, and Health Promotion Nova Scotia.
EC

Emily Colpitts

Emily Colpitts, M.A., is a research assistant at the Gender and Health Promotion Studies Unit at Dalhousie University on the LGBTQ Pathways to Health in Nova Scotia study and the Reducing Stigma, Promoting Resilience study.

Co-Presenters
JG

Jacqueline Gahagan

Professor/Director at Gender and Health Promotion Studies Unit, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University | Jacqueline Gahagan is a Full Professor of Health Promotion, the Director of the Gender and Health Promotion Studies unit and Head of the Health Promotion Division in the School of Health and Human Performance in the Faculty of Health Professions at Dalhou


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Vroom Room A&A Lower Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Resilience in Mental Health - Robert Louis, Arshi Shaikh, Wenxin Zhang
Resilience in Mental Health:

Abstract #213
Resilience As Key Factors in the Prevention of Youth Suicide: Promising Perspectives
Presenter: Robert Louis
Abstract:
The main objective of this conference is to identify, analyze resilience factors involved in the prevention of youth suicide.
It is essentially, in terms of both empirical and theoretical data at the intersection of several disciplines, to determine the most significant factor, the missing link explaining why a suicidal person ha not committed the act. Identify and verify the relationship between resilience and stopping the suicidal gesture. We will try to answer the following questions: What is the relationship between resilience factors and the stopping of the suicidal act? What resilience factors actually worked in the non-passage to the act?

Abstract #247
Meaning of Resilience: Perspectives of Women With Postpartum Depression
Presenter: Arshi Shaikh Co - Presenters: Carol Kauppi, Hiren Rawal
Abstract:
An extensive body of research focuses upon resilience among women who encounter health issues, violence, and immigration. However, there is a dearth of research examining the meaning of resilience among women who experience postpartum depression (PPD) while residing in underserviced communities. Knowledge generated from the voices of women can facilitate the development of strengths-based interventions that specifically target such communities. 
A phenomenological study was designed to explore the meaning of resilience among women suffering from PPD in the underserviced communities of northern Ontario. Stories of personal strengths were gathered from twenty six women who met the inclusion criteria as per the purposive sampling technique. All women were 18 years and above, had experienced PPD within one year after giving birth to a live infant, and self-identified as resilient individuals. 
Narratives of women revealed debilitating effects of PPD and manifestation of resilience through interconnected existential and pragmatic strategies. Meaning-making, meaningful relationships, and self-nurturing emerged as salient dimensions of resilience. Women’s interpretations challenged the conventional dichotomy of risk versus resilience. The essence of resilience was identified as “embracing life in its entirety”. 
The findings have implications for future research and clinical practice in the areas of mental health and motherhood/parenthood.

Abstract #265
The Dynamic Interaction of DRD2 TaqIA Polymorphism and Maternal Parenting on Depressive Symptoms: Evidence From a Chinese Early Adolescent Sample
Presenter: Wenxin Zhang Co - Presenters: Y Cao, L Wang, L Ji, L Chen, K Deater-Deckard
Abstract:
Recent research suggested that gene by environment interactions on depression may vary across development. This study examined the concurrent associations between maternal parenting, DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism and adolescent depression on a sample of 1037 Chinese adolescents (M = 11.32±0.47 years old at T1) in a three-wave longitudinal study. Hierarchical regression models indicated that both maternal positive and negative parenting predicted concurrent adolescent depression significantly, whereas DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism had no main effect on depression. However, DRD2 TaqIA polymorphism interacted with negative maternal parenting significantly in predicting depression when adolescent were 11(T1) and 12 years old (T2). Specifically, adolescent of A1 carriers were more susceptible to the effect of negative parenting compared to those with A2A2 genotype. However, the interaction effect changed with age, such that it became non significant when adolescents was 13years old (T3). The findings provided a richer description of how genetic and environmental influences dynamically interact to produce early adolescents’ depression and elaborated the moderating effect of age and maternal parenting among adolescents.

Presenters
AS

Arshi Shaikh

Assistant Professor, Renison University College-University of Waterloo
Arshi Shaikh, Ph.D, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Development Studies at Renison University College-University of Waterloo and an Adjunct Professor at Laurentian University, Sudbury. She is a Registered Social Worker in the province of Ontario. Dr. Shaikh’s recent research activities pertain to the areas of family homelessness, international community development, sustainable food systems and their connections with... Read More →
avatar for Robert Louis

Robert Louis

Lecturer & PhD Cand. Applied Human Sciences, Montreal University & Laurentian University
Robert Louis is a PhD Candidate in Applied Human Sciences, at the University of Montreal, Lecturer at Laurentian University Sudbury and coordinator of York Centre in Hawkesbury. He is interested in the positive development of young people, suicide prevention and resilience factors in maltreated children. Speaker at the World Congress on Suicide in 2013, He has been invited a few times on CBC Radio Canada to comment resilience among young... Read More →

Co-Presenters
YC

Y Cao

Shandong Normal University
LC

L Chen

Shandong Normal University
LJ

L Ji

Shandong Normal University
CK

Carol Kauppi

Professor at Laurentian University | Carol Kauppi is the Director of Poverty, Homelessness and Migration, a five-year research project dealing with homelessness and migration in northern Ontario. She is also Professor of Social Work and Director of the Centre for Research in Social Justice and Policy at Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Kauppi’s research interests have focused in recent years mainly on homelessness and... Read More →
HR

Hiren Rawal

Health Promoter at Sudbury & District Health Unit | Hiren Rawal is a Health Promoter at Sudbury & District Health Unit, Ontario. Hiren completed Master of Social Work program at Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario. Hiren’s graduate thesis focused upon the intersections of mental health issues, homelessness and child welfare system. He is the recipient of the Hilary Weston Scholarship, Ontario Graduate Scholarship and CIHR... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Resilience in Women in War - Jill Trenholm, Fiona Shanahan
Resilience in Women in War:

Abstract #134
Against All Odds; Women Survivors of Sexaul Violence in the War in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo
Presenter: Jill Trenholm
Abstract:
This paper illuminates how women survivors of wartime sexual violence manage “survive-ing” in the stigmatized margins of their impoverished circumstances in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The paper departs from an ethnographic study where affected women expressed multiple losses, profound dispossession of identity and marginalization, often with a child born of rape in tow.
Eleven qualitative interviews were conducted with rural women of reproductive age recruited from several organizations supporting women after rape. Thematic analysis and Payne’s theoretical framework “Sites of Resilience” guided the analysis. Women exhibited resilience through agency and pro-active decision-making in severely compromised environments embedded in a global complexity. Faith in God, health interventions that challenge cultural understandings around sexuality, indigenous healing and strategic alliances ie with aid organizations or engaging in survival sex were cited as ways used to manage daily survival. These strategies are identified as sites of resilience and provide vital contextual knowledge for planning effective interventions. Findings suggest that strengthening collaboration between existing networks such as churches, healthcare facilities and indigenous healers could extend the reach of health services, thereby offering sustainable holistic care to those affected by rape but also to entire communities suffering from mass traumatisation associated with wartime sexual violence.

Abstract #248
Resilience in the Post-Conflict Reintegration of Young Women Formerly Associated with the Lord’s Resistance Army
Presenter: Fiona Shanahan
Abstract:
This paper seeks to shed light on the process of reintegration as experienced by young women formerly associated with the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in northern Uganda, by examining the mechanisms of agency in fostering culturally embedded processes of resiliency. Twenty-nine formerly associated young women, twenty-four of their peers who had not been abducted, and twenty-six members of their families and communities participated in interviews, group discussions and creative methodologies (Veale, 2005), such as drama, photography and mapping, in six Internally Displaced Person’s camps in northern Uganda. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (Smith & Osborn, 2008) of the data demonstrates how in contexts of severe constraint, young formerly abducted women use cultural resources to mobilize adaptive processes (Hobfoll et al., 2009) in their own lives and that this mechanism contributes to processes of resiliency. These findings offer new insights on reintegration through the contributions of a socio-cultural lens (Gillespie & Zittoun, 2010; Rogoff, 2003; Vygotsky, 1978) to analytic understandings of the use of resources in resiliency (Masten & Obradovic`, 2008; Ungar, 2008; 2011). The paper aims to support the construction of actionable knowledge that will be of use to victims and survivors, practitioners seeking to mobilize these processes and for programme design.

Presenters
FS

Fiona Shanahan

Fiona Shanahan is a Government of Ireland Post-doctoral Fellow at the School of Applied Psychology, University College Cork in Ireland, focusing on the reintegration of children and youth formerly associated with armed groups and psychosocial interventions in emergency and post-conflict settings. Fiona has worked in the areas of gender and transitional justice with the United Nations, international donors and non-governmental organizations in... Read More →
JT

Jill Trenholm

Jill Trenholm, RN PhD is a researcher/lecturer at the International Maternal and Child Health unit, Faculty of Medicine and is associated with the Centre for Gender Research, both at Uppsala University, Sweden. In September 2013 she defended her doctoral thesis, an ethnographic study entitled: Women’s Violation, Lost Children and Traumatized Masculinities; the phenomena of rape and war in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). She has... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Boardroom A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

The Power of Music - Valerie Shapiro, Joanne Ruksenas
The Power of Music:

Abstract #96
The Community Building Power of Choral Singing
Presenter: Valerie Shapiro Co - Presenters: Simon Abbott, Breanne Beckett
Abstract:
Phoenix Youth Programmes has been caring for youth in Halifax for over 25 years, and there’s a lot more that makes a person a person than just food and shelter. The blossoming personalities in our choir point to the real challenges in the lives of many of the youth who are welcomed at Phoenix: a feeling of isolation and lack of understanding, no bright moments of achievement to look back on, a personal narrative of being unmotivated or anti-social or a trouble-maker.
This paper presentation will be about the discoveries from the startling success of the Phoenix Community Choir. It will be about the impact of a vibrant, accepting and genuine community, the impact of moments of personal success in performance. We will draw from literature on the social benefits of choral singing and how that relates to building protective factors in the lives of our youth. We will present beautiful stories from Phoenix Choir’s short but crowded history. Best of all, we will share some of the choir’s music.

Abstract #241
Resilience - What Does Music Have To Do With It?
Presenter: Joanne Ruksenas
Abstract:
The introduction of the new Australian national curriculum has seen music increasingly marginalised in preschool and kindergarten classes, traditionally music rich environments.  This parallels a rise in suspensions and expulsions across this age group.  I conducted a mixed-measures study to present a case for music in the curriculum, observing 182 children taking part in early childhood music at different centres in the Brisbane area over a three year period.  From this pool, a group of 87 children were nominated by their parents for interviews, and cognitive testing.  My aim was to determine whether actively engaging with music effects resilience in preschool children.   I targeted resilience because it is a non-musical outcome that is not defined by other learning areas.  Resilience appears to be intrinsically embedded in the process of active music making, which is an important factor.  Structured music lessons, where children learn through singing and movement are important in reducing stress, increasing feelings of belonging, general well-being, and competence.   These factors have follow on effects on memory and learning.  If, as some theorists claim, we are all resilient, but some of us show it in more socially acceptable ways, active engagement with music seems to be a nudge in the right direction.



Presenters
JR

Joanne Ruksenas

Joanne is a PhD candidate from Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. Her research examines the benefits of active engagement in music on resilience in preschool aged children. Her research stems from her experiences as a teacher in music and special education in classroom and studio settings. This reflects concerns over current curriculum directions which have seen music and The Arts marginalised, particularly in state schools and most... Read More →
VS

Valerie Shapiro

I have an overall passion for working with youth and as a result have always felt a strong connection to Phoenix and its vision and mandate. I feel proud to be a part of the dynamic staff team at Phoenix.Much of my professional work has been in diverse social service fields. I started my career in Vancouver as a Behaviour Analyst working with children with autism, then moved on to New York, NY, where I worked with individuals with opiate... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SA

Simon Abbot

Choir Director at Phoenix Youth Programs
BB

Breanne Beckett

Arts Administrator at Phoenix Youth Programs


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Shatford Room A&A 2nd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Youth Anti-Violence Programs - Yvonne Vissing, Marion Cook
Youth Anti-Violence Programs:

Abstract #99
How To Create Safer Communities for Youth
Presenter: Yvonne Vissing 
Abstract:
After a variety of community violence incidents, including the Sandy Hook CT Elementary School Shooting and the Boston Marathon Bombing, we asked the question - how safe is our community?  We conducted an analysis of community safety features for youth and identified gaps at both the city and school level.  In order to address them, the community has adopted a Rights Respecting Community focus.  This presentation will talk about the original problems and ways the city and school is moving forward to address them in a creative way.

Abstract #104
Crime Prevention in Canada – Developing and Disseminating Practical Knowledge 
Presenter: Marion Cook Co - Presenters: Julie Savignac, Lucy Burke
Abstract:
Public Safety Canada's strategic outcome is a safe and resilient Canada. The National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS) contributes to achieving this goal.
The NCPS undertakes two key activities 1) supporting evidence-based crime prevention projects that help build resilience among at-risk populations; and 2) building and sharing knowledge to help practitioners and policy makers in their crime prevention efforts. 
In April, 2014 the Department began a study to analyse implementation issues in crime prevention interventions. The study mined reports from 80 funding recipients to document common implementation challenges and how they were addressed.  The study is expected to result in knowledge products designed to help inform decisions about crime prevention policies and practice. Further, the study will connect implementation issues with impact evaluation results and make links with implementation science literature.
This presentation will provide an overview of the results of the Implementation Issues study and identify the challenges and opportunities associated with:
1) Reaching crime prevention practitioners & policy makers (transforming the data and information into products that will resonate with practitioners and policy makers); and
2) Application of knowledge (uptake) - how knowledge can be used to influence decision-making.

Presenters
avatar for Marion Cook

Marion Cook

Regional Manager, Community Safety Programs, Pacific Region, Public Safety Canada
Marion Cook is the Regional Manager, Community Safety Programs for Public Safety’s Pacific Region (BC and Yukon). She has worked with the National Crime Prevention Strategy since 1999 in program development and delivery, performance measurement and knowledge management. Marion is located in Vancouver, BC.
YV

Yvonne Vissing

Yvonne Vissing, PhD, is Professor of Sociology at Salem State University where she is the founding director of their Center for Childhood & Youth Studies. Author of six books, she is a former National Institute of Mental Health Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Whiting Foundation Fellow, and speaker at the UN on the rights of children.

Co-Presenters
avatar for Lucy Burke

Lucy Burke

Senior Policy Analyst, Public Safety Canada
Lucy Burke is a Senior Policy Analyst with Public Safety Canada’s Crime Prevention Policy Unit, Crime Prevention, Corrections and Criminal Justice Directorate. Lucy has considerable expertise in project management, performance measurement and program evaluation. For more than 10 years as a Senior Evaluation Analyst, she provided guidance and expertise to a wide range of community organizations as well as provincial, territorial and... Read More →
JS

Julie Savignac

Research Analyst at Public Safety Canada | Julie Savignac is a Research Analyst in crime prevention at Public Safety Canada and the technical advisor for the Crime Prevention in Canada - Implementation Issues study. Julie is a leader in understanding implementation science as it relates to evidence-based crime prevention and has expertise in model and promising approaches for crime prevention. Julie is located in Ottawa, ON.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Youth at Risk - Jesse Near, Alexandra Restrepo, Lucienne Monique Van Erwegen
Youth at Risk:

Abstract #233
Youth Recidivism: A Qualitative Study of Risk and Resilience
Presenter: Jesse Near
Abstract:
This presentation gives voice to the experience of recidivism for youths in conflict with the law.  Research to date has explored risk and protective factors.  However, the relationships between these factors and recidivism are not well understood. Informed by a constructionist approach, this paper addresses the following key question: what do youths say they believe would help them avoid reoffending? Resilience theory has increasingly been used as a framework to explore the concept of recidivism. The present study builds upon this trend and explores the ways in which at-risk youths are resilient.  This qualitative study includes in-depth interviews of ten youths in a secure custody facility and a review of the literature on youth recidivism and resilience.  Consistent with current literature, findings in this study suggest that societal context is a significant contributing factor to youth recidivism.  Outcomes of this research invite a discussion about whether future research and interventions with at-risk youths would benefit from a continued emphasis on the social context of recidivism, particularly structural and cultural violence perspectives.  Such frameworks may assist in building trust and permitting a broader understanding of youths’ circumstances.  Research with this population is recommended as a tool for advocacy.

Abstract #239
Individual Factors, Relation Factors and Service Use Related with Resilience Among Youth 13 to 19 Years Old. Medellin, 2012
Presenter: Alexandra Restrepo Co - Presenters: Nilton Montoya
Abstract:
Objective: to determinate some individual, family and service use factors related with youth resilience.Methods: A case and control study was conducted with a Non Clinical sample (n= 608), functional resilience (n=598) and youth with risk behaviors (n=200). A survey was conducted by personal trained. The Children and Youth Resilience Measure, Service Use Measure and Parenting Practices and Lerner Positive youth measure was some of the test applied. A Structural Equations Model was calculated to determinate the factors related with being resilient. Results: Relational factors: Relation with peers the have positive behavior (Β=0,39), Relation with Peer that have problematic behavior (B-0, 056), Relation with mother (B=0,29) and Stress Familiar Factors (B=-0,005).Individual factors: Index Youth positive develop have direct related with resilience (B=0,54), aperture (B= 0,012). Service use: Service use (B=0,16) and activities participation (B=0,18). The model had adequate fit indicators (GFI=0,95, NFI (B=0,85), RMSEA=0,053)Conclusion: Individual characteristics, family, relationships with peers and appropriate contact with services are related to greater resiliency in youth.to promote resilience is necessary to carry out interventions including promoting better services for young people, promoting better relationships with parents and peers, and the development of personal abilities of the young.

Abstract #262
Pathways to Resilience in Youth
Presenter: Lucienne Monique Van Erwegen
Abstract:
This study is looking at pathways to resilience in youth. 
A survey (resilience) will be sent to about 500 children coming from different backgrounds. At the back of the questionnaire they can choose to be more involved in the study and become a member of one of the three focus groups that will be set up. Each focus group will consist of 4 to 6 members, aged between the age of 12 and 18; they will meet at least 6 times over 6 months to analyse an explain the findings of the questionnaire. The members of the focus groups will be chosen randomly from the list of people that have an interest in becoming involved in the study. Together with the professional researcher they will write up a report. Each step that will be taken will be defined by the young people, each decision is theirs. To accomplish this, the researcher will listen to the children, not only with her ears, but with her whole body. Participatory methods such as paintings, collage and photos will be used. This study will start January 1st 2015, and only preliminary findings and experiences will be presented at the conference.



