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Wednesday, June 17 • 11:00am - 12:30pm
Resilience: An International Perspective - Kathryn Robertson, Karen Elliott, Charles Mphande, Alex Pessoa, Serena Isaacs, Steve Reid

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Resilience: An International Perspective

Abstract #11
Using resilience concepts to improve client outcomes in East Timor
Presenter: Kathryn Robertson
Abstract:
Timor-Leste is a resource poor country which endured more than 20 years of human rights abuses under Occupation by Indonesia. Post-Independence, there has been considerable work done to raise attention about trauma and violence against women and to develop laws, policies and services to respond to violence. While there has been progress, there are many challenges to make these systems really work for women and children who experience abuse. A four year program supported by the Australian Government is now trying to strengthen services through a greater focus on outcomes for clients. In this environment where there is limited access to services for a largely rural population and service providers are learning on the job without much professional training, we are looking at how to use approaches which are informed by resilience and well-being concepts. This may will include using resilience as a guide in assessment, provision of services and monitoring of outcomes. We are interested to look at approaches in other places (for example with First Nations communities) which could be contextualized to the customary and collective nature of culture and everyday life. This experience will be presented through Facilitated Discussion and Brief Presentation.

Abstract #31
Cultivating Resilience in Organizations and Communities: A Collaborative Process and Planning Tool for Intercultural Leaders
Presenter: Karen Elliot
Abstract:
This facilitated discussion provides an introduction to a practical, evidence-based, collaborative leadership process and tool that intercultural leaders can use to guide discussions in communities and organizations. (See visual for process - end of abstract)   The process itself incorporates principles of community building for health (systems thinking), community engagement, and collaborative leadership. The visual for the process is a table framework that facilitates introduction of concepts as follows:  elements of culture and individual resilience (people, place), resilience science (adapt to education needs of audience at-hand), contributors to community and organizational resilience, equity and inclusion, systems thinking, stress, change adversity. The tool is useful for guiding discussions about resilience policy/advocacy/education. It is vital to use a process which is relevant to the leaders at-hand, adaptable in diverse settings, and which incorporates concepts of individual, community, and organizational resilience (and emphasizes their interconnectedness) in the process itself. The equity/inclusion portion of the visual creates an opportunity to discuss the social determinants of health, health equity, mental health, interventions, literacy, social competence and connectedness.

Abstract #53
Linking or Delinking: Resilience and Social Capital in an Unfriendly Environment for Emerging African Communities in Australia
Presenter: Charles Mphande
Abstract:
This paper investigates how informal networks enable the bonding function of social capital within emerging Sudanese and Horn of African communities in the context of Australian society’s continuing environment of racism and misunderstanding towards African-Australians. . Framed by social ecology (Bottrell and Armstrong 2012), and critical discourse theories (Phillips and Jorgensen 2002) we examine multi-layering of informal networks as a means of maximisation of in-group resources against the hostile backdrop of the Howard Government’s focus on the perceived integrative deficits of Sudanese (African) humanitarian immigrants. Given the unwelcome environment the Howard Government created for these recent immigrants (Dhanji 2009), the paper adopts the view that community resilience by in-group bonding, as opposed to linking with wider Australian society, was a selective, strategic and practical means of survival that bypassed formal community, government and non-governmental organisations as largely irrelevant. We focus especially on examining government’s interpretations of such phenomena as failure to integrate, a position that led to limiting African humanitarian immigration. The paper further discusses the vibrancy and effectiveness of informal networks and argues for the promise they offer for addressing needs and challenges of emerging communities.

Abstract #16
Research and Intervention on Resilience Applied to Latin American Context
Presenter: Alex Pessoa
Abstract:
The research and theoretical frameworks on resilience are mostly coming from the Northern Hemisphere. My proposal is to argue that these studies ignore the particularities of Latin American countries and neglect model of social inequality as the main element for the exposition of young adolescent to indicators of psychosocial risk. I advocate the establishment of collaborative networks in order to create interventional practices and research methodologies that highlight these aspects. In this sense, I believe it is relevant to build a theoretical model to challenge hegemonic notions of resilience that has no applicability in Latin America and do not collaborate in disruption of oppressive social structures historically built under a model which prevails inequality and disenfranchisement of some segments. The universities and researchers interested on resilience theory must join forces to design a consistent epistemological frameworks for the groups belonging to this reality. Furthermore, I understand that the policies and interventional programs should target practices that allow emancipation and the breaking of cycles that perpetuate vulnerability across generations. The audience contributions may allow the beginning of the articulation around this reflective process and may bring implications for the field.

