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Thursday, June 18 • 5:15pm - 7:45pm
Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors Of Later Academic Success In Elementary School Students

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Abstract #297
Resilience Among Low-Income, Ethnically Diverse Children: Early Predictors of Later Academic Success in Elementary School Students
Presenter: Jameela Conway-Turner Co - Presenters: Tanya Tavassolie, Adam Winsler
Abstract:
Resilience is defined as academic/social competency despite experiencing significant challenges (Masten & Coatsworth, 1998). Using public school records of child ethnicity, gender, receipt of free/reduced lunch, language at home, and parent report of marital status and education, we examine longitudinal predictors of academic resilience (receiving ≥ B average and passing standardized tests) using data from the Miami School Readiness Project. This sample includes 28,138 children (59.1% Hispanic, 33.5% Black; 57% ELL; 79% receiving free/reduced lunch) who completed third-grade after attending subsidized childcare and/or public school pre-K and receiving school readiness assessments in pre-K. Resilient students (~60% of sample) were less likely to be in poverty and more likely to be native English speakers, White, female, and from two-parent households with more educated parents. Selecting only those in poverty in K, logistic regression analyses found children’s social-emotional strengths at age four significantly predicted third-grade academic achievement. Additional analyses will investigate whether relations between social-emotional strengths and later academic achievement are different for different ethnic groups. Although numerous risk-factors decrease the likelihood of academic excellence, many children in poverty overcome such challenges and do well academically. Early social-emotional skills serve as an important protective factor for children experiencing early economic adversity.

Presenters
JC

Jameela Conway-Turner

Jameela is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Jameela received her Masters degree from Boston College in Applied Developmental and Educational Psychology. She has presented at and attended numerous prestigious psychological research conferences. Research interests include examining the educational and social environment of... Read More →

Co-Presenters
TT

Tanya Tavassolie

Doctoral Student at George Mason University Tanya is a doctoral student at George Mason University in the Applied Developmental Psychology program, under the mentorship of Dr. Adam Winsler. Prior to attending GMU, Tanya worked as a research assistant in the Child Development Lab at University of Maryland. She has presented at and attended numerous prestigious psychological research conferences. Research interests include examining the... Read More →
avatar for Adam Winsler

Adam Winsler

Professor, George Mason University
Dr. Adam Winsler is professor of applied developmental psychology at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, USA. His research, represented in over 90 publications, examines private speech (self-talk) and its role in behavioral self-regulation and executive function among typically developing children as well as children with ADHD or autism. He also studies early childhood programs, school readiness, kindergarten retention, and bilingual... Read More →


Thursday June 18, 2015 5:15pm - 7:45pm
King's Gym Gymnasium, King's College

Attendees (5)