Presenters
AR

Alexandra Restrepo

Professor, university of Antioquia
Alexandra Restrepo, MD, MSci, Faculty member, University of Antioquia, Colombia. Director of Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Restrepo has conduct different research about violence and resilience in Medellin Colombia.. She has designed and evaluated different programs to promote early child positive develop and prevent violence.
JN

Jesse Near

Born in Ontario, I completed my BA in Psychology in 2003 followed by my BSW in 2006, at the University of Waterloo. From 2006 until present I have been working for the Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) in a secure custody facility for male youths. In October 2014, I graduated from the MSW program at Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) and completed my thesis titled: “Youth Recidivism: A Qualitative Study of Risk and Resilience”.
avatar for Lucienne, Monique Van Erwegen

Lucienne, Monique Van Erwegen

Phd Student, Queens University Belfast
I started my career in speech therapy in Belgium. I later studied drama to support children and their communication and self esteem. I then finished a postgrad in autism in Birmingham,UK, and another postgrad in child protection at trinity college Dublin, Ireland. Finally at present I'm finishing a Phd in childhood studies at Queens University Belfast. The title for my dissertation is: Pathways to resilience in youth. All my life I have worked... Read More →

Co-Presenters
NM

Nilton Montoya

Statistician at University of Antioquia | Nilton E. Montoya, BA. Specialist in Data base management and master in software Engineer. University of Antioquia, Colombia. Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Montoya has develop different research about violence and he has published in different international and national journals.


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

3:45pm

Youth Mental Health in a School Setting - Jan Blaxall, Corrine Langill, Paul W Bennett
Youth Mental Health in a School Setting:

Abstract #70
Kids Have Stress Too!
Presenter: Jan Blaxall Co - Presenter: Janet Foster
Abstract:
Much attention has been paid recently to the development of self-regulation as an important component of successful learning and social interactions. Emotional stress is a common cause of challenging behaviour in young children. This presentation will provide background research on children’s stress and an overview of the KHST! Program. We will describe samples of activities and tools that educators, parents and children themselves can use to manage and reduce stress in child care and school settings, and examples of ways that children demonstrated this learning during our research project. Kids Have Stress Too! is an evidence based program developed by the Psychology Foundation of Canada.

Abstract #126
Escape From Pilot Project Purgatory: Scaling Up Mental Health Promotion Programming in High School
Presenter: Corrine Langill Co - Presenters: Heather Smith-Fowler, Kathy Short
Abstract:
To address the widely acknowledged crisis in youth mental health, many groups have developed school programs to promote mental health and prevent mental health problems. Unfortunately, many do not make it past the ‘pilot’ stage, and are not broadly adopted.  Others are not widely implemented because of prohibitive purchase costs.
Our presentation will outline the work of our collaborative to support a province wide implementation and rigorous evaluation of Healthy Transitions from High School (HTHS).  HTHS is a social-emotional learning program of 9 classroom sessions, designed to help youth develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes important for mental health.  It was adapted from Healthy Transitions for Young Adolescents(2006),a 5 session program currently provided by Public Health Nurses to 75% of grade 7 students in Ottawa.  These programs were developed with the collaboration of community partners, and funded through public grants and private foundations, and so carry a Creative Commons license, allowing free access to the materials.
We will present information about the program and data from the first phase of the project, including:
•         Feedback on session content from youth, educators, and expert reviewers
•         Lessons learned from pilot testing in schools
•         Feedback on evaluation tools 
•         Plans for further evaluation of the program

Abstract #140
Reclaiming At-Risk Children and Youth: A Look at Nova Scotia's SchoolsPlus Program
Presenter: Paul W Bennett
Abstract:
Nova Scotia’s program to rescue struggling children and teens, SchoolsPlus (SP), is now in over 100 schools, but the Integrated Service Delivery (ISD) program  tends to fly below the radar screen. In this stimulating child welfare policy session, the author of the June 2013 Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS) report, Reclaiming At-Risk Children and Youth will be presenting his findings and encouraging wide-open discussion. His report  contends that, while SchoolsPlus is a worthwhile provincial ISD initiative, it has lost its bearings and needs a ‘mid-term correction’ to reach its target population, the 5 to 10 per cent of children and youth at risk of going off-the rails. Coordinating existing public social services is becoming the raison d'etre rather than the expected core mission – building “communities of care,” fostering resilience from an early age, and reclaiming “at risk” children, youth and families. Come to this session and join what promise to be a lively policy discussion.



Presenters
avatar for Corrine Langill

Corrine Langill

Ms. Langill has been a nurse for close to 30 years. She has worked in intensive care, a needle exchange program, a sexual health clinic, sexuality education and adolescent health promotion. In 2005, she left Ottawa Public Health for CHEO, to lead the development of a mental health promotion program for young adolescents (Healthy Transitions). This program has now reached close to 75% of Grade 7 students in Ottawa, delivered by School Health... Read More →
JB

Jan Blaxall

Director, Dominion Learning Institute of Canada
Jan Blaxall, MASc., RECE, AECEO.C. | Expert Panel for Ontario’s Early Learning Framework. | Early Years Professional Development Centre, Dominion Learning Institute Psychology Foundation of Canada, Kids Have Stress Too! Programs, | Music Together certified teacher | Professional Educator | 30 years as an Early Childhood Education professor.
PW

Paul W Bennett

Paul W. Bennett , Ed.D. (OISE/Toronto) is Founding Director of Schoolhouse Consulting and Adjunct Professor of Education at Saint Mary’s University, Halifax. Over his career , Dr. Bennett has written many commentaries, academic articles, policy papers, and eight books, including The Last Stand (2013). His major policy papers have been published by AIMS, the Northern Policy Institute, the Society for Quality Education, and CAIS. He specializes... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JF

Janet Foster

Janet Foster, BA, RECE, AECEO.C | Janet Foster has been a professor at Fanshawe College Early Childhood Education program since 1991. Her background includes several years as part of the ECE team in Fanshawe College’s Child Care Program. Areas of teaching and expertise include children's social and emotional development, early relationships, guidance and professionalism. | Janet partnered in a research project involving ECE students&rsquo... Read More →
HS

Heather Smith Fowler

Principal Research Associate at Social Research & Demonstration Corporation | Ms. Smith Fowler BA, MA is a Research Director at SRDC’s Ottawa office. She has worked in applied health and social policy for over 25 years, with expertise in community mental health, education, population health, women’s health, and social housing.
KS

Kathy Short

Ph.D., C.Psych. Director, School Mental Health ASSIST at Hamilton-Wentworth DSB, Ontario Ministry of Education School Mental Health ASSIST Program | Kathy Short is a Clinical Child Psychologist whose research and practice interests focus on school mental health promotion, knowledge mobilization, and implementation science. She is the Director for School Mental Health ASSIST, a provincial team designed to help school boards support student... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 3:45pm - 5:15pm
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

5:15pm

Concurrent Poster Presentations, Wine and Cheese, and Door Prizes
Enjoy presentations such as Thrive by Teri Thomas-Vanos and What Youth Need To Do Well. Lessons From Youth by Mallery Denny, as well as President's wine and cheese and door prizes!


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Social Support Intervention to Improve Resilience Among Pakistani Women: A Proposed Randomized Controlled Trial
Abstract #271
A Social Support Intervention to Improve Resilience Among Pakistani Women: A Proposed Randomized Controlled Trial
Presenter: Saima Hirani Co - Presenters: Gerri Lasiuk, Colleen Norris  
Abstract:
Women’s mental health is a global health concern given the burden of mental disorders on individual women and negative implications for children and families. Like other developing countries, Pakistan’s mental health resources are inadequate to provide tertiary services for those in need. This situation calls for a paradigm shift away from symptom reduction and toward mental health promotion. There is a need for innovative interventions that are low cost, feasible, gender sensitive, and can be implemented at the primary health care level. Resilience has been associated with improved mental health and emotional well-being. Although there are clear relationships among social support, resilience, and mental health, they have not yet been tested in the Pakistani. The proposed randomized controlled trial will test a social support intervention to enhance resilience among disadvantaged women in Karachi, Pakistan. The randomly allocated intervention group will receive a 6-week social support intervention delivered by a community health worker, while the control group will receive a sham intervention. . Measures of resilience and quality of life will be compared at baseline and post-intervention. The results of the study will advance our understanding of the associations among resilience, social support, and mental health promotion in the developing world.

Presenters
SH

Saima Hirani

Ms. Hirani is a nurse by profession. She is presently pursuing PhD in nursing at University of Alberta. Her PhD dissertation focuses on promoting resilience in women living in disadvantaged areas. For last ten years, she has been involved teaching mental health, research, and bio-statistics to nursing students. Her clinical experience includes working with people with mental health issues in a diverse context. She has facilitated several sessions... Read More →

Co-Presenters
GL

Gerri Lasiuk

Associate Profesor at University of Alberta | Dr. Gerri Lasiuk is an Associate Professor and Director or the Nursing Simulation Centre in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta. Her clinical, teaching, and research interest relate to psychiatric/ mental health nursing, particularly the relationship of childhood adversity to adult health; perinatal mental health; trauma-informed healthcare; and the use of simulation in teaching... Read More →
CN

Colleen Norris

Professor at University of Alberta | Dr. Norris holds joint appointments at University of Alberta’s Faculties of Nursing, Medicine andSchool of Public Health. Her PhD, from the University of Alberta, is in clinical epidemiology and herresearch focuses on the health outcomes of patients with coronary artery disease. Dr. Norris, aNurse by training, completed post-doctoral training in health outcomes research and developed theAlberta... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Study on the Development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience for College Students in Taiwan
Abstract #330
A Study on the Development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience for College Students in Taiwan
Presenter: Wen-Chih Tseng
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Comprehensive Assessment Tools for Building Resilience (CATBR), a new assessment tool for identifying college students’ resilience. The instrument was analyzed in terms of (a) its factor structure and (b) the reliability of its resultant subscales. There are four subscales on the CATBR including: psychological flourish (21 items), spiritual wellness (20 items), social engagement (19 items) and family strength (18 items). Internal consistency was determined using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and reliability estimates of these subscales ranged from .82 to .92.The researcher conducted exploratory (N = 765) and confirmatory factor analyses (N = 738) to examine the construct validity of the CATBR. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the fit of the model of the psychological flourish, spiritual wellness, social engagement and family strength scales. Additionally, the scale's convergent and discriminant validity was also examined.According to these findings, the CATBR is an appropriate assessment tool to measure comprehensively the strengths and assets of college students. Further, the CATBR provides important information on how to enhance resilience of college students who encounter a series of setbacks. Implications for using the CATBR and recommendations for further development were discussed.

Presenters
WT

Wen-Chih Tseng

Wen-Chih Tseng is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling at National Hsinchu University of Education, Taiwan. His research interests are in positive psychology, resilience and serious play.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Systematic Review Of Studies On Ethnic Minority Students In Hong Kong: A Strident Call For Policy Makers Regarding Youth-Friendly Social Policy
Abstract #292

A Systematic Review Of Studies On Ethnic Minority Students In Hong Kong: A Strident Call For Policy Makers Regarding Youth-Friendly Social Policy
Presenter: Gizem Arat
A systematic review of studies on ethnic minority students in Hong Kong: A strident call for policy makers regarding youth-friendly social policy Ethnic minorities are more likely to be trapped in school disengagement, academic failure, and social exclusion under the current Hong Kong education system. Therefore, this systematic review aims to reveal research gaps which may help scholars focus on ethnic minority students' protective resources which may be useful for policy makers to design programs targeting academic integrity and social inclusion. A systematic review of available literature was carried out based on peer-reviewed articles published in English using PubMed, Ovid, EBSCO HOST, ERIC, ProQuest databases, Google scholar, and hand searching. Sixty-four thousand and eight hundred and eleven articles were retrieved of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. Results demonstrate that the majority of existing studies (mostly compromised qualitative) solely examines the link between school sphere (teachers, Chinese language efficiency) and ethnic minority students based on problem-driven approach. However, it barely discusses the socio-ecological factors which may be beneficial for EM students to overcome school disengagement, perceived discrimination, and social exclusion regarding strength-based approach (resilience). Ultimately, findings highlight the potential importance of resilience approach which will benefit not only school staff and mental health professionals but also social policy makers to design youth-friendly programs in the long run.


Presenters
avatar for Gizem Arat

Gizem Arat

PhD candidate, The University of Hong Kong, Department of Social Work and Social Administration
I hold my MSW from the University of Pitstburgh, School of Social Work and worked as a social worker with at-risk youth. I am a second-year PhD student in the University of Hong Kong, Department of Social Work and Social Administration. My research area is ethnic minority youth's mental health and risk behaviors regarding the social-ecology of resilience in the Hong Kong context. I am very passionate to initiate social advocacy and suggest... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

A Validation Study of the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) scale with a French-Canadian Sample
Abstract #302
A Validation Study of the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) scale with a French-Canadian Sample
Presenter: Martine Hébert Co - Presenters:  Nathalie Parent, Caroline Simard, Odin Hjemdal
Abstract:
Resilience is a phenomenon reflecting positive adaptation despite the presence developmental threats such as adversity and trauma (Masten, 2001). It is particularly important for adolescents, thriving with developmental tasks of role and identity definition, who may be confronted with significant challenges and adverse life events. Although psychometrically sound measures are essential for theory development and clinical practice, measures of resilience in adolescence are scant. The Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) is a 28-item scale, declined in five dimensions: personal competence, social competence, structured style, family cohesion, and social resources (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen & Rosenvinge, 2006). The READ is a valid, reliable and practical instrument for resilience and risk prevention research. The present study aims at exploring the psychometric properties of the French Canadian version of the READ with a sample of 587 adolescents. The analysis of the psychometric properties of the translated scale includes exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, internal consistency and convergent validity. Confirmatory factor analysis supports the five-factor structure of the scale. Internal consistency score are found to be satisfactory, ranging from .69 (Structured style) to .92 (Family cohesion). Convergent validity of score from the READ is established by significant relationships with score from life satisfaction and self-esteem scales.

Presenters
MH

Martine Hébert

Martine Hébert (Ph.D. in psychology) is professor at the sexology department of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She has training in child development and child clinical psychology as well as a strong background in psychometry. In the past 25 years, her research interests have focused on the consequences associated with interpersonal trauma. She has published research papers documenting the diversity of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents, and particularly measuring protective factors. Developing research based direct measures of protective factors that captures essential protective resources is... Read More →
NP

Nathalie Parent

Psychologist - National University of Colombia | Master of Mental Health - University of Antioquia | Investigator and professor of the research line on resilience and positive development of the National School of Public Health at the University of Antioquia, coordinator of the observatory for the youth of the city of Medellin
CS

Caroline Simard

Caroline Simard, M.A. is a doctoral student in measurement and assessment in the Faculty of educational sciences, Université Laval, Canada. Her thesis aims at investigating the models of resilience and the salient constructs for the explanation of the phenomenon. Relying on a meta-analytic synthesis as well as data collection with a sample of university students, her thesis will contribute to theory development on the construct of... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Addressing Methodological and Theoretical Gaps in Researching Resilience and Wellbeing: a Capability Approach towards the Wellbeing of South Sudanese Refugee Youth in Uganda
Abstract #325
Addressing Methodological and Theoretical Gaps in Researching Resilience and Wellbeing: a Capability Approach towards the Wellbeing of South Sudanese Refugee Youth in Uganda
Presenter: Julie Schiltz
Abstract:
Research on the wellbeing of young refugees is increasingly shifting towards a resilience perspective. Yet, a lack of empirical evidence on trajectories of wellbeing and resilience of young refugees hampers the design of tailored interventions and sustainable support. This poster presentation outlines the design of an ongoing PhD study on the wellbeing and resilience of South Sudanese refugee youth in northern Uganda. The study adopts a Capability Approach to address methodological aspects, theoretical underpinnings and contextual embeddedness of current empirical studies on the wellbeing of refugee youth. The Capability Approach is a normative framework to evaluate and assess wellbeing and social arrangements, with an explicit focus on the design of policies, and proposals about social change in society. More specifically, the study explores ‘capabilities’ or freedoms that refugee youth deem valuable in their lives, and the opportunities and barriers they experience in the pursuit of their wellbeing. The study adopts an ecological, multifaceted and strengths-based perspective to study wellbeing and resilience of refugee youth, and thereby seeks for an alternative to common individualizing and western-based approaches in refugee literature that focuses excessively on trauma and victimhood. The longitudinal mixed method research design including community based research approaches aims to make this study more contextually valid, empowering and relevant for all stakeholders involved.     

Presenters
JS

Julie Schiltz

Julie is a PhD student at the department of Special Education at Ghent University (Belgium) and is affiliated to the Centre for Children in Vulnerable Situations (CCVS) as a researcher. She studied Educational Sciences and Conflict and Development Studies at Ghent University. She carried out an 8-month internship at the psychosocial support centre of CCVS in northern Uganda, where she also conducted research on the social reintegration of... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Addressing Processes Before Outcomes: Designing Effective Interventions To Improve Academic Outcomes For Children In Foster Care
Abstract #280
Addressing Processes Before Outcomes: Designing Effective Interventions to Improve Academic Outcomes for Children in Foster Care
Presenter: Jaime Wegner-Lohin  
Abstract:
In order to be more effective, interventions designed to improve academic outcomes for children in foster care must address the processes that lead to improved education outcomes. Child maltreatment has a number of negative consequences on both the neurodevelopmental and attachment processes of the developing child, which contribute to difficulty with skills required to learn in the classroom. A review of the empirical literature was completed on processes and interventions associated with improved education outcomes for maltreated children. Findings suggest a number of processes that contribute to improved academic outcomes following maltreatment including self-regulation, executive functioning, and social competency. In contrast, the majority of existing interventions focus on improving reading and math scores and fail to address the underlying processes associated with improved functioning in the classroom. This presentation advocates the need to refocus interventions to target the processes associated with improved educational outcomes prior to focusing on academic achievement. Further, the need to simultaneously address systemic issues within child welfare and education practice, policy and research will also be discussed as a means to improve education outcomes for children in foster care.

Presenters
avatar for Jaime Wegner-Lohin

Jaime Wegner-Lohin

McGill University - School of Social Work
Jaime Wegner-Lohin is a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Work at McGill Universxity.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Child Labor And Resilience In The Perspective Of Families With Work History
Abstract #314
Child Labour and Resilience in the Perspective of Families with Work History
Presenter: Aline Mantovani
Abstract:
Work is a social, cultural, historical and political phenomenon that affects children and adolescents worldwide and develops employees in different meanings, sometimes positive, sometimes negative. Therefore, this study aims to draw some reflections on resilience from the perspective of adults who had an early involvement in labor activities, seeking to understand their life histories and social mechanisms that produce evaluative discourse and/or critical of the forms of work developed as children and/or adolescents. Such a problem has been addressed through the use of questionnaires, interviews and photographs from the four research participants and presented from a historical analysis of the emergence of child labor, national and international legal provisions and the different points of view regarding their families characterization in our society. The results point to the multiplicity of meanings attributed to child labor, coming by risk factors related to schooling and health care and/or protection related to social, emotional, and economic development. Cultural and community aspects observed in the data collected in support for understanding the development and demonstration of resilience in the lives of individuals.

