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Wednesday, June 17 • 11:00am - 12:30pm
School Programs - Alicia Barrett, Maureen Thompson, Darlene Klyne, Jo Robins, Michelle Koay, Ella Simmons

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School Programs:

Abstract #43
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability. Case Study 1 in Dropout Prevention: North Winnipeg
Presenter: Darlene Klyne Co - Presenter: Konrad Glogowski
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #59
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability: A Survey of What Works
Presenter: Maureen Thompson
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #64
Nurturing Resilience through Student Engagement and Program Adaptability: Case Study 2 in Dropout Prevention: Spryfield, Nova Scotia
Presenter: Alicia Barrett Co-Presenter: Derek Smith, Konrad Glogowski
Abstract:
The Pathways to Education program, founded in Toronto’s Regent Park in 2001 to address high youth disengagement and dropout rates in one of Canada’s most disadvantaged communities, has been replicated throughout Canada and is now reaching well over 5,000 high school students in 17 communities across the country.
This case study explores one adaptation of the Pathways program and the role that program staff, local partner organizations (schools, community organizations, service providers), and program participants play in building strong relationships, safe spaces, and a sense of belonging - all of which, in turn, help nurture resilience and academic success. Since high school dropout is a long and complex process and the risk factors are very diverse, effective programming must help students navigate a variety of challenges as well as toxic environments, relationships, and experiences. While the program’s four programmatic pillars remain the same throughout the 17 communities where it has been implemented, its adaptability ensures that local staff, partners, and program beneficiaries can play a key role in ensuring program success. This case study focuses on how program adaptability, local staff, community partners, and students ensure the centrality of the youth experience, and, in turn, nurture resilience and help stop potentially disabling “significant markers” from assailing students as they progress through high school and adolescence.

Abstract #12
Think Good Feel Good - A Whole School Approach
Presenter: Jo Robins
Abstract:
Think Good, Feel Good is a school based programme within primary and secondary schools in Shropshire. The core aim is to develop a whole school approach to supporting and developing resilience through six core components. Those are; by increasing awareness of mental health/resilience/health ill health, by developing a common language for children to express thoughts and feelings, by supporting schools to set up projects in schools that build confidence and self-esteem, by delivering an evidence based training programme, by access to high quality resources, by strengthening links to local mental health services. The programme is supported by a steering group, a small team and through a wider network of practitioners with interests, or expertise in mental or children's wellbeing. The success is borne out in the children who participate in the interventions, in the school staff and in the schools who have embedded the programme in their everyday practice. Feedback from children, staff, local clinicians and Ofsted has been very positive. Quotes from children include "It's really helped to know others worry like I do", when I feel angry or sad I know what I can do to make me feel happy". Teachers say "It's great to be able to help the children with coping strategies in school".

Abstract #24
Working With Students To Improve Resilience Within The School
Presenter: Michelle Koay
Abstract:
In Singapore, the schools recognise that the importance of the social-emotional well-being of students in order to facilitate their development and learning. In most local schools, the school counsellors are responsible for reaching out to the students through prevention and education talks and workshops related to building resilience and improving their mental well-being, with the support of the teachers in the classroom setting. The teachers are trained to provide psychological first-aid for students who require support and to refer more serious cases to the school counsellors for further assessment and treatment.
However, in Secondary Schools, another potential resource to be tapped on is working with the students. This paper will explore how the potential and strengths of adolescents can be harnessed to improve the mental well-being of the students. The paper will elaborate on how the school leverages on peer groups to reach out to their peers who need emotional help and/or support. The paper will also show the school’s efforts to inspire the creative energies of the youth to raise awareness about mental health issues among their peers. The paper will share examples of how students use social media and other school-wide initiatives and activities to influence their peers.

Abstract #35
Show and Tell: Explicitly Teaching the Skills of Resilience in the Classroom
Presenter: Ella Simmons
Abstract:
Every day, children are faced with classroom and playground challenges that require social skills, emotional regulation and problem-solving. There is an assumption that students present to school with the foundation skills for resilience, and will develop these skills further through incidental teaching and participation in the school environment. Some students however will require a more explicit approach to learn the skills needed to establish positive relationships and manage challenging situations. Explicit instruction has been firmly established as an effective method of improving literacy and numeracy outcomes for our students which poses the question: Can we approach social and emotional learning in the same way? As a teacher, I am advocating for personal and social skills to be recognised as more than a 'general capability' within the Australian curriculum. There is a need for schools to adopt comprehensive programmes that focus on the explicit instruction of social and emotional skills combined with opportunities to practice in a supportive and structured environment. By approaching the development of these skills in a formal and coordinated way, we will ensure that all children leave primary school equipped with the skills for lifelong resiliency...

Presenters
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Alicia Barrett

Student Parent Support Worker, Chebucto Connections (Pathways to Education)
I have worked for Chebucto Connections since 2013 as a Student Parent Support Worker with Pathways to Education in Spryfield, Nova Scotia. I grew up in Halifax and completed a Bachelor of Science in Biology at Dalhousie University and Bachelor of Secondary Education at Mount Saint... Read More →
DK

Darlene Klyne

Director, Pathways Winnipeg at Community Education Development Association Darlene Klyne is a Cree and Lakota mother, wife and grandmother. Darlene is passionate about two things-the value of education and the wellness of the Aboriginal community. At the age of 44 she pursued her... Read More →
avatar for Ella Simmons

Ella Simmons

Teacher, Dunsborough Primary School
Ella Simmons is a 25 year old primary school teacher from Dunsborough, Western Australia. She graduated from Curtin University in 2011 with the prestigious Miles Medal Award for Excellence in Education for receiving the highest overall mark in her undergraduate degree. Ella has a... Read More →
avatar for Jo Robins

Jo Robins

Consultant in Public Health, Shropshire Council
Jo is a public health consultant with many years experience of working in the NHS and in local government leading and developing health improvement programmes for children and adults. During her career she has applied community development skills at strategic, operational and community... Read More →
MT

Maureen Thompson

Maureen Thompson has been working in leadership positions in the health promotion and community health sectors for over 20 years.  She started her career in drug prevention, international development and human rights, community development and health promotion.  She held the position... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Koay

Michelle Koay

School Counsellor, Raffles Girls' School
Michelle Koay was trained as a lay counsellor when she was an engineering officer in the Republic of Singapore Air Force. After obtaining her Master of Social Science (Counselling), she embarked on her journey as a counsellor in the Singapore Armed Forces Counselling Centre, helping... Read More →

Co-Presenters
avatar for Konrad Glogowski

Konrad Glogowski

Director, Research and Knowledge Mobilization, Pathways to Education Canada
As Director of Research and Knowledge Mobilization at Pathways to Education Canada, Konrad Glogowski is responsible for developing and implementing a long-term national research agenda and strategy for the organization, and providing internal research support to better understand... Read More →
avatar for Derek Smith

Derek Smith

Student Parent Support Worker, Chebucto Connections, Pathways to Education Spryfield
Derek has worked at Chebucto Connections as a Student Parent Support Worker for the Pathways to Education program since September 2013. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Saint Mary's University and a Bachelor of Education degree from Mount Saint Vincent University... Read More →


Wednesday June 17, 2015 11:00am - 12:30pm
KTS Lecture Hall NAB 2nd Floor, King's College

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