Abstract #47
Understanding Family Resilience in a Rural Community in the Western Cape: A Needs Assessment Pilot Study
Presenter: Serena Issacs
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a pilot study in which the aim was to identify the family resilience needs of community members in the rural community in the Western Cape, South Africa.  The questionnaire utilised was the Family Resilience Assessment Scale by Sixbey (2005); an English-language questionnaire which assesses the resilience needs of a family unit.  Since the scale was developed in English, the scale was adapted in the language spoken by 96% of the community (Statistics South Africa, 2012): Afrikaans.  Pilot testing was essential in establishing psychometric properties and identifying any inconsistencies or ambiguity during the adaptation process.  Trained fieldworkers then commenced door-to-door data collection and reached 82 participants.  Preliminary analysis shows that some items were misinterpreted based on translation and need to be further adapted for the main data collection in the next year.  Fieldworker feedback also highlighted the cathartic effect of completing such a questionnaire; the local NGO has since increased the number of people registered for their family discussion group.  This pilot study is forms part of a larger study which has the ultimate goal of developing a community-based programme for strengthening family resilience using a participatory action approach.

Abstract #55
Resilience in South African Health Professionals Undergoing Compulsory Service
Presenter: Steve Reid
Abstract:
This paper investigates how informal networks enable the bonding function of social capital within emerging Sudanese and Horn of African communities in the context of Australian society’s continuing environment of racism and misunderstanding towards African-Australians. . Framed by social ecology (Bottrell and Armstrong 2012), and critical discourse theories (Phillips and Jorgensen 2002) we examine multi-layering of informal networks as a means of maximisation of in-group resources against the hostile backdrop of the Howard Government’s focus on the perceived integrative deficits of Sudanese (African) humanitarian immigrants. Given the unwelcome environment the Howard Government created for these recent immigrants (Dhanji 2009), the paper adopts the view that community resilience by in-group bonding, as opposed to linking with wider Australian society, was a selective, strategic and practical means of survival that bypassed formal community, government and non-governmental organisations as largely irrelevant. We focus especially on examining government’s interpretations of such phenomena as failure to integrate, a position that led to limiting African humanitarian immigration. The paper further discusses the vibrancy and effectiveness of informal networks and argues for the promise they offer for addressing needs and challenges of emerging communities.

Presenters
avatar for Alex Pessoa

Alex Pessoa

PhD Candidate, UNESP
PhD candidate linked to Faculty of Science and Tecnology, University from Sao Paulo (UNESP), Sao Paulo, Brazil. In the last years the researcher developed studies and interventions in the field of childhood and youth' protection. His papers and book chapters are related to sexual... Read More →
CM

Charles Mphande

Victoria university
Charles Mphande is a Senior Lecturer in the College of Arts and a member of the Mobilities, Transitions and Resilience Network of the Centre for Cultural Diversity and Wellbeing at Victoria University, Melbourne. His empirical research has focused on resilience as individual or group... Read More →
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Karen Elliott

Cross-sector leadership development professional. Seventeen years as a public health professional. Specialized in collaborative leadership, coalition building (immunizations,vaccine safety, nutrition), health systems, health disparities, equity and inclusion, intercultural communication... Read More →
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Kathryn Robertson

Kathryn Robertson is a Canadian trained social worker and has had experience in service provision for women, children and other vulnerable groups, in Canada and Asia. In Timor-Leste she helped to establish the first counseling and medical support service for family violence and sexual... Read More →
avatar for Serena Isaacs

Serena Isaacs

Lecturer, University of the Western Cape - Psychology
Miss Serena Isaacs is a Research Psychologist registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa and is a lecturer at the University of the Western Cape. She has published in the field of children and adolescent wellbeing, community violence and substance abuse. She is... Read More →
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Steve Reid

Steve Reid is a family physician with a background in rural health and a doctorate in education, currently director of Primary Health Care at the University of Cape Town. He is involved in medical education and human resources for health, and is particularly interested in the development... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
ScotiaBank Room NAB 3rd Floor, King's College

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