Presenters
AM

Aline Mantovani

Educator, graduated from Universidade Estadual Paulista - Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCT/UNESP) in 2008. Master in Education from this university in 2012 and a doctoral student in the Graduate Course in Education also by FCT/UNESP, focusing on child labor and resilience in adults with histories of early labor. Operates mainly in the following areas: child labor, children and adolescents at risk, family, education professionals, social... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Children of African Origins Displaying Resilence in Berlin
Abstract #318
Children of African Origins Displaying Resilence in Berlin 
Presenter: Tricia Morrison/Isichei
Abstract:
Currently, I’m enrolled in the Master’s program Childhood Studies and Children’s Rights at Free University Berlin Germany. I’m presently in the process of writing my Master’s Thesis on the Topic of Resilience. The research will focus on Resilience displayed by Children of African Descent/Migration Background living in Berlin Germany. The Target Group is 10-20 children of African origins living in Berlin for at least 5 years within the age range of 10-19 years. The Grounded Theory research technique along with a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods will be used to collect and analyze data. However, expertise knowledge of the Resilience Research Centre available through the RRC Evaluation Tool Basket and previous studies done by the Centre will be used as a guideline and a point of reference throughout the entire research project. Within the framework that, “…resilience is both the capacity of individuals to navigate their way to the psychological, social, cultural, and physical resources that sustain their well-being, and their capacity individually and collectively to negotiate for these resources to be provided in culturally meaningful ways” ( Ungar: 2008), it is my intention to present the research findings as a Paper Presentation.

Presenters
TI

Tricia Isichei

Im a teacher from Jamaica W.I. who migrated to Berlin 3 years ago. Where Im currently doing a Masters in Childhood Studies and Children's Rights. Within the field of Children’s Rights there is a discourse of representing children from Africa and children with African origins as inactive objects. It is my opinion that this discourse continues to prevail because it maintains the status quo and fails to question deep rooted ideologies that cause... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

CYRM-28: Translation And Cultural Adaptation In Spain
Abstract #311
CYRM-28: Translation and Cultural Adaptation in Spain 
Presenter: Maria Llistosella Piñero Co - Presenter: Angela Bejarano 
Abstract:
Resilience, CYRM-28, Spain, translation, cultural adaptationIn 1012, we were the translation and cultural adaptation of the CYRM-28 scale in Spain. With a sample of 340 adolescents in the District of San Lorenzo, in Terrassa, identified as vulnerable and at risk of exclusion, using the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin statistician for suitability and Barlett, which it was significant testing. We were an exploratory factor analysis of principal components with oblique rotation Oblimin with Kaiser. The 28 initial items, four were discarded for not saturate in any factor and found two conflicting items. Three components were identified: family interaction, explaining 17.7% of variance; Interaction with others with a 7.17% and skills or individual resources with 6%. We found the need to explore and to reformulate the expression of items 22, 1, 3, 9 as well as the conflicting 19, 23. Later, in 2013, we were a qualitative study through structured interviews with 10 young people aged between 14 and 19 years, identified by 5 experts, such as resilient. We discussed the resources that facilitate the process of resilience, creating 13 new items to take into consideration in Spanish population, as well as the reformulation of the 5 items listed above. This year we will do the CYRM-28 Spain validation.

Presenters
ML

Maria Llistosella Piñero

Maria Llistosella Piñero, native of Barcelona, 32 years old. Ten years of experience how nurse pediatric and community, working in a primary care center. Associate Professor of the "Escola Universitària d'Infermeria and therapy Ocupasional of Terrassa, attached to the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona". Graduate College of nursing in the year 2003, Master in primary health care, 2006; Postgraduate course in basic and community nutrition... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Angela Bejarano

Angela Bejarano

Psychologist, Social Integration Secretariat- LGBT affairs
Psychologist and psychotherapist working for the Gender and Sexual Diversity Center (Public Policy for the Full Guarantee of the LGBTI Rights). Interested in the social and clinical scope and passionate to work with vulnerable populations and program interventions. Convinced that awareness, acceptance and empowerment are some of the few ways to self and community transformation.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Development Of A Structured Support Programme To Enhance Resilience In Parents Of Children With Complex Health Needs: A Mixed Methods Participatory Action Study
Abstract #317
Development of a Structured Support Programme to Enhance Resilience in Parents of Children with Complex Health Needs: a Mixed Methods Participatory Action Study
Presenter: Sharon McCloskey  
Abstract:
Caring for children with complex healthcare needs places parents under additional strains compared to other parents with regard to their physical and emotional health, relationships and economic welfare. Yet great variation exists in how parents and families facing similar circumstances cope, with some exhibiting negative consequences of caring while others cope well and thrive. How families cope is linked to resilience. Research confirms the potential for resilience to be enhanced and group based interventions are one approach through which this may be promoted. This poster will outline the work undertaken to develop a programme with this group of parents (phase 1 of a 2 part study). A pragmatic research design was applied with adherence to the main principles and social justice goals of transformative research. The programme was developed through an iterative series of workshops and focus groups with parents which explored the demands they experience, what helps them to cope and what they would consider helpful in a programme. Their views have been linked with existing theory and research outcomes to develop a programme which takes account of the research evidence but has been shaped by the population it seeks to help. It will be tested in phase 2.

Presenters
SM

Sharon McCloskey

Sharon McCloskey is a registered nurse. She has worked in the field of children's palliative care and supported children with complex health needs and their families for 20 years. She is particularly interested in factors that help build resilience in parents and families of children with complex health needs and is currently completing a PhD intervention study to develop and test the feasibility of a structured support programme to enhance... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Drawing Peace: Discourse Analysis Of Former Child Soldiers In Post-Conflict Situations
Abstract #274
Drawing Peace: Discourse Analysis of Former Child Soldiers in Post-Conflict Situations
Presenter: Eliza Martinelli  
Abstract:
The research discourses upon the social reintegration of former child soldiers in post-conflict, as resilience processes, in view of the obstacles of the United Nations Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration program (DDR) aimed at youngsters involved in armed groups. Thus, under the theoretical perspective of the Peace Studies, study developed at the University of Innsbruck (Austria), it is intended to analyze the deficiencies of the DDR program, whose bases are adaptations of a former pre-existent program for former adult soldiers and deal with a universalistic conception of childhood. It is necessary to acknowledge the specificities of former child soldiers at the time of social reinsertion, integrating the community in peacebuilding in conformity with its sociocultural values, besides highlighting the essential role of caregivers in the recovery of youngsters in post-conflict. Moreover, former child soldiers’ testimonials will be studied using the French strand of Discourse Analysis, to give voice to the youngsters and translate their real needs. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the obstacles of the DDR program aimed at former child soldiers under the Peace Studies’ view along with Discourse Analysis, highlighting the importance of the former child soldiers community (reinsertion target) seen as protective factors.

Presenters
avatar for Eliza Martinelli

Eliza Martinelli

Undergraduate student of International Relations, São Paulo State University
I am an undergraduate last year student of International Relations at Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp- São Paulo, Brazil). Since 2012, I have been engaged in an extension project group at the university, in which I am an educator sharing knowledge and reflections with young students from a high school. Besides, I was an academic exchange student with a scholarship during the second semester of 2013 at Universidade de Santiago de Compostela... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Dynamics Of Resilience In Forced Migration: A One-Year Follow-Up Study Of Longitudinal Associations With Mental Health In A Conflict-Affected Population.
Abstract #328
Dynamics of Resilience in Forced Migration: A One-Year Follow-Up Study of Longitudinal Associations With Mental Health in a Conflict-Affected Population
Presenter: Chesmal Siriwardhana  
Abstract:
Background: The concept of ‘resilience’ is of increasing interest in mental health studies in populations facing adversity. The stability of resilience levels and its associations with socio-demographic and mental health exposures were investigated in a conflict-affected, internal-migrant population.Methods: A follow-up study was conducted among Muslims displaced by conflict from Northern Sri Lanka 20 years ago but currently considering return migration. Of 450 participants interviewed at baseline in 2011, 338 (75.1%) were re-interviewed in 2012. Resilience was measured on both occasions using the 14-item Resilience Scale (RS-14), and common mental disorders using the Patient Health Questionnaire.Results: The mean resilience scores of the sample were 80.2 (95%CI 78.6-81.9) at baseline and 84.9 (83.5-86.3) at follow-up. At both time-points, lower resilience was independently associated with food insecurity, lower social support availability and social isolation. At both time-points, there were significant associations with CMD in unadjusted analyses, but the role of social confounders differed, only showing independence at baseline. Resilience was not associated with either incidence or maintenance of CMD over the follow-up period. Conclusion: In this displaced population facing a potential reduction in adversity, resilience was more strongly and robustly associated with economic/social factors than with the presence of mental disorder.

Presenters
CS

Chesmal Siriwardhana

Dr. Chesmal Siriwardhana is medical doctor by training and currently a Senior Lecturer in Public Health at the Faculty of Medical Science, Anglia Ruskin University, UK. He is also a visiting researcher at the Centre for Global Mental Health, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. His research interests are in migration and mental health, resilience, bioethics and disaster-research ethics. He currently leads a research group on... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Enhancement Of Resilience For Socially Disadvantaged Elementary School Children Through The Mentoring Program Baloo And You
Abstract #307
Enhancement of Resilience for Socially Disadvantaged Elementary School Children Through the Mentoring Program Baloo and You
Presenter: Wassilis Kassis Co-Presenter: Sibylle Drexler
Abstract:
Questionnaire data, collected in 2009, from a cross-sectional study of a randomly selected sample of 5,149 8th graders from four EU-countries (Austria, Germany, Slovenia, and Spain) was used to explore the effects of family violence on resilient adolescents.Our central question was: Is a positive resilience status (being non-violent/non-depressive despite experiencing family violence) a sufficient indicator for positive social and personal development? To answer this question we computed participants’ average protective and risk factors scores and used variance analyses to compare the means of the specific protective and risk factors of resilient adolescents who had experienced family violence with those who had not.We found that a positive resilience status is not sufficient for positive social and personal development. Resilient students who had been exposed to family violence showed significantly higher levels of social and personal risks and lower levels of social and personal protective characteristics than students without family violence experiences. These findings indicate that despite a positive resilience status, the higher the experienced level of violence family, the higher the risk characteristics and the lower the protective characteristics, even for resilient students, such that high levels of family violence “wash out” young people’s chances of positive development.

Presenters
WK

Wassilis Kassis

Wassilis Kassis, PhD, holds a Full Professorial Chair for Educational Science at the University Osnabrück/Germany. For more than 20 years, Kassis develops and coordinates projects of research on the social development of young adults within the context of family and school at national and international level. His main focus of research and teaching is dedicated to the particular resilience processes of adolescents with special attention to... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SD

Sibylle Drexler

After graduating with honors in sociology from the University of Bamberg, Germany in 2007, I began working as a research assistant at the european forum for migration studies (efms, Bamberg, Germany) analyzing a special tuition project for children from immigrant families. In 2009, I accepted a position at the University of Osnabrück (Osnabrück, Germany) evaluating potentially positive effects of the mentoring program Baloo and You on... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Evaluating Multi-Sector Collaboration to Promote Resilience
Abstract #301
 Evaluating Multi-Sector Collaboration to Promote Resilience
Presenter: Judy Gillespie
Abstract:
Multi-sector collaborations, with their capacity for boundary spanning communication, cooperation, and coordination, can promote resilience for at-risk children/youth, and families, increasing inclusion and access to resources. But such collaborations are difficult to establish and sustain. They require considerable commitment of time and resources. Participants and funders must perceive value for their investment, rendering evidence of impacts and outcomes increasingly important. Yet, conventional evaluation tools appear to have limited capacity to assist in the development of this evidence. Are multi-sector collaborations simply too messy, too unruly to be tamed by scientific methods of research and evaluation? Or, do we require more creative approaches to evaluation design, perhaps even to the kinds of evidence we are seeking to obtain? How might critical and participatory epistemologies assist in this endeavor? Using the example of multi-sector collaboration to address Aboriginal well-being, this presentation examines the challenges of evaluating their impacts and outcomes while highlighting promising approaches. Participants will be invited to consider and respond to the above questions through their own experience and insights. The presentation is intended to be part of a larger discussion concerning evaluation of community interventions that will be of interest to community practitioners, policy-makers, funders, and researchers.

Presenters
JG

Judy Gillespie

Dr. Gillespie is currently the Acting Director of the School of Social Work at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus. Prior to obtaining her PhD, she worked for many years in children’s services in northwestern Alberta. Her research interests encompass the role of communities in the welfare of children with a particular focus on policy frameworks that strengthen the community level social, physical, and political... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Evaluation Of The Day Treatment Program: A Holistic Approach To Education And Intervention In The Early Years
Abstract #288
Evaluation of the Day Treatment Program: A Holistic Approach to Education and Intervention in the Early Years
Presenter: Angela Lenis Co - Presenter: Julie Gamboz  
Abstract:
The following report examines the outcomes of an early years intervention known as the Day Treatment Program. This program, located at Adventure Place, a children’s mental health agency in Toronto, Canada, serves children between the ages of 4 and 7 years, with moderate to severe needs. Children are treated by teachers and teacher-therapists, as well as a multi-disciplinary team, including social work, speech and language, psychological, and in-home support services. The agency employs a strength-based approach to intervention, focusing on family strengths to promote family engagement, increase child functioning, and overall family resiliency. Using a quantitative design, this evaluation investigated 8 key questions related to program goals. Findings suggest that the program is improving overall child and family functioning, particularly in the areas of children’s coping skills and caregiver advocacy and knowledge. These findings could help inform other community agencies on effective practices around treatment for children and families, as well as in completing successful evaluation projects in local community settings. This abstract is being submitted for a poster presentation.

Presenters
AL

Angela Lenis

Evaluation Coordinator, Adventure Place
Angela Lenis is the Evaluation Coordinator at Adventure Place, a children's mental health agency in Toronto. Angela has a Master of Arts in Child Study and Education from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, as well as an Honours Bachelor of Arts degree in Early Childhood Education. Along with her work in research and program evaluation, Angela works as an Occasional Teacher with the Toronto District School... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JG

Julie Gamboz

Psychometrist at Adventure Place | Julie Gamboz is a Psycho-Educational Consultant at Adventure Place, where she provides assessment and consultation services to children involved with the agency. Julie also oversees many of the agency's evaluation initiatives. She received her Master's degree in Psychology from Columbia University.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Factors Associated With Resilience In Youths: A Population Study In Medellín, Colombia
Abstract #320
Factors Associated with Resilience in Youths: A Population Study in Medellín, Colombia
Presenter: Alexandra Restrepo Co - Presenter: Nilton Montoya  
Abstract:
Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of protective factors and risk factors to which resilient youths, youths who engage in severely aggressive behaviors, and those who engage in other risk behaviors (i.e., drugs and sex) are exposed. Methods: Cross-sectional study with a representative sample of persons between 12 and 60 years of age from Medellín and the Metropolitan Area of the Aburrá Valley (n=4654). Probabilistic multistage study. Youths between 14 and 26 years of age were selected for this analysis (n=1780). Results: Resilient youths are twice as numerous as severe aggressors and have a greater probability of confiding in family members to solve their problems, are the subjects of greater vigilance by their mothers in childhood, and are more likely to report crimes to the authorities and to resolve conflicts by nonviolent means when a family member has been hurt. Family structure, school characteristics, and neighborhood characteristics do not seem to be as associated with resilience as family functionality, especially parenting style. Conclusions: The high proportion of resilient youths obliges us to redirect public policies for the tertiary prevention of violence to emphasize promoting resilient behaviors and the positive development of children and youths.

Presenters
AR

Alexandra Restrepo

Professor, university of Antioquia
Alexandra Restrepo, MD, MSci, Faculty member, University of Antioquia, Colombia. Director of Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Restrepo has conduct different research about violence and resilience in Medellin Colombia.. She has designed and evaluated different programs to promote early child positive develop and prevent violence.

Co-Presenters
NM

Nilton Montoya

Statistician at University of Antioquia | Nilton E. Montoya, BA. Specialist in Data base management and master in software Engineer. University of Antioquia, Colombia. Life risk behaviors prevention program –PREVIVA-. Professor Montoya has develop different research about violence and he has published in different international and national journals.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Fostering Resilience Among Gay And Bisexual Boys: Risk And Protective Factors For HIV Risk Behaviours
Abstract #322
Fostering Resilience Among Gay and Bisexual Boys: Risk and Protective Factors for HIV Risk Behaviours
Presenter: Elizabeth Saewyc Co - Presenters: Yuko Homma, Jacqueline Gahagan, Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost, Gilbert Emond  
Abstract:
Gay and bisexual (GB) men are severely affected by HIV. Although the HIV rate is low among adolescents, GB boys are at higher risk for behaviours that can lead to HIV vs. heterosexual boys. We examined risk and protective factors for HIV risk behaviours among GB boys in British Columbia using the 2008 BC Adolescent Health Survey. The sample was 279 self-identified GB boys. HIV risk index scores were computed by summing eight items (e.g., unprotected intercourse, injected drug use). Examples of risk factors included violence exposure, sexual orientation-based discrimination, and history of government care. Protective factors were family connectedness, school connectedness, peer attitudes towards risk behaviours, and weekly involvement in extracurricular activities. We also tested whether a protective factor moderated the effect of risk factors on HIV risk behaviours. Multiple linear regression models identified violence exposure, discrimination, and ever being in government care as risk factors, and school connectedness and peer anti-risk attitudes as protective factors. We found moderation effects; for example, stronger school connectedness decreased HIV risk particularly among GB boys with sexual violence histories. Developing supportive school environments and promoting healthy peer norms about risk behaviours may foster resilience among GB boys even in face of stigma.

Presenters
ES

Elizabeth Saewyc

A Professor of Nursing and Adolescent Medicine at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Dr. Saewyc heads the interdisciplinary Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre. She is a Fellow in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Her research and clinical practice primarily focus on how stigma, violence, and trauma influence young people’s health, coping, and behaviour, and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DB

Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost

Assistant Professor at Department Sexologie, Université du Québec à Montréal | Dominic is a co-author, not a co-presenter, he will not be attending the conference. If you need a bio for him, please let me know, and I will submit it.
GE

Gilbert Emond

Associate Professor at Applied Human Sciences, Concordia University
JG

Jacqueline Gahagan

Professor/Director at Gender and Health Promotion Studies Unit, School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University | Jacqueline Gahagan is a Full Professor of Health Promotion, the Director of the Gender and Health Promotion Studies unit and Head of the Health Promotion Division in the School of Health and Human Performance in the Faculty of Health Professions at Dalhou
YH

Yuko Homma

Postdoctoral Fellow at Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre, School of Nursing, University of British Columbia


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

From Stress To Challenge: Supporting Parents During The Transition Of Their ADHD Child To High School
Abstract #277
From Stress to Challenge: Supporting Parents During the Transition of Their ADHD Child to High School
Presenter: Sylvie Normandeau Co - Presenters: Lily Hechtman, Jessica Vaillancourt, Julie Girard-Lapointe, Julie Allard  
Abstract:
Parents' major concerns about their ADHD child's transition to high school are their child's capacity to cope with the higher academic demands and their own ability to adjust their supervision of homework. This paper assesses the impact of a program to support academic skills of ADHD children during the transition to high school, on parental stress. Families were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group. Parents completed the Stress index for parents of adolescents (Sheras et al, 1998) at pretest and posttest. They also reported on the child's improvement in organizational and learning strategies at posttest. Following the intervention, parents expressed less stress about their adolescent's emotional reactions, and interpersonal development. They expressed fewer difficulties in coping with their responsibilities of parenting, more satisfaction in the relationship with their spouse, and more confidence in their ability to cope effectively with their adolescent. Furthermore, they observed improvement in their adolescent's organizational skills: attention, task initiation, planning and prioritization, organization of space and schedule, time management, perseverance. These preliminary findings suggest that parents became more resourceful in meeting future challenges, developed a more positive view of themselves and their child as a result of their participation to the program.

Presenters
SN

Sylvie Normandeau

Sylvie Normandeau is full professor at the Université de Montréal and scientific director at Centre jeunesse de Montréal, Institut universitaire (child protection services). Over the years she has been involved in the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention or treatment programs for vulnerable or at-risk parents and children.

Co-Presenters
JA

Julie Allard

Research coordinator at Univesité de Montréal | Julie Allard is a psychoeducator. She coordinates research programs at the Université de Montréal. She was involved in the development of the Trasition program for ADHD children and the parents.
JG

Julie Girard-Lapointe

Graduate Student at Université de Montréal | Julie Girard-Lapoint is a doctoral student in the school of psychoeducation at the Université de Montréal. She has been involved in community services for ADHD children. She participed in the Transition program for ADHD children and their parents.
LH

Lily Hechtman

Psychiatrist at Montreal's Children Hospital | Lily Hechtman is child psychiatrist in the deparment of psychiatry and pediatrics at Montreal's Chldren's Hospital. She is recognized for her research and expertise in the treatment of ADHD children, adolescents and adults.
JV

Jessica Vaillancourt

Research coordinator at Université de Montréal | Jessica Vaillancourt is a psychoeducator. Over the last few years ahe has coordinated research programs and participated in the development of the Transition program for ADHD children and their parents.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Going To University As A Marker Of Young Carers’ Resiliency: An Exploration Of The Resiliency Process
Abstract #300
Going to University as a Marker of Young Carers’ Rsiliency: An Exploration of the Resiliency Process 
Presenter: Rebecca Enright
Abstract:
Young carers (YCs) are an understudied group of children and youth who care for family members with illnesses, disabilities or mental health issues (Aldridge & Becker, 1993). Research has identified negative developmental impacts of caregiving within emotional, psychological, social and academic domains (for a review, see Sahoo & Suar’s, 2009). Despite potential negative outcomes, some YCs succeed at post-secondary education, suggesting resiliency. The present study aims to determine protective factors that contributed to a YCs academic success and to determine how the resiliency process has been experienced from the YC perspective. This study is based on Masten’s (2007) “Short List” of resiliency correlates and explores how protective factors interact within multilevel systems (e.g., individual, behavioural, social) within the context of being a YC. Through semi-structured interviews, the experiences of ten female and male YCs who are currently university students are explored. Data will be inductively analysed to identify emerging themes related to the YCs experience of the processes of resiliency within the multilevel systems. Results will be discussed from an individual, behavioural and social perspective. Results may help community agencies to design YC programs which enhance protective factors within different systems.

Presenters
RE

Rebecca Enright

Rebecca Enright is a fourth year undergraduate student at Brock University, studying Honours Child and Youth Studies and Concurrent Education. Rebecca’s interest in resiliency first occurred when she travelled to Namibia, Africa in 2013 to study childhood resiliency in an international context with Professor Heather Chalmers as a field course. From that experience, Rebecca decided to pursue her individual thesis option for her final year to... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

How War Changes Parenting Ideas And Practices: The Views Of Elders Living In Post-Conflict Northern Uganda
Abtract #299

How War Changes Parenting Ideas And Practices: The Views Of Elders Living In Post-Conflict Northern Uganda
Presenter: Leen De Nutte
Studies on resilience and adversity have indicated the importance of parenting as a protective process for children in a context of (past) collective violence. However, little is known regarding the way parenting potentially changes following such violence. Therefore, this study explored parental beliefs and parenting practices through interviews (n=9) and focus groups (n=12 groups of 8 participants) with elders in Kitgum district, Northern Uganda. This area has been affected by collective violence which resulted out of the conflict between the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Ugandan government. Using a Constructivist Grounded Theory approach, it appeared that parenting has changed in divergent ways. First, particular parenting practices, such as fireplace teachings, were difficult to uphold during the war, since there was no time, space or opportunity to do so. Second, parenting is now much more seen as an individual responsibility which is juxtaposed to its collective responsibility in the past. Third, this study revealed a shift in traditional gender roles of parents. Practice and policy should take into account these changes in parenting with regard to the provision of context-sensitive interventions to support the process of resilience for both children and parents in the aftermath of collective violence.


Presenters
LD

Leen De Nutte

Leen obtained her master's degree in Educational Sciences (option Special Education) at Ghent University in 2013. She wrote her qualitative dissertation on supportive relationships and social support among war-affected adolescents who attended the Gulu Mental Health Unit in Northern Uganda. Also, she did her internship at the CCVS centre in Lira, Uganda, which provides psychosocial support to war-affected children and their families. Since... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Including Youth In The Development Of A Community-Based Research Project Examining Everyday Resilience In The Context Of Sexual Health And Structural Violence
Abstract #329
Including Youth in the Development of a Community-Based Research Project Examining Everyday Resilience in the Context of Sexual Health and Structural Violence 
Presenter: Eliana Suarez
Abstract: 
Resilience remains a generally underexplored area in the study of violence and health. Specifically in sexual health, the social consequences of HIV, particularly stigma and discrimination, should be addressed with clarity, using comprehensive conceptual frameworks of resilience. This paper reports on the process of including knowledge users in the development of a locally-informed, long-term research project examining HIV/STI prevention priorities as well as the intersections of resilience, HIV stigma, sexual violence, poverty and other indicators of structural violence among key populations of Peruvian youth in two different regions ( Lima and Ayacucho). Cultural differences in beliefs regarding sexuality and sexual health have been extensively noted; therefore the inclusion of two different cultural areas in Peru is essential to examine the unique context of everyday resilience among youth in both sites. Most importantly, resilience strategies may also be different, which indicates the need for distinct health policy and health promotion approaches for youth in these two locations. The contextual specificity and in-depth approach characteristic of community-based research have an important role to play in global health research and resilience studies.

Presenters
ES

Eliana Suarez

Dr. Eliana Suarez, is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Social Work at Wilfrid Laurier University since 2011. She has an MSW and a PhD in Social Work from the University of Toronto. She has extensive experience in community mental health, specifically the nexus of trauma, resilience, and mental health. Her research examines social perceptions of violence, the health consequences of such violence and the tools survivors of violence use to... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Individuals As Community Assets: Resilience And Hope In Community-Based Leaders Of Peru
Abstract # 276:
Individuals As Community Assets: Resilience And Hope In Community-Based Leaders Of Peru
Presenter: Roxanna Morote
Abstract:
Poverty and social violence have negative impacts on psychosocial well-being. However, in spite of living in social exclusion, community-based leaders improve their living conditions and become social caregivers. We explored if community-based leaders have higher levels of individual resilience and hope, and better indicators of emotional well-being. We compared college students (n = 323), non-organized adults (n = 202), and community-based leaders (n = 167) evaluated with the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA), the Herth Hope Scale (HHS) and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (HSCL-25). Community leaders show higher levels of interpersonal competences and resources, positive self-evaluation and efficacy (RSA), as well as social and global aspects of hope (HHS). However, they show not better indices of emotional well-being (HHS hopelessness, HSCL anxiety or depression). In the three groups compared, low resilience is a significant risk for anxiety and depression (HSCL > 1,75), specially for women. Leadership and gender have significant main effects on the development of RSA social competences and resources (Factorial ANOVAs). In conclusion, leaders show outstanding resources but they are still vulnerable to emotional distress, thus community interventions should acknowledge both their strengths and vulnerabilities. Resilience research may connect individual and community assets through the study of social leadership.

Presenters
RM

Roxanna Morote Rios

Assistant Professor of the Department of Psychology and Graduate School (Ma. in Community Psychology) in the Catholic University of Peru. PhD in Psychology (University of Leuven, Belgium) and Ma. in Gender and Ethnicity (Utrecht University, The Netherlands). My current research focuses on protective mechanisms of adults living in psychosocial disadvantage, mainly on women and community leaders (in resilience, hope, hopelessness, stressful life... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Innate And Extrinsic Resilience As A Motivational Driving Force
Abstract #278
Innate and Extrinsic Resilience as a Motivational Driving Force
Presenter: Glenn Richardson
Abstract:
The two key resilient experiences to thrive through adversity and challenge include an understanding of the resilient journey or resiliency mapping and the other is to discover innate core and common motivational energy centers within each person, family and organization that will facilitate resilient reintegration. This program will focus on the second experience of discovering innate resilience. The resilience drives that will be discussed include: 1. Essential Resilience as the sensitivity to listen to body messages that guide intuitive movement, eating, and sleep.2. Intellectual Resilience as the drive to understand, to discern, and to resolve.3. Childlike Resilience as the drive to enjoy life through adventure, play, and humor.4. Character Resilience as the drive to be free from guilt by living within a chosen character code.5. Noble Resilience as the drive to feel self-worth through the mechanism of altruism.6. Ecological Resilience as the drive to be enriched from one’s ecosystem (nature, music, animals, people). 7. Universal Resilience is the drive to receive insights and energy from sources beyond normal cognitive capacities. Integrative health modalities can be used to access sources of strength from the collective unconscious, quanta, Qi, or theistic spirit depending upon one’s belief system.

Presenters
avatar for Glenn Richardson

Glenn Richardson

Professor, University of Utah
Glenn E. Richardson, Full Professor in the Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of is the author of the foundational “Resiliency Model” published in 1990 and “The Metatheory of Resilience and Resiliency” published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in 2002. He developed Resiliency Training Programs that have demonstrated efficacy with public school children, worksite employees, and people with diabetes. He has... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Participation Of Students With Intellectual Disabilities In Their Transition From School To Active Life
Abstract #315
Participation of Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Their Transition From School to Active Life
Presenter: Sarah Martin-Roy Co - Presenters: Francine Julien-Gauthier, Colette Jourdan-Ionescu
Abstract:
The transition from school to active life is a critical period for students with intellectual disabilities. When schooling ends, these students experience sudden changes, a reduction of services received, and they have difficult access to an active lifestyle. In this study, the transition is addressed with the ecological systems theory focused on resilience. This model aims to accentuate risk factors and the development of individual, familial, and environmental protection factors to support the individual during critical periods with an emphasis on the role of resilience tutors (Jourdan-Ionescu, 2001). The doctoral research aims to investigate the participation of students with intellectual disabilities in their transition from school to active life (knowing their views and participation in activities). The study will consist of individual interviews with students living with mild intellectual disabilities, a parent and a school worker, and the execution of instruments (The Resilience Scale (Wagnild & Young, 1993, adapted by Julien-Gauthier & al., 2012) and a social support network evaluation). Preliminary results will be presented and supported by data from a pilot project conducted with six students with intellectual disabilities in transition who have followed the approach of the Carte routière vers la vie adulte.

Presenters
avatar for Sarah Martin-Roy

Sarah Martin-Roy

Université Laval
Research assistant and student member for Consortium national de recherche sur l’intégration sociale (CNRIS) and Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES). Her research focuses on students (18-21 years old) with intellectual disabilities participation in their transition from school to active life. She is also interested in vocational development, socio-professional integration as well as issues related to... Read More →

Co-Presenters
CJ

Colette Jourdan-Ionescu

Professor at Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières | Colette Jourdan-Ionescu, Ph. D. is professor at the Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, researcher for the Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES) and the Scientific Council of the Association francophone psychology and psychopathology in children and adolescents. She led the Quebec Journal... Read More →
avatar for Francine Julien-Gauthier

Francine Julien-Gauthier

Professor in the Education Faculty, Université Laval
Professor at Université Laval, Francine Julien-Gauthier, Ph. D., is professor in the Education Faculty at Université Laval. Regular researcher for Centre de recherche et d’intervention sur la réussite scolaire (CRIRES), she conducts studies on the education of individuals with intellectual disabilities and social inclusion for optimal social participation. She is particularly interested with transition periods: from childcare to school and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Pathways to Resilience: Perspectives from the Guamanian Sign Language Community
Abstract #333
Pathways to Resilience: Perspectives from the Guamanian Sign Language Community
Presenter: Heather Grace Zimmerman
Abstract:
Marginalized groups tend to experience significant adversity throughout their lives related to deficit perspectives from groups in power. In spite of difficult circumstances some are remarkably resilient. The current mixed methods study interviewed hearing caregivers and Deaf adults on Guam, in order to understand how they think about success and resilience related to deaf people. A content analysis revealed that: 1) Resilience is employed in culturally and contextually specific ways; 2) To be seen as successful, one had to be better than the norm, as in other marginalized groups; 3) Related to hearing loss, caregivers reported that their deaf children had a strong intuitive sense that allowed them to compensate for being deaf; and 4) for the sampled Guamanians, communication either promoted or obstructed deaf individual’s success and resilience. Findings support previous resilience research and add to our understanding of indigenous and deaf ways of “doing well” despite adversity.

Presenters
avatar for Heather Grace Zimmerman

Heather Grace Zimmerman

PhD Candidate, Gallaudet University
Zimmerman has a bachelors in ASL/English interpreting and a masters in International Development with a focus of people with disabilities in Small Island Developing States. She is currently a doctorate student studying resilience in deaf children and youth. She is interested in the cultural contexts that foster academic and social success. Zimmerman is the co-founder and director of the Månha Project, culturally responsive summer initiatives... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Practitioner Resilience: The Contribution Of Professional Education
Abstract #310
Practitioner Resilience: The Contribution of Professional Education 
Presenter: Jörg Huber
Co-Presenter: Penny Lindley
Abstract:
The notion of ‘practitioner resilience’ is established within the literature. However, there is a lack of research examining the whole experience of student learning and the means by which this may enhance practitioner resilience. The research question underpinning this study was: How do student health visitors’ experiences in higher education and practice settings contribute to the development of their capacity to respond to the tensions between expectation and reality in their practice role? This presentation will share the study’s original contribution to the field through the development and application of a conceptual framework combining resilience and transformative learning theory to learning for practitioner resilience. The conceptual web of learning, depicting the complex process of development of practitioner resilience, supports a social theory of resilience. The study supports the contention that resilience can be learnt through professional education, contributing new knowledge regarding how this has been achieved during a course leading to a professional qualification. The study adds to the small volume of research carried out with students and contributes new insights into the development of resilience as part of a process of transformative learning.

Presenters
avatar for Jörg Huber

Jörg Huber

Professor of Health Sciences, University of Brighton
My presentation will discuss links between inequalities and achievements in educational settings, reviewing very brief interventions which allow young people to (i) negotiate the middle class culture of university, (ii) show resilience to stigma and (iii) adopt a 'growth mindset' which reduces the risk of poor emotional health. I will discuss the commonalities of these highly successful interventions which should be adapted for and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Predictors of Resilience Among High-Risk Mothers: Examining Individual, Interpersonal, and Community-level Factors
Abstract #305
Predictors of Resilience Among High-Risk Mothers: Examining Individual, Interpersonal, and Community-level Factors 
Presenter: Kathryn Howell Co - Presenters: Idia Thurston
Abstract:
Elevated rates of poverty and familial stressors among urban mothers heighten their risk for adversity, which may lead to increased psychopathology. Despite these potential challenges, a substantial percentage of high-risk women exhibit resilient functioning. Guided by social-ecological theory, this study examines the role of individual, interpersonal, and community-level factors in predicting resilience among mothers experiencing multiple adversities, including domestic violence, substance abuse, and severe medical illness. Participants included 45 female primary caregivers, aged 23-60 (M=37.9; SD=9.85). Sixty percent of participants had a yearly household income below $10,000 and 91% were African American. A hierarchical multiple regression model predicting resilience after controlling for individual (age and ethnic identity), interpersonal (spirituality and social support from friends and family), and community-level factors (community cohesion) was significant (F(6,32)=3.24, p=.013, R2=.38). In the final step of this model, higher resilience was associated with greater ethnic identity (β=.43; p=.016) and stronger support from friends and family (β=.35; p=.047). By identifying variables that can enhance resilience, this study offers unique insight into how the functioning of high-risk mothers may be improved at individual and interpersonal levels. Researchers and clinicians should consider these highly mutable factors when developing and implementing interventions for families experiencing adversity.

Presenters
KH

Kathryn Howell

Kathryn H. Howell, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Memphis. Her research centers on intervention development to enhance resilience among children exposed to potentially traumatic events, such as family violence and interpersonal loss. She examines pathways to risk and resilience in these children and their families. Dr. Howell has published over 35 journal articles and chapters on these... Read More →

Co-Presenters
IT

Idia Thurston

Assistant Professor at University of Memphis | Idia Thurston, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University of Memphis and adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UTHSC/Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. Dr. Thurston graduated from the University of South Florida in 2010.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Profiles of Connectedness: Processes of Growth and Resilience in Children with and without Cancer
Abstract #304
Profiles of Connectedness: Processes of Growth and Resilience in Children with and without Cancer
Presenter: Katianne Howard Sharp Co - Presenters: Victoria Willard, Yuko Okado, Rachel Tillery, Sarah Barnes, Alanna Long, Sean Phipps  
Abstract:
Children with cancer face numerous illness-related stressors, but demonstrate resilience via their low levels of posttraumatic stress (PTSS) and other distress symptoms, as well as perceptions of cancer-related positive growth. The present study examined whether profiles of connectedness to social and familial domains (e.g., peers, school, family, neighborhood) were related to resilience and growth, and tested whether these patterns differ for children with cancer versus healthy peers. Youth, aged 8-19 years, with cancer (n=153) and without (n=101), completed measures of connectedness, PTSS, and benefit-finding. Latent profile analysis revealed four distinct profiles: high connectedness across domains (45%); low connectedness across domains (6%); connectedness primarily to family (parents, siblings; 40%); and connectedness primarily to peers (9%). Presence or absence of cancer history did not predict profile membership; however, profiles differed on PTSS and benefit-finding. Children highly connected across domains displayed the lowest PTSS and highest benefit finding, with moderate PTSS/benefit-finding for the family and peer profiles. Findings support connectedness as a possible mechanism facilitating growth and resilience, with children diagnosed with cancer not appearing to experience diminished connectedness. As parent and peer profiles did not differentially predict PTSS/benefit-finding, children appear to experience the benefits of connectedness regardless of domain.

Presenters
KH

Katianne Howard Sharp

Katianne Howard Sharp, M.S. is a graduate student in the clinical psychology program at the University of Memphis where she has studied such topics as emotion socialization and children’s adjustment to stressful life events (e.g., IPV exposure, peer victimization). Katianne has also been engaged in research at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital with Sean Phipps, Ph.D. Under his supervision, she has examined stress, adjustment, and growth... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SB

Sarah Barnes

Graduate Student Research Assistant at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/University of Memphis | Sarah Barnes, B.A. is a graduate student in the clinical psychology program at the University of Memphis where she works with Kathryn Howell, Ph.D. studying resilience in children and families exposed to traumatic events.
AL

Alanna Long

Clinical Research Associate-III at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital | Alanna Long works with Sean Phipps, Ph.D. at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on a study examining the stress, adjustment, and growth responses of children with cancer.
YO

Yuko Okado

Postdoctoral Fellow at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital | Yuko Okado, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in psychology working with Sean Phipps, Ph.D. She earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the Pennsylvania State University, where she worked as a research assistant at its Prevention Research Center. She researches how children’s adaptation to adversity is influenced by their emotion regulation capacities and the affective... Read More →
SP

Sean Phipps

Member and Chair at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital | Sean Phipps, Ph.D. a Member and the Chair of the Psychology Department at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He studies psychological effects of bone marrow transplantation, and coping and adaptive styles in children facing serious illness.
RT

Rachel Tillery

Graduate Student Research Assistant at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/University of Memphis | Rachel Tillery, M.S. is a doctoral student at the University of Memphis. Her research interests include understanding psychosocial processes related to children's adjustment to stressful life events, particularly childhood illness.
VW

Victoria Willard

Research Associate, St. Jude Faculty at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital | Victoria Willard, Ph.D. is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Her research focuses on social outcomes in children with cancer, with particular interests in the impact of early insults on long-term outcomes, the interaction between social and neurocognitive functioning, and the influence of the... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Project Resilience: Preparing Youth to Make Healthy Responses to Traumatic Events
Abstract #286
Project Resilience: Preparing Youth to Make Healthy Responses to Traumatic Events
Presenter: Anthony Hill  
Abstract:
Depression and anxiety disorders are pervasive public health concerns. According to the Mental Health Association, more than 100,000 from the state of Delaware (USA), including youth, are affected by these illnesses annually. Youth who experience bullying, gang violence, domestic and intimate partner violence or any life alternating experience are vulnerable to depression, anxiety, feelings of loneliness and isolation. Project Resilience is a community based initiative and its goal is to provide youth in Southern Delaware (USA) with opportunities to learn how to develop coping skills and inner strength, and to utilize family and community resources in times of crises. Youth who participate in the program will understand how to make healthy responses to traumatic events and how to use inner strength and utilize family and community resources to address crises. To measure resilience, youth who participate in the Project Resilience workshops completed the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM) before and after the training. This presentation describes the components of Project Resilience, discusses key findings, and considers implications for practice and policy.

Presenters
AH

Anthony Hill

Dr. Anthony J. Hill is an associate professor in the Department of Social Work at Delaware State University. He earned his Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Social Work from Howard University. His undergraduate degree was earned from the George Washington University. Dr. Hill is a licensed clinical social worker in the District of Columbia and the state of Delaware. He is also a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Protective Factors in After-School Programs: A Case Study
Abstract #272
Protective Factors in After-School Programs: A Case Study
Presenter: Joshua Prior Co - Presenters: Daniela Zuzunaga , Tamara Kurz  
Abstract:
This project is a case study in the protective-factor promoting processes that take place in afterschool programs. Children growing up in low-income neighbourhoods face several risk factors that reduce the chances of a positive life outcome. When trying to break cycles of poverty and criminality, the scope of social programs available to at-risk children is varied. After school programs have been well researched in regards to the protective factors that they provide to at-risk children, and their abilities to enhance the future opportunities of said children. After-school programs in high-risk neighbourhoods derived from the desire to provide children with an environment that could deliver a caring milieu and positive social development. These community-building programs act as a catalyst for positive behaviour, resiliency and the amelioration of delinquent behaviours. This research regarding afterschool programs, which is its preliminary stages, seeks to understand the factors that play in providing a human service systems approach in a school setting, and how these factors create or increase resilience and protective factors. Furthermore, there is an emphasis in resilience as a result and by-product of grassroots community support, and the accessibility of the implementation of after-school programs as a means to create said resilience.

Presenters
JP

Josh Prior

Student at Vancouver Island University | Josh Prior is a 4th year Criminology student at Vancouver Island University. He has taken specific courses outside of the required courses that deal with long-term crime patters and analysing geographic information for the purposes of looking at criminal

Co-Presenters
TK

Tamara Kurz

MBA candidate at Vancouver Island University Tamara Kurz, an international student in Vancouver Island University’s (CA) and University of Hertfordshire’s (UK) double degree Master of Business Administration and Master of Science International Business program. Previously studied at the University of Applied Sciences Würzburg-Schweinfurt, Germany, and graduated with a Bachelor of Business Administration, with a research-based thesis on... Read More →
DZ

Daniela Zuzunaga

Daniela Zuzunaga is a 4th year Sociology student at Vancouver Island University. She has been involved with grassroots community organizing within Nanaimo, BC, and has been part of the board of Directors of a not for profit agency specializing in violence against women. Daniela has worked for organizations that focus on crisis intervention, domestic violence and multicultural integration. Her interests lie with merging theory with lived... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Protective Mechanisms As Moderators Of Relationship Between Risk And Behaviour Problems
Abstract #316
Protective Mechanisms as Moderators of Relationship Between Risk and Behaviour Problems
Presenter: Ivana Maurović Co-Presenter: Antonija Žižak
Abstract:
Adolescent in out-of-home care are facing high levels of risk to their development, both trough experiencing numerous of major life events as well as daily hassles. Nevertheless, majority of them (approximately 65%) don’t have any behaviour problems (Maurović, in press). The aim of this presentation is to identify which protective mechanisms (external and internal) serve as a moderators between risk (major life events and daily hassles) and behaviour problems; 2) to get to know the experience of resilient process of male and female adolescents that are assessed (by professionals) as resilient. Mix method approach was used. Quantitative date were gathered via self-assessment, with instruments: List of major life events, Daily hassles of adolescents in residential care (Maurović,2014), Resilience and youth development module (WestEd & CDE, 2000),Youth Self Report (Achenbach, 1991). Sample comprise whole population of adolescents aged 14 to 18, placed in 15 Children's homes in Croatia (N=228). Qualitative data were collected using in-depth interviews with 24 participants, age 14 to 21. Data will be analysed using hierarchical regression and thematic analysis, and mixed in the interpretation phase of research.

Presenters
IM

Ivana Maurović

Prof at Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation Sciences | Ivana Maurović is Research Assistant at Faculty of Education and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is in the process of finishing PhD thesis „Resilience of adolescent's in Children's homes in Croatia“. Her main scientific interest is researching resilience process of youth with behavior problems and creating interventions that will be matched to... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Reaching for the Stars: Investigating Educational Aspirations and Expectations within a Resilience Framework
Abstract #296
Reaching for the Stars: Investigating Educational Aspirations and Expectations within a Resilience Framework
Presenter: Laurie Chapin Co - Presenter: Daniella Zileski  
Abstract:
Early school-leaving, lack of educational attainment and inequalities in higher education are issues of concern for society. Inquiries into students’ educational aspirations and expectations may be the key to addressing these issues. Socioeconomic status is categorised as a risk, family resources are protective factors, and high aspirations and expectations are positive outcomes. The present research investigated the aspirations and expectations of 183 Australian secondary students aged 13-18. The Child and Youth Resilience Measure-28 (CYRM-28; Resilience Research Centre, 2008), was utilised for a culturally sensitive measure of parental support. University expectations were comparably lower than the university aspirations for students from of a lower socioeconomic status. This finding highlights an aspiration-expectation gap amongst these students. The lower socio-economic status students had greater aspirations and expectations for TAFE (technical education in Australia) and other studies. The higher socio-economic status students had greater aspirations and expectations for university. As was anticipated all the family variables and university aspirations were predicted by parental educational aspirations and expectations, and parental support. Significant predictors for university expectations were parental expectations and parental support. The implications of these findings for interventions and directions for further investigations are discussed.

Presenters
avatar for Laurie Chapin

Laurie Chapin

Lecturer, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia
Laurie A. Chapin, PhD is a psychology lecturer at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. She received her PhD in psychology from Colorado State University in 2010. Her research interests include studying resilience of vulnerable youth with a focus on cultural factors. Previous research interests were with Mexican boys and positive educational outcomes. Since moving to Australia in 2011 she has turned her attention to beginning to study... Read More →

Co-Presenters
DZ

Daniella Zileski

Daniella Zileski completed her honours degree in psychology in 2013. Her thesis topic was resilience and educational expectations and aspirations among Australian youth. As the top student at Victoria University, she was awarded the APS Prize from the Australian Psychological Society.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Redefining Success: How Might The Perspectives Of Practitioners And Youth Inform The Evaluation Of Youth Job-Training Programs?
Abstract #282
Redefining Success: How Might the Perspectives of Practitioners and Youth Inform the Evaluation of Youth Job-Training Programs?
Presenter: Skye Allmang
Abstract:
Federally-funded youth job-training programs in the United States have undergone extensive evaluation since their creation in the 1960s. However, much remains to be learned regarding how these programs operate and what outcomes are achieved. Little has been documented on the practitioners’ or the youth’s perspectives of current evaluation practices, and whether they feel that evaluations have accurately represented their experiences with these job-training programs. This poster will highlight initial findings on practitioners’ perspectives on the evaluation of youth job-training programs, based on interviews conducted in the summer of 2014. Practitioners were asked to provide feedback based on their previous experiences with evaluation. They were also asked how their program defines success, and how that definition fits with their own definitions of success. Preliminary findings suggest that practitioners define success beyond whether or not youth experienced a change in earnings.The poster will outline next steps to be taken in the research process, including plans for interviewing youth participants, as well as ways in which information from the perspectives of practitioners and youth may be used to inform future evaluations of youth job-training programs.

Presenters
SA

Skye Allmang

Skye Allmang holds a B.A. in Cultural Anthropology from Boston University, an M.P.P. from Brandeis University, and an M.S.W. from UCLA. Prior to coming to UCLA, she worked for several years as a project coordinator at a youth job-training program in Santa Barbara County. She currently works as a Graduate Student Researcher at UCLA's Center for the Study of Women, focusing on issues related to women and employment. Her scholarly research is on the... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors Of Later Academic Success In Elementary School Students
Abstract #297
Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors of Later Academic Success in Elementary School Students
Presenter: Jameela Conway-Turner Co - Presenters: Tanya Tavassolie, Adam Winsler
Abstract:
Resilience is defined as academic/social competency despite experiencing significant challenges (Masten & Coatsworth, 1998). Using public school records of child ethnicity, gender, receipt of free/reduced lunch, language at home, and parent report of marital status and education, we examine longitudinal predictors of academic resilience (receiving ≥ B average and passing standardized tests) using data from the Miami School Readiness Project. This sample includes 28,138 children (59.1% Hispanic, 33.5% Black; 57% ELL; 79% receiving free/reduced lunch) who completed third-grade after attending subsidized childcare and/or public school pre-K and receiving school readiness assessments in pre-K. Resilient students (~60% of sample) were less likely to be in poverty and more likely to be native English speakers, White, female, and from two-parent households with more educated parents. Selecting only those in poverty in K, logistic regression analyses found children’s social-emotional strengths at age four significantly predicted third-grade academic achievement. Additional analyses will investigate whether relations between social-emotional strengths and later academic achievement are different for different ethnic groups. Although numerous risk-factors decrease the likelihood of academic excellence, many children in poverty overcome such challenges and do well academically. Early social-emotional skills serve as an important protective factor for children experiencing early economic adversity.

Presenters
JC

Jameela Conway-Turner

Jameela is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Jameela received her Masters degree from Boston College in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology. She has presented at and attended numerous prestigious psychological research conferences. Research interests include examining the educational and social environment of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
TT

Tanya Tavassolie

Doctoral Student at George Mason University Tanya is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Tanya worked as a research assistant in the Child Development Lab at University of Maryland. She has presented at and attended numerous prestigious psychological research conferences. Research interests include examining the... Read More →
avatar for Adam Winsler

Adam Winsler

Professor, George Mason University
Dr. Adam Winsler is professor of applied developmental psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, USA. His research, represented in over 90 publications, examines private speech (self-talk) and its role in behavioral self-regulation and executive function among typically developing children as well as children with ADHD or autism. He also studies early childhood programs, school readiness, kindergarten retention, and bilingual... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes
Abstract #295
Resilience in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes
Presenter: Luciana Cassarino-Perez Co - Presenter: Débora Dell'Aglio  
Abstract:
This study investigated processes of resilience in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, identifying risk and protective factors through multiple case studies. Participants were three adolescents, two boys and one girl, aged 13 to 14, who were patients of an institution specialized in treatment of diabetic patients, and their mothers. The instruments used were semi-structured interviews and the Five Field Map. The interviews were designed to investigate how these patients take care of their own health, how they cope with the disease, the benefits and losses of having diabetes, as well as personal characteristics and future plans. Qualitative content analysis was made using the WebQDA software, based on the Bioecological Theory of Human Development. It was found that protective factors such as social support, emotional attachment and personal characteristics of self-esteem, optimism and altruism, contributed to expression of resilience processes. Conclusions highlight the importance of strengthening the support network as a protective factor for coping with type 1 diabetes, especially through the integration between the different contexts in which teenagers are inserted.

Presenters
LC

Luciana Cassarino-Perez

Born in Curitiba, southern Brazil, Perez-Cassarino graduated in Psychology at the Federal University of Paraná (2008). Completed her Master in Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (2013), where she recently started her PhD studies. Her expertise in Psychology is Human Development and Health, acting on the following topics: resilience, human development in contexts of vulnerability, health promotion and diabetes.

Co-Presenters
avatar for Debora Dell'Aglio

Debora Dell'Aglio

Professor, UFRGS
Professor at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil, Dell’Aglio graduated in Psychology in the Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul (1983). Completed her Master in Developmental Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (1992) and her PhD in the same University, in 2000. Currently, she is a professor at the Graduate Program in Psychology at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul and editor of the... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience, Agency, and Democratic Education
Abstract #268
Resilience, Agency, and Democratic Education 
Presenter: Michael Peacock
Abstract:
I am interested in creating an educational setting that promotes resilient attitudes for educational options. Research has identified educational variables that motivate students to learn, yet schools are not or cannot implement these recommendations with fidelity, especially those in the urban American cores (Brophy, 2010; Smith, 2009; Kozol, 2012) Currently, I work in an alternative public school that serves students in grades kindergarten through nine who have been referred out of their traditional public school environments due to significant behavior issues.  My interest in starting a school outside the traditional system stems from: observing how patterns of intergenerational social exclusion affect students and their families (Foster & Hagan, 2007) ; learning about various forms democratic and progressive educational environments and their outcomes (Neill, 1960; Kozol, 1972; Gray & Chanoff, 1986; Meier, 2003; Knoester, 2012); and, from living and working in an area where marginalized groups from various intersecting social constructions struggle to attain agency (Sugrue, 1996). Social, economic, political, and educational issues that have plagued urban metropolitan centers for over fifty years continue to crush youth with the ill effects of abuse, neglect, imprisonment, and broken networks of support (Brown v. Board of Education, 1954; Lempert, 1996; Burton, 2007; Sarchiapone, Carli, Cuomo, Marchetti, & Roy, 2009; Masten, Hubbard, Gest, Tellegen, Garmezy, & Ramirez, 1999). My intent is to bridge resilience theories with progressive/democratic educational practices and offer possible solutions that traditional public schools cannot or will not provide.

Presenters
MP

Michael Peacock

Graduate student at Eastern Michigan University studying Special Education for Students with Emotional Impairments


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resilience, Posttraumatic Growth And Positive Emotions In Parents Of Critically Ill Children
Abstract #290
Resilience, Posttraumatic Growth and Positive Emotions in Parents of Critically Ill Children
Presenter: Rocío Rodríguez-Rey Co - Presenter: Jesús Alonso-Tapia
Abstract:
Research on parental psychological effects related to a child’s critical illness has focused on studying negative outcomes; however, the positive outcomes have been overlooked. So, our aims were to study 1) the level of resilience, positive emotions, and posttraumatic growth (PTG) in parents of critically ill children and 2) which factors predict PTG after a child’s discharge from intensive care.A total of 143 parents were assessed 48h after the child’s discharge from intensive care, and 6 months later. Repeated Measures ANOVA and confirmatory regression analyses were conducted.Parents experienced twice more positive than negative emotions during admission, being gratitude and love the most prevalent ones. A high percentage of parents (60.84%) reported PTG. Resilience predicted 40% of the variance in PTG reported 6 months after the discharge, but this relation was mediated by positive emotions and stress (X2/df =1.67; GFI=.80; CFI=.84; IFI=.85; RMSEA=.069). The model showed that the higher was the difficulty of the situation, the higher the level of PTG reported. Not only distress, but also positive outcomes should be addressed when the effect of a traumatic experience is studied. This will led us to design interventions that takes into account not only psychopathology, but also positive changes.

Presenters
RR

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey is a Health Psychologist and a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Her field of interest is resilience, mental health, and posttraumatic growth in children who suffer from severe illnesses and their families. More specifically, she has conducted most of her research in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. She has worked in oncology... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Jesús Alonso-Tapia

Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Jesús Alonso-Tapia is a full-time Professor in Psychological and Educational Assessment at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Specialized in Motivation, self-regulation, resilience and learning assessment, he received the First National Price of Education in 1997. He is author of many publications in journals such as Learning and Instruction, Journal of Learning and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resiliency And Peer Social Bonds: Do Shared Adverse And Marginalized Experiences Enabled Overcoming “The Odds” In Crime?
Abstract #313
Resiliency and Peer Social Bonds: Do Shared Adverse and Marginalized Experiences Enabled Overcoming “The Odds” in Crime?
Presenter: Angelique Maes
Abstract:
The effects of parental incarceration on children are only beginning to be fully understood. So far, we know more about the detrimental effects of parental incarceration on children throughout the life course than about the positive efforts to assist the afflicted children in overcoming a detrimental obstacle in their lives. This project seeks to fill the gaps in the growing literature on the effects of parental incarceration throughout the life course by exploring ethnographic data that will be collected on peer resiliency: peer resiliency may be considered as a possible method to mitigate the harmful effects of parental incarceration throughout the life course. Building from a previous project, this project seeks to further understand how resiliency thrives and enables personal growth through peer relationships. Research on the development of resiliency through the parent/child relationship has saturated the literature: there does not seem to be research on how peer relationships enable such developments when children have parents who are incarcerated. Current research on resiliency has done well to begin to highlight the positive “buffer” social processes that can build resilience in children with incarcerated parents, but more research must be done in regards to the role peer relationships in such processes.

Presenters
avatar for Angelique Maes

Angelique Maes

My name is Angelique Nevarez Maes; I am a second year PhD student at Texas A&M University. I have a Master of Art’s degree that specializes in Sociology from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a Bachelor of Art’s degree the specializes in Criminal Justice and Psychology from the University of Texas at El Paso as well. I am interested in Crime and the Life Course, and how Resiliency developed outside the parent/child relationship (through... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Resiliency in Foster Youth and Perceived Social Support
Abstract #267
Resiliency in Foster Youth and Perceived Social Support
Presenter: Ciara Collins Co - Presenter: Preston Britner  
Abstract:
In this mixed methods study, we will present findings from program data collected by the UConn First Star Academy during its summer program in July of 2014. First Star brings high school foster youth from the state of Connecticut to spend one month living on campus participating in academically-oriented programming and building relationships with peers, mentors, and staff. The Positive Youth Development-Short Form and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support measures were administered pre- and post-summer program and qualitative journal questions were administered throughout the program. Journal prompts addressed topics such as identity, meaning making, support systems, coping strategies, adversities, and goals. Responses will be thematically coded by multiple researchers. The study will analyze quantitative and qualitative research individually as well as compare results between domains to arrive at an understanding that utilizes youths’ own voices. The goal of this study is to enhance data driven decision making over time in order to improve positive outcomes in at-risk foster youth.

Presenters
avatar for Ciara Collins

Ciara Collins

University of Connecticut
Ciara M. Collins, MA is a Doctoral candidate in the Human Development and Family Studies department at the University of Connecticut, recently completing her MA in the Marriage and Family Therapy program. She received her BA in Psychology from Biola University. She provides program evaluation for Head Start in Eastern Connecticut and UConn’s First Star Academy, as well as clinical outpatient services for children and their families at Wheeler... Read More →

Co-Presenters
PB

Preston Britner

Professor of Human Development & Family Studies at University of Connecticut | Preston A. Britner, Ph.D. is the Philip E. Austin Endowed Chair and a Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Virginia. He is a University Teaching Fellow, a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, and Editor Emeritus of The Journal of Primary... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

RPM-Android: A Tablet Application To Work Out Resilience With Vulnerable Families
Abstract #306
RPM-Android: A Tablet Application To Work Out Resilience With Vulnerable Families
Presenter: Marco Ius Co - Presenters: Carlo Fantozzi, Gianmaria Parigi Bini, Paola Milani
Abstract:
Professionals working with vulnerable families ask for new tools to facilitate their complex endeavor and to connect theory and practice. Within P.I.P.P.I. (Intervention Program for Prevention of Institutionalization) and its ecological perspective, particular focus is placed on tools supporting a resilience-based care process where the link between assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation is key, according to the participatory and transformative evaluation approach. In this framework, RPM-Android is a novel tablet application that aims at providing integrated support for all the professionals and members of families involved in the care process. Using the app:• children are involved in the assessment and planning by interacting directly with the tablet and navigating and negotiating the resources in their ecology;• professionals share information with parents, making them more involved and connected;• professionals easy document practice with the support of assessment, (micro)planning, evaluation, and a log of meetings with families.The paper will present the main features of RPM-Android, with particular emphasis on the innovative user interface for parents and children, then it will provide quantitative and qualitative feedback on the usefulness of the app in the workflow of social workers, based on data collected from a pilot of professionals within P.I.P.P.I. in 2014.

Presenters
MI

Marco Ius

Marco Ius got the PhD in Social Work with a research on resilience and Hidden Child Survivors of the Holocaust in 2009. From 2009 is Post-Doc researcher and from 2010 is part of the Scientific Group of the national Implementation of P.I.P.P.I. (Program of Intervention for Prevention of Institutionalization), a research-training-intervention program developed as an intensive care program for vulnerable families funded by the Italian Ministry of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
GP

Gianmaria Parigi Bini

Master student at Department of Information Engeneering (DEI), University of Padova, Italy | Master student in Computer Engineering.
CF

Carlo Fantozzi

PhD at Department of Information Engeneering (DEI), University of Padova, Italy | Carlo Fantozzi is Assistant Professor at the Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova. His current research interests are in the fields of high-performance computing, models of computation and embedded systems, areas where he has also been active as instructor of undergraduate courses. Carlo Fantozzi has served as PC member and referee for... Read More →
PM

Paola Milani

PhD at Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Pedagogy and Applied Psychology (FISPPA), University of Padova, Italy | Paola Milani is associate professor of Family Education and General and Social Pedagogy at the FISSPPA Department. Her research topics regards family education, social work with vulnerable families, resilience, co-education with family, school and service


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

School And Education: A Survey Of Articles Between 2000 To 2013
Abstract #323
School and Education: A Survey of Articles Between 2000 to 2013
Presenter: Vanessa Hanayo Sakotani
Abstract:
This abstract presents parcial analysis of a research that aims to analyse scientific publications on resilience and education, published in the period 2000-2013, in Portuguese. The search for articles was conducted on CAPES Journals Portal, SciELO and Medicine® with the following keywords: education and resilience, resilience, and school and student resilience, resilience, and student and teacher resilience, resilience and child and adolescent resilience. Among 15 articles that shows relations between resilience and education, we highlight 9 articles that approach the school’s roles to promote resilience. The articles declare that school is ideal place to promote resilience because: it’s possible to develop capabilities and potential of students (Peltz et al., 2010); when working with heterogenous groups it increases the relationship between students and teachers leading to human development (Fajardo et al., 2010); develop student autonomy (Scriptori and Junior, 2010), self esteem and self efficiency (Poletto e Koller, 2008); and coping strategies (Pinheiro, 2004); it’s exceeds only knowledge and help its to promote health, life quality and welfare (Fajardo et al., 2010). However, Peltz et al. (2010), Chrispino and Gonçalves (2013) and Amparo et al. (2008) indicate that school could be protective but it can be a risk, with teachers’ negative atitudes.

Presenters
avatar for Vanessa Sakotani

Vanessa Sakotani

Master Student, UNESP
I graduated in Education from UNESP and currently I'm Master student in Education at the same institution.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration
Abstract #289
Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration
Presenter: Geraldine Oades-Sese Co - Presenters: Joyce Lee, Sri Harathi, Victoria Millie, Melanie Yu, Ashley Rodgers, Isrin Srisethnil  
Abstract:
The purpose of the Sesame Street Resilience Project was to determine the effectiveness of the multimedia home intervention toolkit, Little Children, Big Challenge: Incarceration (English and Spanish), in promoting resilience in young children ages 2 to 6. Parents were trained to implement a 4-week resilience-based intervention in their homes. The intervention group focused on enhancing children’s social-emotional resilience, while the active control group focused on building physical/mental resilience through healthy eating and exercise. Participants included 100 families from the Northeast and were from socially and culturally diverse backgrounds. Families were randomly assigned to an active control or intervention group. The project used standardized rating scales from parents to measure parent-child communication, home environment, children’s social skills, and emotional competence. The project data are currently being analyzed and therefore the poster will discuss the final results in more depth. The poster will also provide implications for parent-based interventions and their effects on at-risk populations.

Presenters
GO

Geraldine Oades-Sese

Geraldine V. Oades-Sese, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and the Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. She is also the Director of the Research Lab for Resilience and Early Childhood Development. Her research includes Project Resilience, a 3-year longitudinal study, which examines the social-emotional and academic resilience of at-risk Hispanic American preschool... Read More →

Co-Presenters
SH

Sri Harathi

Sri Harathi, is the lab manager of the Sesame Street Resilience Project for the Divorce/Separation and Incarceration studies at the Institute for the Study of Child Development in Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She has been working with the project since February of 2013. Sri graduated in May 2014 with her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Rutgers New Brunswick. She plans to pursue her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Her research... Read More →
JL

Joyce Lee

Social Work Supervisor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Joyce Y. Lee, LSW, is a licensed social worker and Social Work Supervisor at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her research interests include parent-based characteristics that promote social-emotional resilience in preschool children as well as young children’s individual temperament profiles as predictors... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mille

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Victoria N. Mille, is a Masters in Social Work student at Rutgers University. She is also a Research Assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She is currently working on the Sesame Street Resilience Project that examines resilience of separated/divorced families and resilience of families with an incarcerated... Read More →
AR

Ashley Rodgers

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Ashley Rodgers, received her B.A. in Psychology and minor in Biology from Rutgers University in May 2015. Before graduating, she worked as a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
IS

Isrin Srisethnil

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Isrin Srisethnil, is a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. He is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s in Psychology and a minor in Biology.
MY

Melanie Yu

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Melanie Yu received her B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies from Rutgers University in May 2015. Prior to graduating, she worked at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce
Abstract # 284:
Sesame Street Resilience Project, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce
Presenter: Sri Harathi Co - Presenters: Joyce Lee, Victoria Mille, Ashley Rodgers, Isrin Srisethnil, Melanie Yu
The purpose of the Sesame Street Resilience Project is to determine the effectiveness of the multimedia home intervention toolkit, Little Children, Big Challenges: Divorce, in promoting resilience in young children ages 2 to 6 whose parents are either divorced or separated. Participating families were given the toolkits along with a 4 week schedule of activities that outlined specific activities for each day of the program. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or active control group. The intervention group received materials directly addressing the issue of divorce or separation by teaching families about attachment relationships, emotional understanding, and sense of self. The active control group was given the Healthy Habits toolkit, which addressed the topic of healthy eating and lifestyle in order to promote physical/mental resilience. Participants included 100 families from the Northeast and were evaluated by a questionnaire that the parent filled out at pre- and post-intervention. The questionnaire included standardized measures that evaluated the parent-child relationship, emotional competence, and emotional regulation. The project data are currently being analyzed, therefore the poster will discuss the results in greater length. The poster will also address the implications of home interventions and their effects on at-risk populations.

Presenters
SH

Sri Harathi

Sri Harathi, is the lab manager of the Sesame Street Resilience Project for the Divorce/Separation and Incarceration studies at the Institute for the Study of Child Development in Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She has been working with the project since February of 2013. Sri graduated in May 2014 with her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Rutgers New Brunswick. She plans to pursue her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Her research... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JL

Joyce Lee

Social Work Supervisor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Joyce Y. Lee, LSW, is a licensed social worker and Social Work Supervisor at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Her research interests include parent-based characteristics that promote social-emotional resilience in preschool children as well as young children’s individual temperament profiles as predictors... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mille

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Victoria N. Mille, is a Masters in Social Work student at Rutgers University. She is also a Research Assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She is currently working on the Sesame Street Resilience Project that examines resilience of separated/divorced families and resilience of families with an incarcerated... Read More →
AR

Ashley Rodgers

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Ashley Rodgers, received her B.A. in Psychology and minor in Biology from Rutgers University in May 2015. Before graduating, she worked as a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
IS

Isrin Srisethnil

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Isrin Srisethnil, is a research assistant at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers RWJ Medical School. He is a recent graduate of Rutgers University with a Bachelor’s in Psychology and a minor in Biology.
MY

Melanie Yu

Research Assistant at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School | Melanie Yu received her B.A. in Psychology and a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies from Rutgers University in May 2015. Prior to graduating, she worked at the Institute for the Study of Child Development, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Shared Adversities of Disadvantaged Children and Comic Superheroes as Resources for Promoting Resilience

Abstract #263
Shared Adversities of Disadvantaged Children and Comic Superheroes as Resources for Promoting Resilience
Presenter: Maria Angela Mattar Yunes Co - Presenters: Chris Fradkin, Gelson Weschenfelder
Abstract:
Studies indicate that disadvantaged children are at higher risk for behavioral problems and psychosocial issues, in relation to their non-disadvantaged peers. If these issues are not addressed in childhood, these children frequently mature into adults at higher risk for substance dependence, depression, and incarceration, in relation to societal norms. This study examined possible relationships and associations between the real-life adversities of disadvantaged children and the fictional adversities of popular comic superheroes, in their pre-cloak, pre-costume stage of life. An indexing of comic superheroes was conducted. In the process, it was found that the most relevant superheroes, in terms of pop culture visibility (e.g., Spiderman, Batman, Superman) had a high commonality of shared adversities (e.g., abandonment by family, domestic violence and abuse) with several subgroups of disadvantaged children: orphaned and abandoned children. This untapped resource has potential among clinicians, social workers, and public policy designers for building resilience and promoting empowerment among this hi-risk child and adolescent group. 


Presenters
MA

Maria Angela Mattar Yunes

Lecturer and advisor at the programs of post graduation studies in education in Centro Universitário La Salle - UNILASALLE, Canoas and Universidade Federal do Rio Grande - FURG, Brasil. Main interest on research and intervention on family resilience, community resilience and parental support programs.

Co-Presenters
CF

Chris Fradkin

Chris Fradkin received his PhD in Psychology from the University of California, Merced. His research focus has been on obesity risk, quality of life, and health disparities among at-risk adolescents. He is currently conducting post-doctorate research at Centro Universitário La Salle, UNILASALLE in Southern Brazil, on the role that parental education has with children's obesity. Fradkin's academic work has been published in Health... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Sport For Resilience: Fostering Rural Youth Resilience Through Participation In Non-Therapy Equine-Based Activity
Abstract #324
Sport for Resilience: Fostering Rural Youth Resilience Through Participation in Non-Therapy Equine-Based Activity 
Presenter: Heather Sansom Co - Presenters: Harry Cummings, Leah Levac
Abstract:
Rural communities in Canada are changing. These changes include widening socioeconomic gaps amongst community members, and degraded infrastructure. Normative adversity associated with youth transition to adulthood is magnified in rural areas, where community-level changes are creating ecological conditions that can adversely affect youth. This leads to need for youth programming that is pro-actively inclusive of resilience needs. Sport-for-development (S4D) explores sport as a vehicle for combining physical and psycho-social development. Studies often show benefits akin to resilience factors. Yet, there are gaps in the research, which creates challenges for efforts to embed resilience goals in community recreation programs. There are very few S4D studies focused specifically on developing resilience amongst rural youth , and virtually no research that considers how program elements contribute to youth resilience. Equine-based therapy programs show resilience-related outcomes for youth, but non-therapy equine-assisted programs have not been studied extensively through a resilience lens, or as a community S4D option.This poster will spark conversation by: a) showing connections between rural needs, equine activity, S4D, and resilience; b) describing the methods and hypotheses of a current research project exploring how youth experience protective factors for resilience through participation in non-therapy equine-assisted programs.

Presenters
avatar for Heather Sansom

Heather Sansom

PhD Student, University of Guelph
Heather Sansom is a PhD student in Rural Studies at the University of Guelph, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development. Her doctoral work focuses on the intersections between rural wellbeing issues and rural recreation, sport-for-development, animal/nature based experiential learning, and resilience. She will be collecting data on the lived experience of protective factors for resilience among youth participants in positive youth... Read More →

Co-Presenters
HC

Harry Cummings

Harry Cummings, Phd., Professor, University of Guelph and Director Harry Cummings and Associates. Harry has taught evaluation at the University of Guelph for 35 years. He is author of the CES short course on program logic models. He has practised international development and evaluation since 1982 and recently has done evaluation work for UNICEF Indonesia, World Vision Sierra Leone and the Canadian Red Cross. He is a frequent presenter at both... Read More →
LL

Leah Levac

Assistant Professor at University of Guelph | Leah Levac is an Assistant Professor in Community Engaged Scholarship in the Department of Political Science at the University of Guelph. She has experience leading community-university research collaborations, professional background in nature-based out


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Stay And Success School Teen Authors Ato Infraction: Perceptions Of Adolescent
Abstract #312
Stay and Success School Teen Authors Ato Infraction: Perceptions of Adolescent
Presenter: Elizabeth Lourenção  
Abstract:
This study aims to research the permanence and academic success of adolescents who have an offense, from their own perceptions . The theme presented here grew out of concern that we were awakened from our professional practice , working as a social worker in direct and indirect care of families experiencing situation of human rights violations , as well as in the discussion and planning of actions to direct execution of children and adolescents , along with the Public Prosecutor Ministry of Justice of the State of São Paulo - Regional Area Presidente Prudente , in particular, childhood and youth. The research subjects were 13 adolescents who infraction , in the age group between 12-18 years old, coming from the city of Presidente Prudente / SP , inserted or not in the public schools and under socio- open middle. The approach taken with adolescents was conducted through reflective interviews with semi-structured , in order to understand the phenomenon researched by the perceptions of the adolescents themselves , guaranteeing them the right to be heard , and then reflect upon their speech and if decline , disagree or modify their proposals . Documentary research was also conducted with individual plans of care ( PIA ), which sought to build his biographies of living.

Presenters
avatar for Elizabeth Lourenção

Elizabeth Lourenção

Master candidate in education, Faculty of Science and Tecnology, University from Sao Paulo (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil
I am a social worker working in the Prosecutor's Office of Children and Youth of the Public Ministry of the State of São Paulo; Professor of Social Work faculty in Presidente Prudente Toledo; I am applying for the master's degree in the graduate program in education at Universidade Estadual Paulista in the city of Presidente Prudente / SP / Brazil


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Stories Of Survival And Resilience From Aotearoa: A Qualitative Enquiry Into What Helps Māori Through Family/Whānau Violence.
Abstract #331
Stories of Survival and Resilience from Aotearoa: A Qualitative Enquiry Into What Helps Māori Through Family/Whānau Violence
Presenter: Anna Walters
Abstract:
Family violence is overrepresented amongst Māori, the indigenous people of Aotearoa/New Zealand, and as elsewhere has been found to have significant consequences for children. Extant research has been predominantly deficit-focused. The current project focused on protective factors and resilience. This was investigated through the use of qualitative methods, situated within a framework of kaupapa Māori methodology (indigenous research theory and methods). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with professionals working with Māori and survivors of family violence. Thematic analysis of transcripts revealed several dominant themes including the importance of having at least one supportive adult who they could trust; most often a family member or teacher. A positive connection with their Māori identity and culture was also considered to contribute to resilience with wairua (spirituality) being particularly important. Resilience was also assisted by having an interest or skill in which they experienced success or engagement. Connection with peers and having positive role models were considered helpful. Therapeutic contributions to resilience included promotion of a sense of belonging, building hope for the future, and assisting the survivor to accept that the violence was not their fault. Implications for professionals working with Māori families are presented.

Presenters
AW

Anna Walters

Anna is of Māori descent (Ngāpuhi). She was employed by the Department of Corrections for over eight years in the probation services. She is currently in her final year of a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, undertaking an internship in a Māori child and adolescent mental health team.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Strengthening Family and Community Resilience: A Rational Approach
Abstract #279
Strengthening Family and Community Resilience: A Rational Approach
Presenter: Barry Smith
Abstract: 
It is important to recognise that resilience is a relational product which develops from early infant attachment through to family, neighbourhood, and community relationships. Along with good and effective parenting, a sense of community and social capital are two important aspects of engendering resiliency in individuals, families, and communities. Working with families living with disadvantage and poverty in West Cumbria, England, this study seeks to draw on resilience research from genetics, biology, psychology, and sociology in devising a family and community resilience intervention. The interrogation of two hundred and twenty family case files from the Howgill Family Centre reveals parenting and relationships to be two major presenting factors for families in need of assistance. As many of the parenting difficulties are themselves relational in nature, it appears that dysfunctional relations and communication are playing a major part in testing the resilience of children and their parents. In a highly innovative study aimed at promoting relationships as a protective factor, family centres and schools will be used as a community hub in exploring individual differences, relationships, and relational dynamics, as part of a strengths-based programme aimed at building family and community resilience.

Presenters
avatar for Barry Smith

Barry Smith

Project Officer/KTP Associate, University of Central Lancashire
R. Barry Smith is currently a doctoral research student at the University of Central Lancashire and engaged in a three year investigation into family resilience. This study involves a knowledge transfer partnership between the university and the Sure Start organisation, the Howgill Family Centre. After working as an Assistant Psychologist in brain rehabilitation, he then became a Lecturer in Psychology and Health and Social Care and has a... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Subjective Contextual Resilience Assessment: Comparison Of Three Different Populations.
Abstract #303
Subjective Contextual Resilience Assessment: Comparison of Three Different Populations
Presenter: Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido Co - Presenters: Rocío Rodríguez-Rey, Jesús Alonso-Tapia, Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz, Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno  
Abstract:
Resilience can be shown in different degrees across different kinds of adversity. No measure considering different contexts exists, so we validated a 20-item Subjective Contextual Resilience Scale (SCRS) with five problem areas –work, relationships, own health, close person health and economy. It was completed by 423 adults with three different conditions (health issues, parents of children with health or developmental issues and healthy adults) along with CDRISC10 and BRS questionnaire. We tested a 5x1 hierarchical factor model and conducted reliability and correlation analyses, and ANOVAs.The 5x1 factor structure was well defined, and reliability was good for all measures in all samples except for SCRS economic area –acceptable only in the healthy sample. Correlations among measures were acceptable, the highest ones being between SCRS –and its subscales– and BRS. There were no mean differences among samples in any measure including SCRS subscales, but a difference emerged in the work and relationships areas when comparing healthy adults to adults with issues (them or their children), showing greater resilience those with issues. There were also mean differences among SCRS’ subscales in all subsamples.Our contextual scale, therefore, can be used to measure resilience within different contexts and across different types of populations.

Presenters
avatar for Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido

Ph. D Candidate, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Helena Hernansaiz-Garrido is a Ph.D candidate at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, who develops her work in the area of resilience in health issues, particularly with People Living with HIV. She is also interested and engaged in research related to associated stigma and lack of social support, both in HIV+ condition and in sexual diversity. She is currently collaborating in Sandoval Health Center in Madrid, specializing in sexually... Read More →

Co-Presenters
JA

Jesús Alonso-Tapia

Professor at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Jesús Alonso-Tapia is a full-time Professor in Psychological and Educational Assessment at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Specialized in Motivation, self-regulation, resilience and learning assessment, he received the First National Price of Education in 1997. He is author of many publications in journals such as Learning and Instruction, Journal of Learning and... Read More →
CN

Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Carmen Nieto-Vizcaíno is a Ph.D teacher in the Experimental Psychology Department at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She is interested in the study of basic processes in children with developmental difficulties, especially in children with Autism.
RR

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey

Rocío Rodríguez-Rey is a Health Psychologist and a Ph.D candidate in the Department of Biological and Health Psychology at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain. Her field of interest is resilience, mental health, and posttraumatic growth in children who suffer from severe illnesses and their families. More specifically, she has conducted most of her research in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. She has worked in oncology... Read More →
MN

Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz

Ph.D at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | Miguel Ángel Ruiz-Díaz is a Ph.D teacher in Multivariate Techniques at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. He has collaborated in the development and adaptation to Spanish language of several quality of life measures.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Art Of Navigating Torrents: A Study Of Resilience Dimensions Among Adolescents By Ethic Group
Abstract #309
The Art of Navigating Torrents: A Study of Resilience Dimensions Among Adolescents by Ethic Group
Presenter: Monica Lavoie
Abstract:
How is it that an individual can hold out in front of life’s hardships? Resilience is a concept often used to account for one’s ability to bounce back, overcome, and even navigate torrents. The aim of this study is to document resilience dimensions according to an adolescent population adapted scale (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen & Rosenvinge, 2006), and according to the perspective of Euro-Canadians and First Nations. The scale proposed by Hjemdal and his collaborators suggests the five following themes to resilience: personal competences, social competences, structured style, family cohesion, and social resources. Two hundred and thirty adolescents, 143 Euro-Canadians and 87 First Nations, took part in this study and completed a questionnaire. An exploratory factorial analyse reveals divergent results according to the ethnic group. For European descent adolescents, a four factor solution is obtained. Otherwise, among First Nations, resilience is constituted of two dimensions. The challenge of articulating resilience dimensions reflecting cultural specificity is discussed.

Presenters
ML

Monica Lavoie

Monica Lavoie graduated from a bachelor in psychology at the Université de Moncton in 2011. Before undertaking post-graduate studies, she worked as a Research Associate with the Centre de recherche et de développement en éducation (CRDE). Her research interests include resilience, minority groups, and at-risk populations. She has worked on research projects and program evaluations with various populations, namely First Nations, at-risk... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Challenges to Children’s Rights in the Mtaa Mediation Committee System in Tanzania: A Case of Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam Region, Tanzania
Abstract #293
The Challenges to Children’s Rights in the Mtaa Mediation Committee System in Tanzania: A Case of Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam Region, Tanzania
Presenter: Angela Daniel Ifunya  
Abstract:
This is based on the research conducted in Kombo Mtaa Mediation Committee, Ilala Municipality, Dar es salaam region, Tanzania.In many rural and poor urban areas of the world, people do not have access to state-administered justice and security institutions, or choose not to use them. In Tanzania, most of the disputes are resolved by grassroots institutions at the mtaa and ward level in the case of urban local governance authorities. The study aimed to better understand mtaa mediation committee system, provide knowledge about it, assess the problems and be able to recommend reform initiatives.I conducted in-depth individual interviews, observations and focus group discussions with 10 children aged 11-17 years old and 16 adults: mtaa mediators, parents, ward tribunal officials, community leaders and government officials. The findings reveals: lack of protection of children against family violence in a situation where the perpetrator is breadwinner; lack of proper involvement of children in cases determination; too much focussed on punishment including corporal punishment instead of rehabilitation; lack of protection in procedures when children put behind bars; lack of recording of proceedings and decisions; lack of adequate knowledge about rights of children to mtaa mediators.

Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Impact on Disadvantaged Pupils of a Whole School Resilience Approach
Abstract #298
The Impact on Disadvantaged Pupils of a Whole School Resilience Approach 
Presenter: Stephanie Coombe
Abstract:
This research used a Whole School approach, implementing the Resilience Framework (RF) developed by Hart, Blincow and Thomas (2007) to improve outcomes for children with complex needs, set in the context of socio-economic adversity (the third most deprived Borough in England). Pupils in this context benefitted from a whole school RF approach because it focused on their strengths and needs holistically, not just academically. The whole school approach involved recognised the importance and positive impact of relationships and significant others in pupils’ lives – site supervisors, teachers, cooks, sports coaches, senior leaders.A collaborative, mixed methods approach was used in this research to investigate the following aims with 12 staff and 12 pupils: To identify staff practice that supported their developing resilience in pupils. To identify with staff when, and whether a resilience framework could be incorporated into their daily practice.  To identify the mechanisms that staff and pupils consider have a positive impact on pupil’s wellbeing when using the RF. To address a gap in the resilience based practice literature on developing interventions for pupils with complex needs.

Presenters
SC

Stephanie Coombe

I am a PhD student with the University of Brighton and an Assistant Head Teacher in a Special School in East London for children and young people with Special Educational Needs. Professor Angie Hart and Dr Carl Walker, at the University of Brighton, supervise me. I hold a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Arts (Psychology), along with a Post Graduate Certificate in Supervision of Educational Psychologists, (all from Massey University, New... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Resilience Report: Therapeutic Use Of Measures To Guide Intervention And Conversation
Abstract #332
The Resilience Report: Therapeutic Use of Measures to Guide Intervention and Conversation
Presenter: Lyn Worsley Co - Presenter: Odin Hjemdal  
Abstract:
The use of online, self-report tools to monitor physical fitness has paved the way for similar tools to monitor wellbeing and resilience. An ideal resilience tool would give direct positive feedback; provide ideas for improvement and measure change over time. It would also use validated measures useful for research as well as provide ongoing evaluation tools to monitor the effectiveness of an intervention for large groups of people. The Resilience Report provides a snapshot of the specific resilience characteristics of individuals and provides avenues for intervention and on going support. The online report uses the Resilience Doughnut interactive tool (Worsley, 2010), the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (Hjemdal, Friborg, Stiles, Martinussen, Rosenvinge 2006) and the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (Robert Goodman, 2005) to identify three key elements contributing to resilience and wellbeing. The results highlight strong available resources, five subscales of competencies and protective factors and four subscales of difficulties.The report can be used in organisations to establish the effectiveness of intervention programs and highlight participants who may need extra support. The report can be used as a self-report for individuals who want to self-monitor as well as a group report for coordinators in organisations who want to track the mental wellbeing of their students.The Report has a fun interface promoting interaction, conversation and curiosity and gives practical suggestions of ordinary magic that is already present in their lives.

Presenters
avatar for Lyn Worsley

Lyn Worsley

Director, The Resilience Centre
Lyn WorsleyLyn is a Clinical Psychologist with a background in nursing, teaching, and youth work. She is the director of the Resilience Centre in Epping, Sydney, which has a reputation for innovative solution, focussed approaches to client change through individual and group therapies for over 17 years. At the Resilience Centre, Lyn supervises specialist psychologists and coordinates community seminars, training workshops, and resilience groups... Read More →

Co-Presenters
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents, and particularly measuring protective factors. Developing research based direct measures of protective factors that captures essential protective resources is... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

The Role Of Resilience Processes In Emotion Dysregulation, Parent Responses, And Childhood Loneliness
Abstract #326
The Role of Resilience Processes in Emotion Dysregulation, Parent Responses, and Childhood Loneliness
Presenter: Laura Schwartz
Abstract:
Unsupportive parent/child interactions can negatively impact children at multiple levels of functioning. It is unknown what role child resilience may play in buffering these deleterious effects. This study examined the associations between children's dysregulation of their anger, mothers' responses to their children's anger, and children's feelings of loneliness, as well as the moderating role of resilience processes. Participants included 174 children in grades 3-5 (Mgrade= 3.93). Children were predominately white (73%) and 53% were female. Children reported on their mothers' responses to their anger on the Emotions as a Child Scale to derive Neglect, Punish, Override, Magnify, and Support subscales. Self-reported mean scores for Peer Loneliness on the Loneliness Scale, Anger Dysregulation on the Children's Emotion Management Scale and total Resilience on the Child Youth Resilience Measure were used in all analyses. Separate multiple regressions for each parental response to anger subscale tested moderated mediation models. Results indicated significant moderated mediation, such that Resilience decreased the negative impact of Child Anger Dysregulation on Peer Loneliness (β=.05, p=.03) when mothers used Neglect, Magnify, Support, and Override responses to their children’s anger. Findings suggest that resilience processes, such as personal skills and education, may serve as a safeguard against childhood loneliness.

Presenters
LS

Laura Schwartz

Laura Schwartz a first year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology doctoral program at the University of Memphis. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology at The Ohio State University in 2012. Her research interests include how risk and protective factors, both on individual and familial levels, influence child adjustment.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Thrive
Abstract #273
Thrive
Presenter: Andraya Macmillan 
Abstract:
As a result of the growing number of youth struggling with mental health issues in our community, Rebound has created a resiliency based group to support youth in attaining the required non-cognitive skills to cope with real life issues such as disappointment, rejection, boredom and increase skills in the areas of persistence, self-determination, mindfulness. We use volunteers and staff to coach youth in a safe, supportive environment where new ways of thinking and coping can be practiced and reinforced. Youth leave the THRIVE program more self-confident and assured of their value to friends, family and our community.

Presenters
avatar for Andraya MacMillan

Andraya MacMillan

Program Coordinator, Sarnia Lambton Rebound
Andraya MacMillan is the Choices Provincial Lead as well as a Youth in Transition Worker with Sarnia Lambton Rebound. She has been working with Rebound for over 5 years now, has worked with high-risk youth for 14 years and is passionate about supporting her community. Andraya has been involved with the Choices project for a number of years, supporting eight communities across Ontario and has really been energized by the evaluation process and... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Understanding Risk and Resilience in the Context of Childhood Polyvictimization
Abstract #327
Understanding Risk and Resilience in the Context of Childhood Polyvictimization
Presenter: Kathryn Scrafford  
Abstract:
Research exploring associations has emphasized single types of trauma exposure rather than exposure to multiple forms of violence. The study examined: the relationship between childhood and adulthood victimization; patterns of victimization and their association with current personality dimensions and resilience; and the associations between personality dimensions and resilience. A sample of 296 adults (18-76) exposed to violence in childhood responded to the survey online.A logistic regression examined the contribution of childhood victimization (CV) to adulthood re-victimization (AR) controlling for past year stress (PYS). Both CV (β=.124) and PYS (β =.092) significantly predicted AR.Based on victimization history, four groups were created (1= ≤ 3 events CV without AR; 2= ≥ 4 events CV without AR; 3= ≤ 3 events CV+AR; 4= ≥ 4 events CV+AR). ANOVAs revealed no significant differences in resilience or personality factors by victimization history except openness (F(3,268)=4.99, p

Presenters
KS

Kathryn Scrafford

Kathryn Scrafford is a doctoral student in Clinical Psychology and Peace Studies at Notre Dame. Her research interests include resilience and trauma in post-conflict societies.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Unstuffed! A School-Wide Strength-Based Teacher-Led Mental Health Conference. A Fresh Approach To A Resilience-Focused Mental Health Conference In A Secondary School Setting.
Abstract #287
Unstuffed! A School-Wide Strength-Based Teacher-Led Mental Health Conference. A Fresh Approach to a Resilience-Focused Mental Health Conference in Secondary School Setting. 
Presenter: Kingsley Hurlington Co - Presenters: Ruth Marinelli, Eileen Dahl  
Abstract:
An Ecological Framework of resilience posits the importance of environment in the development of resilience characteristics in individuals.
For teens, school can be one of the most important environments for bolstering resilience (Benard, 2006; Masten and Coatsworth, 1998). School needs to provide students with an environment that assists them with learning and also facilitates the development of personal resilience characteristics through positive mentorship (Ungar 2004). This program review explores the impact of a single mental health conference intervention on the strengthening of resilience characteristics in secondary school students. In response to growing concerns about mental health issues in the adolescent population (Lam, 2014), a mental health conference was created that offered students sessions led by teacher-mentors at their school. The results of student surveys indicated the significant effect of the intervention on their awareness of their own mental health challenges and that of their peers, increased confidence in negotiating their way to appropriate psychosocial supports, and deepened empathetic response to others in order to create a more positive and inclusive educational environment. Teacher-mentors also indicated their increased capacity to assist students in navigating mental health supports in their school and community.

Presenters
KH

Kingsley Hurlington

York Region District School Board
Kingsley Hurlington is a doctoral candidate at Trent University. He has authored textbooks related to Canadian Geography. His doctoral work focuses on resilience and communities, with a special focus on rural contexts. For this work, he draws upon his varied experiences working with youth through many years in education from elementary to university and his private mentorship support program.

Co-Presenters
ED

Eileen Dahl

Psychotherapist / Consultant / Speaker, Self Employed
Eileen Dahl is a Registered Psychotherapist. She is Certified in Thanatology - death, dying and bereavement (CT) and is a certified spiritual care professional / hospital chaplain with the Canadian Association for Spiritual Care. She has experience working in oncology and palliative care, trauma, mental health and cardiac intensive care units. Eileen is a public speaker and workshop facilitator. Her areas of focus include illness, grief, loss... Read More →
RM

Ruth Marinelli

Teacher at York Region District School Board | Ruth Marinelli is a secondary school teacher with the York Region District School Board where she works with academically and socially vulnerable students. She is a Masters of Education candidate at OISE.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Using Resilient Therapy In Practice: Family-Based Resilience Interventions
Abstract # 285:
Using Resilient Therapy In Practice: Family-Based Resilience Interventions
Presenter: Sarah Henderson
Abstract: 
Newport Mind and boingboing have been researching the use of Resilient Therapy over 18 months. We have been measuring and evaluating the resilience framework and its effectiveness in our work with young people and families in the community of Newport. With a focus on mental wellbeing, the resilience framework has been applied to practice with families utilising an action research approach. All aspects of resilience theory and practice has been, and continues to be, explored during the day to day practice of the team, shaping the support provision for families who experience complex adversity, alongside dealing with mental health problems. The framework has been adapted to include a holistic view of resilience within a family unit, highlighting the importance of group dynamics and relationships for the promotion and sustainability of resilience. Key input of families has enabled our practice to focus on the operational challenges that families face on a day to day basis. ‘By designing the services that met the needs of our son and us as his parents, were invaluable. This service is a need’ - a parent of a young person experiencing low mood/ self-esteem. Families highlighted the ease of use of the framework due to its design; however highlight the need for adaptation of the terminology for use as a family unit. The partnership provides opportunities for practitioners to focus support provision on theory based interventions that develop resilience in family units.

Presenters
SH

Sarah Henderson

Sarah Henderson is a Family Wellbeing and Resilience Worker at the mental health charity Newport Mind, in partnership with the University of Brighton and the Families First government initiative in Newport, South Wales. She graduated with a BSc Psychology degree in 2012 and has since completed Health and Social Care related training. Sarah's practice, and that of members of her team, is based on working with the resilience framework, developed by... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Validation of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) with a French-speaking Canadian sample
Abstract #319
Validation of the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) With a French-Ppeaking Canadian Sample
Presenter: Nathalie Parent Co - Presenters: Odin Hjemdal, Martine Hebert  
Abstract:
Resilience can take a variety of meanings but it’s mostly associated with the ability to maintain normal functioning despite adversity (Rutter, 2000). In the past decade, great efforts were made to define the construct but few measurement scales of resilience were developed (Naglieri & LeBuffe, 2005). In a methodological review of available instruments, Windle, Bennett and Noyes (2011) concluded that the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA; Hjemdal, Friborg, Martinussen, & Rosenvinge, 2001) is one of the most relevant. The main objective of this study is to validate the use of the RSA with a French-speaking Canadian population. Moderator effects of resilience on symptomatology are also investigated. 750 French-speaking students at University Laval (Quebec, Canada) completed the RSA and measures of related variables such as early trauma experiences, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychological well-being. Participants also completed the Conner-Davidson Resilience scale (Conner & Davidson, 2003). Confirmatory factorial analyses and reliability analyses were conducted. Alpha coefficients of the subscales range from 0.70 to 0.90. Significant correlations are observed with measures of construct-related variables. Hierarchical regression analyses show that some dimensions of the RSA have a main effect on PTSD symptoms, while others have a buffering effect depending on early trauma experiences. This study supports the cross-cultural validity of the RSA. The relevance of dimensions-level analyses of resilience effects on symptomatology is also highlighted.

Presenters
NP

Nathalie Parent

Psychologist - National University of Colombia | Master of Mental Health - University of Antioquia | Investigator and professor of the research line on resilience and positive development of the National School of Public Health at the University of Antioquia, coordinator of the observatory for the youth of the city of Medellin

Co-Presenters
MH

Martine Hébert

Martine Hébert (Ph.D. in psychology) is professor at the sexology department of Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM). She has training in child development and child clinical psychology as well as a strong background in psychometry. In the past 25 years, her research interests have focused on the consequences associated with interpersonal trauma. She has published research papers documenting the diversity of... Read More →
OH

Odin Hjemdal

Odin Hjemdal, professor of clinical adult psychology and quantitative methods and statistics, and a clinical psychologist at Department of Psychology at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. His research is related to resilience among adults and adolescents, and particularly measuring protective factors. Developing research based direct measures of protective factors that captures essential protective resources is... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Violence Prevention Program For At Risk Youth In Guatemala
Abstract #283
Violence Prevention Program for At Risk Youth in Guatemala 
Presenter: Tannia Castaneda  
Abstract:
The purpose of this poster is to show counseling and mental health interventions conducted in a technical education program with at risk youth. The young people who joined the program, from identified “red zones”, immerse in a context of adversity such as high rates of violence, poverty and lack of opportunities in Guatemala. Despite the difficult environment that the youth face, they choose to pursue education to obtain technical degrees. The program included the participation of two cohorts of students enrolled in a 2-year Computer-Programming Plan, parents and key personnel at the educational institution. Through workshops in topics of self-awareness, problem solving, personal life project, group and individual counseling, they revealed information about resources and influences that had been helpful for them to overcome adversity. Students’ perception was recollected before and after the counseling interventions with a Furlong’s well-being scale. Based on results from the program, this poster would also present suggestions for future steps to make research on resilience to explore in depth the experiences of these young students to understand their protective processes, roles of families, schools, culture and community that lead them to look for self-improvement while others in the same context of adversity do not.

Presenters
avatar for Tannia Lopez De Castaneda

Tannia Lopez De Castaneda

Applied Psychology PhD Candidate, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala
Specialist with work experience in violence prevention, socio-emotional learning and organizational change and counseling. Educational background includes counseling in psychology, business and educational settings.


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

What Youth Need To Do Well! Lessons From Youth
Abstract #269
What Youth Need to do Well! Lessons From Youth
Presenter: Mallery Denny
Abstract:
"The hand-drum is the beat of the soul; the eagle is the guide through our path; we unite as a team of speakers, as we mumble but never stumble. We are our people." These words are included in a mural on a community wall in Eskasoni, Canada. The mural shows what we have learned through the Spaces and Places Research Project (S&P) about what young people like us, in OU.R. Eskasoni, need to do well. We use the mural to share this knowledge with our community -- the people who support us to do better. Join us at the Spaces and Places poster display where you can see the mural and talk with us about what we believe young people in rural communities, and elsewhere, need to do well. We will also share with researchers what they need to know to do better research with young people like us. We will tell them what we enjoyed and found useful about participating in research; and what we didn't enjoy, what should have been different. We'll let them know what was hard, but what motivated us to stick it out, and care about the research project and how it could help us, and the young people who come after us.

Presenters
MD

Mallery Denny

Mallery Denny, Youth Support Worker, Eskasoni Mental Health Service (EMHS), has worked in mental health with EMHS for the past 6 years with experience in youth support and crisis work. Mallery has also been involved in research collaborations and played a key role in the Spaces and Places Research Project in Eskasoni. Prior to working with EMHS Mallery often volunteered at community events in Eskasoni and her dedication to building community... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

5:15pm

Who Is Supporting Resilience In Refugee Youth And Families? A Case Study Of The Peaceful Village
Abstract #281
Who is Supporting Resilience in Refugee Youth and Families? A Case Study of the Peaceful Village
Presenter: Stephanie Yamniuk
Abstract:
The purpose of this phenomenological study is to explore the sociocultural and contextual factors that either hinder or promote the resilience of refugee youth. Special attention will be made to the contextual factors of the individual, the family and cultural impacts, and the Peaceful Village's impact on eight developing refugee youth as they adapt to a new community, and experience aspects of risk and resilience.

 


Presenters
avatar for Stephanie Yamniuk

Stephanie Yamniuk

Doctoral Candidate and Sessional Instructor, University of Manitoba
Stephanie Yamniuk is an instructor at the University of Manitoba, focusing on children’s rights, family resilience, cross-cultural education, and relationships between schools and diverse families. She was a guest speaker on the child’s rights to participate at the Centre for Human Rights Research and Canadian Museum for Human Rights, 2011 Critical Conversation lecture series, and has spoken on cultural competence and the complex issues of... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

6:30pm

Book Signing - Michael Ungar, Donna Mertens, Ann Masten
Bring your books that you want to be signed to this great event!

Thursday June 18, 2015 6:30pm - 7:30pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College
 
Friday, June 19
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Come by for the last breakfast of the conference and enjoy some great food!


Friday June 19, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
King's College King's College

8:30am

Concurrent Plenary Presentations
Enjoy listening to Plenary Presentations including:

Application of Resilience Theory to Services for Socially Marginalied Youth
Speaker: Kwame McKenzie

How to Influence Social Policy to Build Resilience
Speaker: Alcinda Honwana

Longitudinal Research on Resilience
Speaker: Fons van de Vijver

Researching Resilience in Youth: Practical Strategies and Aboriginal Perspectives
Speaker: Christine Wekerle

Transformative, Mixed Methods Resilience Research
Speaker Donna Mertens 

Speakers
avatar for Alcinda Honwana

Alcinda Honwana

Alcinda Honwana worked as a Professor and Chair of International Development (Africa) at the Open University. She was also the director of the International Development Centre (IDC) an OU inter-faculty centre that focused on research and interventions on issues of international development. Before joining the Open University she was the Director of the Africa and the Children and Armed Conflict Programmes at the Social Science Research Council in... Read More →
avatar for Kwame McKenzie

Kwame McKenzie

Dr. McKenzie is Medical Director of Underserved Populations; Access & Transitions at CAMH. As a Senior Scientist, he specializes in Systems and Health Equity Research at CAMH. Additionally, Dr. McKenzie is Director of the Social Aetiology of Mental Illness (SAMI) CIHR Training Centre. He is a full Professor and the Co-Director of the Division of Equity Gender and Population in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. Dr. McKenzie is... Read More →
avatar for Donna Mertens

Donna Mertens

Donna M. Mertens is Professor in the Department of Education at Gallaudet University. She teaches research methods and program evaluation to deaf and hearing students at the MA and PhD levels. She conducts research and evaluation studies on such topics as improvement of special education services in international settings, planning for the inclusion of students with disabilities in neighborhood schools, enhancing the educational experiences... Read More →
avatar for Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver

Professor at Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands | Fons van de Vijver holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia. He has (co-)authored over 400 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. He is a former editor of the Journal of... Read More →
avatar for Christine Wekerle

Christine Wekerle

Dr. Wekerle is an Associate Professor in Pediatrics and an Associate Member of the Offord Centre for Child Studies, McMaster University. She obtained her Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) in 1995 from The University of Western Ontario, an American and Canadian Psychological Association accredited program and conducted her accredited internship at McMaster, in Pediatrics. Dr. Wekerle's research areas are broadly in the areas of parenting and the... Read More →


Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
King's College King's College

8:30am

Plenary speaker Alcinda Honwana "How to Influence Social Policy to Build Resilience"
Youth Resilience and Social Protest in Africa
Speaker: Alcinda Honwana
Africa is the world’s youngest continent. Although in the past decades the continent has experienced considerable economic growth, this has not translated into job creation and greater equity. Massive unemployment and lack of sustainable livelihoods have severely affected the younger generation who find it difficult to carve out a decent future. Most young Africans are living in a period of suspension between childhood and adulthood that I call ‘waithood’. In this state of limbo, young people create their own 'youthscapes' to cope with the daily challenges in their lives. In the past few years, youth street protests are challenging the status quo and contesting socioeconomic policies and governance strategies that exacerbate poverty, heighten social inequalities, and deny them basic freedoms. Counteracting the idea that youth are apathetic, young men and women struggling with waithood, in Africa and elsewhere in the world, are emerging as active social agents. What will be the result of these youth movements? Will young people be able to sustain them beyond street protests and hold onto the promise for more equitable societies?

Speakers
avatar for Alcinda Honwana

Alcinda Honwana

Alcinda Honwana worked as a Professor and Chair of International Development (Africa) at the Open University. She was also the director of the International Development Centre (IDC) an OU inter-faculty centre that focused on research and interventions on issues of international development. Before joining the Open University she was the Director of the Africa and the Children and Armed Conflict Programmes at the Social Science Research Council in... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Archibald Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

8:30am

Plenary speaker Christine Wekerle "Researching Resilience in Youth: Practical Strategies and Aboriginal Perspectives"
Researching Resilience in Youth: Practical Strategies and Aboriginal Perspectives
Speaker: Christine Wekerle
Presented alongside Sherry Stewart, Marlyn Bennett, and Diane Obed. For Aboriginal youth, there are various contexts of adversity and many more contexts of resilience. Globally, this is the decade for youth, and Aboriginal youth populations are growing, creating a unique opportunity for youth engagement and prevention. Key prevention issues are suicidality, substance abuse, mental health. The practical strategies providing support to a building resilience mindset, recognition of cultural, community, and signature strengths and, importantly, a coherent vocal and imaginative personal narrative are among the emergent evidence-based interventions for Aboriginal youth and as cross-over applications to non-Aboriginal youth. This plenary panel will discuss the evidence and highlight some future opportunities, especially in the support of male mental health and the recognition of and resilience from sexual exploitation.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Wekerle

Christine Wekerle

Dr. Wekerle is an Associate Professor in Pediatrics and an Associate Member of the Offord Centre for Child Studies, McMaster University. She obtained her Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) in 1995 from The University of Western Ontario, an American and Canadian Psychological Association accredited program and conducted her accredited internship at McMaster, in Pediatrics. Dr. Wekerle's research areas are broadly in the areas of parenting and the... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Seminar Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

8:30am

Plenary speaker Donna Mertens "Transformative, Mixed Methods Resilience Research"
Transformative, Mixed Methods Resilience Research
Speaker: Donna Mertens
Members of marginalized communities, such as deaf people and women and girls with disabilities, are seldom represented in the design of programs and research that are supposed to resolve challenges that they face. A transformative mixed methods approach to research provides one mechanism for providing an evidence-based strategy to increase the presence of members of marginalized communities in the development of solutions and the assessment of their effectiveness. Many of the challenges experienced by people in developing countries, or in developed countries by virtue of living in poverty, have solutions that are based on an understanding of culture and context that are not commonly privileged in the research world. Transformative researchers strive to understand the challenges and resilience present in marginalized communities as a way forward to determining how to bring scientific knowledge from a culturally responsive perspective into the search for solutions to such wicked problems as education, employment, food insecurity, natural disasters, clean water and sanitation.

Speakers
avatar for Donna Mertens

Donna Mertens

Donna M. Mertens is Professor in the Department of Education at Gallaudet University. She teaches research methods and program evaluation to deaf and hearing students at the MA and PhD levels. She conducts research and evaluation studies on such topics as improvement of special education services in international settings, planning for the inclusion of students with disabilities in neighborhood schools, enhancing the educational experiences... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

8:30am

Plenary speaker Fons van de Vijver "Longitudinal Research on Resilience"
Longitudinal Research on Resilience
Speaker: Fon van de Vijver
Change and growth are important parts of resilience. In this presentation I start with a brief history of the measurement of change and describe how in qualitative and quantitative approaches change has been studied. The common problem of both traditions is to identify change against a backdrop of stability: What has changed and what has remained the same over time? Notably the quantitative tradition has a rich history in measuring change. Starting from the fundamental problems as observed by Bereiter in 1963 (such as the unreliability of change scores), I will indicate how we have progressed. Particular attention will be paid to multilevel modeling as the most up-to-date procedure for modeling change. Examples will be drawn from the resilience literature to illustrate the basic problems and solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Fons van de Vijver

Fons van de Vijver

Professor at Department of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands | Fons van de Vijver holds a chair in cross-cultural psychology at Tilburg University, the Netherlands and an extraordinary chair at North-West University, South Africa, and the University of Queensland, Australia. He has (co-)authored over 400 publications, mainly in the domain of cross-cultural psychology. He is a former editor of the Journal of... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Haliburton Room A&A Main Floor, King's College

8:30am

Plenary speaker Kwame McKenzie "Application of Resilience Theory to Services for Socially Marginalized Youth"
Application of Resilience Theory to Services for Socially Marginalized Youth
Speaker: Kwame McKenzie
In a recent paper published by the British Medical Association, an international group of specialists concluded that the current WHO definition of health was unobtainable and a better way to consider health was the ability to adapt and to be resilient. Similarly mental health may be considered in part the ability to adapt and be resilient psychologically. This lays down a significant challenge to society. Rather than developing “ mental health” services that mainly treat illness, a more balanced approach would be to develop services which promote mental resilience. Furthermore, if resilience is conceptualized as a multi-level phenomenon then, in order to promote an individual’s level of resilience, services should also consider what needs to be done at an environmental level. This would be especially important in the more challenging environments that some marginalized youth are brought up in. This presentation will discuss the implications of resilience theory for mental health services for marginalized youth using Antenna mental health services in the UK as an example.

Speakers
avatar for Kwame McKenzie

Kwame McKenzie

Dr. McKenzie is Medical Director of Underserved Populations; Access & Transitions at CAMH. As a Senior Scientist, he specializes in Systems and Health Equity Research at CAMH. Additionally, Dr. McKenzie is Director of the Social Aetiology of Mental Illness (SAMI) CIHR Training Centre. He is a full Professor and the Co-Director of the Division of Equity Gender and Population in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. Dr. McKenzie is... Read More →

Friday June 19, 2015 8:30am - 10:00am
Alumni Hall NAB 1st Floor, King's College

10:00am

Break
Take 30 minutes to prepare yourselves for more paper presentations!


Friday June 19, 2015 10:00am - 10:30am
King's College King's College

10:30am

Concurrent Paper Presentations
Enjoy papers by presenters such as Stefania Maggi, Adam Winsler, and Maria Angela Matter Yunes, on topics such as Natural Disasters, Publication Processes, and Youth at Risk.


Friday June 19, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm

10:30am

Community Based Resilience - Srividya Iyer, Kathleen Giles
Community Based Resilience:

Abstract #91
A Community-Driven Youth Mental Healthcare Project In Kashmir, India
Presenter: Srividya Iyer
Abstract:
This presentation outlines a community-driven youth mental healthcare project in Kashmir, India. The Kashmir conflict, simmering since India’s postcolonial partition, has intensified since 1989. In addition to socioeconomic devastation and displacement, this conflict has precipitated a 30-fold increase in the anecdotally observed incidence of mental illness. The situation is exacerbated by the virtual absence of state-provided mental healthcare and the Kashmir valley’s geopolitical isolation. On the credit side of the equation are the adversity-forged resilience of Kashmir’s people; the density of their familial and communal networks; their generally high levels of education; and the growth of geography-defying telecommunication technologies in India. Our Grand Challenges Canada project uses these strengths to provide mental healthcare to youths (aged 14-30) in Kashmir’s Ganderbal district. The project earned its social licence through early engagement with culturally significant leaders (village elders, imams, etc.). Its innovative, low-cost model entails training lay community mental health workers to identify needs, provide basic services and promote awareness. Geographical barriers are surmounted by using a vehicle-mounted mobile clinic and inexpensive telecommunication technologies for training and consultations. Using extant sociocultural resources and resiliencies to minimize costs and maximize impact, the project thus provides much-needed primary mental healthcare to an underserved population.

Abstract #148
Community Engagement To Identify Community Resilience Policy Options: Deliberative Polling In Uganda: A Case for Bududa And Butalejja Districts
Presenter:  Kathleen Giles Co-presenters: Bazeyo William, Fishkin James, Roy William Mayega, Lynn Atuyambe, Julius Ssentongo
Abstract:
Background: Multiple people in Uganda are increasingly at risk for adverse climate events with Albertine, Teso and Mt.Elgon regions reporting a high risk. There are recurrent climatic events that have rendered the same damage to livelihoods and infrastructure despite predictability, millions of aid in response and attempts at mitigation which implies wide-scale lack of resilience and negative coping. Objective: To determine whether community opinions on key policy options (Land management, Resettlement management and Population pressure) can change when better informed about policy. Methodology: Using a Deliberative Polling® approach a random representative sample was selected and a baseline opinion poll on selected policy issues conducted in Bududa and Butalejja districts. The same sample was invited to a facilitated deliberation on these policy issues and thereafter, a post deliberation opinion poll conducted. Policy options were rated on an ordinal scale ranging from zero (Unimportant) to ten (Extremely important) and statistical differences in means tested using t-test.Results: Fifteen of 36 policy options changed with deliberation and changes were in the direction of increased support for policy optionsConclusion: Community opinions about policy can change with sufficient participatory dialogue and policy process can be greatly enhanced by employing a bottom-up approach. 

Presenters
SI

Srividya Iyer

Srividya Iyer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University. She is the Coordinator of the Prevention and Early Intervention Program for Psychosis at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and plays a leadership role in ACCESS-Canada, a newly launched CIHR initiative to transform youth mental health in Canada. Her research interests are in youth mental health and early intervention, in the Canadian and... Read More →

Co-Presenters
LA

Lynn Atuyambe

Assoc Prof at Makerere University | Lynn Atuyambe, Ph.D., (Public Health Sciences International Health) teaches at the Makerere University School of Public Health-Department of Community Health and Behavioural Sciences. He obtained his doctorate from Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Swed
FJ

Fishkin James

Prof. at Stanford University | Fishkin received his BA degree and Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. He holds a second Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cambridge University, United Kingdom. He is the current director of Stanford's Center for Deliberative Democracy.
avatar for Roy William Mayega

Roy William Mayega

Deputy Chief of Party, ResilientAfrica Network
Doctor at Makerere University Roy William Mayega is a lecturer at the department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Makerere University School of Public Health, Uganda. He has a PhD Medical Science from Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and he is currently the Deputy CoP at RAN
JS

Julius Ssentongo

Doctor at Resilient Africa Network | Dr Julius Ssentongo is a public Health Researcher at Makerere University School of Public Health
BW

Bazeyo William

Assoc Prof at Makerere University | Dr. William Bazeyo is an Associate Professor of Occupational Medicine at Makerere University College of Health Sciences, School of Public Health and is currently the Dean of the School. He received an MBCHB from Makerere University and M.Med in Occupation


Friday June 19, 2015 10:30am - 12:00pm
Frazee Room NAB 2nd Floor, King's College